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mikey
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« on: April 20, 2008, 08:10:55 AM »

News
China enhances poultry subsidies // 18 Apr 2008


According to American Agriculturalist, state-controlled media has reported that China's government will give subsidies worth millions of yuan to boost production on large pig and chicken breeding units.
 


 
Citing the central government's National Development & Reform Commission, Xinhua news agency reported that breeder chicken units will see up to 1 million yuan depending on their scale of production.

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mikey
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2008, 08:12:44 AM »

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Huge hatchery built in Russia// 18 Apr 2008


HatchTech Incubation Technology and Russian based ‘GAP Resource’ owned by Victor Nauruzov, have agreed upon the construction of a brand new turnkey hatchery facility, with a production capacity of 80 million eggs per year.


 
After delivering a 35 million egg/year hatchery in the end of 2006, GAP Resource once more confirms its trust in HatchTech. This trust is, according to GAP Resource, based on excellent hatching results and reliable first-rate (Russian speaking) after sales service.
HatchTech will deliver a turnkey hatchery including 36 HatchTech MicroClimer Setters (cap.126720 eggs), 18 HatchTech MicroClimer Hatchers (cap. 42240 eggs) and the complete system for ventilation, cooling and heating. A ‘hatchery management system’ will secure efficient energy usage and proper ventilation and incubation.
Founded in 2002, GAP Resource is a leading, fast growing producer of poultry meat in the Southern regions of Russia. Currently GAP Resource consists out of 2 feed mills, 11 breeding and broiler enterprises and 2 processing plants producing 60,000 tonnes of meat per year. GAP Resource has a range of 40 brands of broiler meat products that are distributed in Moscow and all Southern regions of Russia.
 

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mikey
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2008, 08:14:17 AM »

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Location announced for US plant powered by poultry litter// 18 Apr 2008


Fibrowatt, a US company that generates renewable energy from poultry litter, has announced that it has selected Sampson County as the location for its first plant in North Carolina.


 
 "We're delighted that a Fibrowatt plant is coming to eastern North Carolina. The citizens of Sampson County have been very supportive of this project and have worked hard to bring this important development to our area," said Jeff Wilson, chairman of the Sampson County Board of Commissioners.
The 55-megawatt plant is expected to cost over US$200 mln, and according to the company, the facility will create about 100 jobs. Fibrowatt hopes to begin construction in 2009 and begin operating in 2011.
It has also been reported that the company will receive a 10-year tax-incentive package worth $2.5 mln from Sampson County, plus assistance with infrastructure improvements, including water and sewer services.
An additional 2 plants
Fibrowatt intends to develop three plants in North Carolina and expects to announce plant locations in central and western North Carolina upon completion of evaluations in these areas. The company is currently evaluating sites in Surry County and Wilkes County in western North Carolina, and Moore County, Montgomery County and Stanly County in central North Carolina.
 

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« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2008, 08:16:04 AM »

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Bird flu skin patch under development// 17 Apr 2008


A small biotechnology company, which is trying to develop needle-free bird flu vaccines, has received US government approval to test a bird flu skin patch on more people.


 
Iomai's patch is not a vaccine, but rather delivers an 'adjuvant', which is an immune boosting agent that will be delivered along with a vaccine to try to make it work better.
"The Iomai immunostimulant patch has the potential to change how we react to an influenza pandemic, and we will move ahead quickly with the development of this technology," said president and CEO of Iomai, Stanley Erck.
The Health and Human Services Department, which gave Iomai $128 million to work on the patch in 2007, said the company could do a phase 2 safety trial -- typically involving a few dozen people to see if a product is safe and whether there is any indication it works.
If a phase 2 trial succeeds, companies can move to phase 3 studies, which are carefully designed to prove a product has the intended effect and are needed for final approval by the US Food and Drug Administration.
The patch, applied after gently scraping the skin with a sandpaper-like device, is being used to boost an H5N1 vaccine made by the Belgian drug company Solvay SOLV.BR.
Last month, the company reported the skin patch helped boost a bird flu vaccine so well that people appear to be protected by a single dose. This could help stretch vaccine supply during a pandemic.
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« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2008, 08:29:37 AM »

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Unilever and McDonalds change to free-range eggs// 17 Apr 2008


McDonald’s and Unilever will stop using battery eggs for their products. Both multinational concerns confirmed to the animal welfare organisation Compassion In World Farming (CIWF) that they will only use free-range eggs from now on.


 
 The Dutch/British food and cosmetics concern Unilever uses 650 million eggs per year in Europe. The eggs are used in mayonnaise, dressing, ice-cream and shampoo. To meet this demand, 2.5 million chickens are needed. Before 2010, all the products should be made from free-range eggs. The transfer from battery eggs to free-range eggs will be done in phases. It will be first implemented in Europe and then in the rest of the world.
This week, McDonald’s and Unilever were awarded with the Compassion In World Farming's Good Egg Award. This award is introduced by the CIWF.
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2008, 11:24:35 AM »

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Linking amino acids and trace minerals to feathers in layers// 21 Apr 2008


Recently completed research* funded by the US Poultry & Egg Association studied the effects of dietary sulfur amino acids and trace minerals on feather cover in laying hens.


 
 Importance of the study
Feather cover is important for its insulation value and protection from scratches and injury to the hen’s skin. In commercial settings, surveys indicate a rapid deterioration in feather cover after the hens are about 40 weeks of age, with some recovery after molt and then again a rapid deterioration during the second cycle of egg production. The United Egg Producers Animal Husbandry Guidelines also note the importance of adequate feather cover for the welfare of the laying hen.
Objectives
The objectives of the research were to test the level of cystine and methionine supplementation necessary to optimise feather cover during the first and second cycles of egg production, and to investigate the effects of supplemental selenium (Se) or zinc (Zn) on feather cover through the first and second cycles of egg production.
Results
Egg production (EP) was significantly affected by dietary amino acid treatment during all three phases of production. During Phase 1, EP was greatest for hens on the control diet (low methionine and basal cystine) or high cystine diets. During Phase 2, EP was greatest for hens fed the highest level of methionine supplementation. There was no benefit to cystine supplementation during Phase 2. During Phase 3, positive effects of high levels of methionine or cystine supplementation were quite apparent for improved egg production. Trace mineral supplementation had a transitory effect on egg production during Phase 2 of the study, showing improved EP when hens were fed inorganic Se combined with 100 ppm Zn from Bioplex.
Egg weights were only significantly affected during Phase 2, at which time hens fed the highest level of methionine had the greatest egg weights. Cystine and methinionine supplementation inconsistently improved egg weights during Phase 3 whereas trace mineral supplementation had no effects on egg weight.
Feather scores by both feather quality scales (Webster and Hurnik‘s for overall or Tauson’s for five different areas of the body) did not show any dietary amino acid or trace mineral treatment effects. Age significantly affected feather scores as one might expect. After 46 weeks of age, feather scores significantly decreased by both scales, reaching a low point by 64 weeks of age. Feather scores significantly rebounded following the molt but were not positively influenced by the dietary treatments.
Conclusion
High levels of methionine or cystine supplementation had positive effects on egg production and egg size. Cystine was as effective as methionine at the highest treatment levels. Unfortunately, the levels of methionine and cystine supplementation used in this trial were not able to prevent normal age-related feather loss in this population of white leghorn hens. The practice of non-restriction molting did improve feather quality and scores for a period of time following the molt regime.
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mikey
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2008, 11:26:08 AM »

News
Ostrich production struggling in Botswana// 21 Apr 2008

The sole ostrich abattoir in Botswana is still unable to reach its target of slaughtering 1,160 birds per month.


 
The plant re-opened in October 2007 and managed to slaughter a total of 1182 birds from October last year to February.
According to abattoir manager Freeman Mogaga, farmers are unable to meet the target due to limited infrastructure, unreliable feed supply and unavailability of chicks.
He went on to say that few ostrich farms, inadequate training and high start-up costs were among the problems affecting ostrich production in the region. However, he said the Ministry of Agriculture should aid this industry with more funding, subsidise ostrich farming start-up cost and adequate infrastructure and training.
He also called on farmers to invest more, devote more time and efforts in ostrich farming as well as liaise with the ministry officials on better and profitable farming techniques.
It is reported that the ostrich meat is sold locally, as well as to countries such as Belgium, and the skins sold to Asia and South Africa.
Source: Republic of Botswana website
 
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mikey
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2008, 11:27:49 AM »

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Pakistan: use wheat for food not poultry feed// 21 Apr 2008


The use of wheat as an ingredient for poultry feed could worsen the present crisis of flour in Pakistan, according to the Ministry of Food Agriculture and Livestock.


 
With last year's wheat crisis, poultry feed manufacturers were only allowed to use maize as one of the ingredients rather than wheat, but because maize was more costly this rule did not work. Feed millers therefore stored wheat, which could not be used for the flour mills anymore.
However, according to agricultural experts the recent rain almost across the country will increase the production rate of the wheat crop.
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2008, 11:29:26 AM »

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US poultry facilities approved to export to Russia// 21 Apr 2008


USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service has stated that Russia has added more pork and poultry facilities to its list of eligible exporters.


 
Poultry originating from Ashland Cold Storage and House of Raeford-Wallace Division inTeachey , N.C. , can be exported to Russia .
L&K Packing International, a Schleswig, Iowa-based cutting/packaging plant and cold storage facilities owned by Chicago-based Ashland Cold Storage and Richland, Miss.-based Millard Refrigerated Services are now eligible to export pork to Russia.
 



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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2008, 11:31:08 AM »

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Huge hatchery built in Russia// 18 Apr 2008


HatchTech Incubation Technology and Russian based ‘GAP Resource’ owned by Victor Nauruzov, have agreed upon the construction of a brand new turnkey hatchery facility, with a production capacity of 80 million eggs per year.


 
After delivering a 35 million egg/year hatchery in the end of 2006, GAP Resource once more confirms its trust in HatchTech. This trust is, according to GAP Resource, based on excellent hatching results and reliable first-rate (Russian speaking) after sales service.
HatchTech will deliver a turnkey hatchery including 36 HatchTech MicroClimer Setters (cap.126720 eggs), 18 HatchTech MicroClimer Hatchers (cap. 42240 eggs) and the complete system for ventilation, cooling and heating. A ‘hatchery management system’ will secure efficient energy usage and proper ventilation and incubation.
Founded in 2002, GAP Resource is a leading, fast growing producer of poultry meat in the Southern regions of Russia. Currently GAP Resource consists out of 2 feed mills, 11 breeding and broiler enterprises and 2 processing plants producing 60,000 tonnes of meat per year. GAP Resource has a range of 40 brands of broiler meat products that are distributed in Moscow and all Southern regions of Russia.
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mikey
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« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2008, 11:33:41 AM »

China enhances poultry subsidies // 18 Apr 2008


According to American Agriculturalist, state-controlled media has reported that China's government will give subsidies worth millions of yuan to boost production on large pig and chicken breeding units.
 


 
Citing the central government's National Development & Reform Commission, Xinhua news agency reported that breeder chicken units will see up to 1 million yuan depending on their scale of production.

 

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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2008, 01:11:14 PM »

Amino acids, trace minerals and feathers
// 23 apr 2008

Recently completed research* funded by the US Poultry & Egg Association studied the effects of dietary sulfur amino acids and trace minerals on feather cover in laying hens.

Feather cover is important for its insulation value and protection from scratches and injury to the hen’s skin.

In commercial settings, surveys indicate a rapid deterioration in feather cover after the hens are about 40 weeks of age, with some recovery after molt and then again a rapid deterioration during the second cycle of egg production.

The United Egg Producers Animal Husbandry Guidelines also note the importance of adequate feather cover for the welfare of the laying hen.

Objectives
The objectives of the research were to test the level of cystine and methionine supplementation necessary to optimise feather cover during the first and second cycles of egg production, and to investigate the effects of supplemental selenium (Se) or zinc (Zn) on feather cover through the first and second cycles of egg production.

Results
Egg production (EP) was significantly affected by dietary amino acid treatment during all three phases of production. During Phase 1, EP was greatest for hens on the control diet (low methionine and basal cystine) or high cystine diets.

During Phase 2, EP was greatest for hens fed the highest level of methionine supplementation. There was no benefit to cystine supplementation during Phase 2.

During Phase 3, positive effects of high levels of methionine or cystine supplementation were quite apparent for improved egg production.

Trace mineral supplementation had a transitory effect on egg production during Phase 2 of the study, showing improved EP when hens were fed inorganic Se combined with 100 ppm Zn from Bioplex.

Egg weights were only significantly affected during Phase 2, at which time hens fed the highest level of methionine had the greatest egg weights.

Cystine and methinionine supplementation inconsistently improved egg weights during Phase 3 whereas trace mineral supplementation had no effects on egg weight.

Feather scores by both feather quality scales (Webster and Hurnik‘s for overall or Tauson’s for five different areas of the body) did not show any dietary amino acid or trace mineral treatment effects.

Age significantly affected feather scores as one might expect. After 46 weeks of age, feather scores significantly decreased by both scales, reaching a low point by 64 weeks of age.

Feather scores significantly rebounded following the molt but were not positively influenced by the dietary treatments.

Conclusion
High levels of methionine or cystine supplementation had positive effects on egg production and egg size.

Cystine was as effective as methionine at the highest treatment levels. Unfortunately, the levels of methionine and cystine supplementation used in this trial were not able to prevent normal age-related feather loss in this population of white leghorn hens.

The practice of non-restriction molting did improve feather quality and scores for a period of time following the molt regime.

* Effects of Dietary Sulfur Amino Acids and Trace Minerals on Feather Cover in Laying Hens, by Sheila E. Scheideler, Ph.D., Department of Animal Science,

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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2008, 08:09:43 AM »

Tuesday, April 29, 2008Print This Page
Ontario Renews Partnership with University of Guelph
CANADA - The partnership between the Ontario government and the University of Guelph that resulted in the Omega-3 egg is being renewed and improved.



Under an agreement announced today, the university will receive C$300 million over the next five years to help it continue its top-notch agri-food and rural research and development programs, animal health and food testing services, and veterinary education. This is in addition to C$56 million in one-time funding announced in the 2008 Ontario Budget.

The partnership also provides Ontario with improved methods to detect animal diseases such as rabies and tuberculosis, protecting lives and livelihoods.

"This renewed partnership is good news for our agri-food sector and focuses on research and innovation to better protect our health, economy and environment," Ontario's Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Leona Dombrowsky said.

"This significant and strategic investment is indicative of the forward-thinking innovation strategy of the Ontario government and Minister Dombrowsky," said University of Guelph President Alastair Summerlee.

"This increased commitment will allow the partnership to generate even more than the current C$1-billion it has been returning every year for the past 10 years."



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« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2008, 11:30:48 AM »

Deception in Plumped up Poultry
US - Many companies plump up poultry meat by injecting them with a broth to make them taste tastier and more tender, but this practice also adds water weight and sodium.


According to TriCities, Consumer Reports found chicken and turkey products with up to 30 percent of their weight from broth, flavoring solution, or water. Plus sodium levels were far higher than in poultry that hadn’t been juiced up.

A Prestage Premium Young Turkey Breast “contains approximately 15%” of a solution. At a cost of $14.61 that means you could be paying up to $2.19 for the added liquid. And an enhanced turkey has a hefty 390 milligrams of sodium per serving.

Consumer Reports took a look at a package of Tyson Chicken Wing Sections. “100% All Natural” is in large print, but look closer at the fine print and you’ll find “contains up to 12% broth.” Seventy percent of people Consumer Reports surveyed last year said that they think the label “natural” should mean no salt water is added. For now, though, if you want to avoid extra sodium or paying for liquid in poultry, you need to read labels carefully.

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« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2008, 11:32:58 AM »

What Do Chicken Labels Really Say?
US — Buying chicken these days is not like it used to be. With labels like “100 percent natural,” “organic,” “grain-fed,” and “free range,” many consumers don’t really know what they’re buying.


According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)—“100 percent natural” means the poultry doesn’t contain artificial ingredients like preservatives. But experts warn—there are no guarantees.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*
"100 percent natural—remember—no inspections are done. So we don’t know if those claims are really true" 
Shannon Wallace, R.D., registered dietitian with Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
“100 percent natural—remember—no inspections are done. So we don’t know if those claims are really true,” says Shannon Wallace, R.D., registered dietitian with Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

Chicken labeled as “organic” must meet much stricter standards. Inspections are conducted and organic chicken cannot contain artificial ingredients, hormones or antibiotics. But are those really harmful to consumers?

“The USDA does not make any claims that organically produced food is any safer or more nutritious than conventionally produced food,” adds Wallace.

Another popular chicken label—“grain fed.” This is supposed to mean the chicken was not fed animal by-products, but just like “100 percent natural” and “free range,” there is no outside monitoring for this claim.

And probably the most confusing label of them all—“free range.” Chicken labeled as “free range” is supposed to be leaner, but again, experts warn the claim can be deceiving.

“Free range does not always mean that the animal has been in an open area its whole life. It may only mean they were in a restricted area and let out into that open area one time during their life,” says Wallace.

So what should you shop for in chicken?

“If you would like to have a healthy diet—trimming the fat or buying leaner cuts of meat is always important. And the research is still out regarding these other issues of hormones and antibiotics,” says Wallace.

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