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mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2008, 11:40:11 AM »
Too much soy can damage cells
// 08 apr 2008

A diet with high concentrations of soy can have negative consequences for humans as well as animals, according to German researchers.

 
Certain hormonally active ingredients called isoflavones might give problems, said the Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals (FBN) in Dummerstorf near Rostock.

Trials with pigs muscle cells with a FBN developed procedure revealed that high doses of isoflavones can damage the cells, said FBN project leader Charlotte Rehfeldt.

However, low concentrations of isoflavones had positive growth effects. Because of similar metabolism systems similar effects can be expected in humans.

Other studies have shown that the isoflavones genistein and daidzein have positive hormonal effects, but also can damage intestinal cells. Rehfeldts said that to reduce the harmful properties of soy in specific therapies is to remove genistein and daidzein from the soy products.

According to the German Society for Nutrition infant food on soybean basis should only be given on medically justified indications, she said.







mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2008, 07:57:49 AM »
Tuesday, April 22, 2008Print This Page
Food for Thought: Does Meat Cause Hunger?
WORLDWIDE - Not bio-fuel, but animals raised for meat are the main reason for the growing shortage of food in the world claims Pune Maharahtra. One-third of the annual global food production is used for feeding animals specially bred and fattened to be killed for their flesh. If the crops fed to them were to be consumed by humans, there would be no shortage.



Pune Maharahtra is a writer for Beauty Without Cruelty (BWC), she says the world is on the verge of a global food crisis. Economists are questioning how fair it is to use land to grow corn, etc., for the production of bio-fuel when people increasingly don't have enough to eat. Fuel is, but a lesser reason for this deep-rooted problem.




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"If the crops fed to them were to be consumed by humans, there would be no shortage of food." 
Pune Maharahtra.
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"The main reason for the growing shortage of food needs to be tackled: animals specially bred and fattened to be killed for meat. If the crops fed to them were to be consumed by humans, there would be no shortage of food. As much as one-third of the approximately 2000 million tons of annual global food production is used for feeding these animals for their flesh." Claims Pune Maharahtra.

The feed-to-meat ratio varies depending upon species (poultry, pigs, cattle, sheep & goats) and whether produced in a developed or developing country, but on an average 4 kilograms of feed yields only 1 kilogram of meat.

Moreover, the FAO has stated that the world's livestock production is 18% more responsible for global warming than all transport emissions. It causes wide-scale land degradation, uses large quantities of the earth's increasingly scarce water resources, pollutes land, water and air, and is responsible for excessive use of energy, all of which are downright harmful to our environment.

Pune Maharahtra says the environmentalists are not the only ones who are showing deep concern. "Emerging markets' central banks and governments are no longer ignoring rising food prices coupled with low stocks of rice and wheat (inflation and hoarding) and protests of shortages resulting in social tensions. They know that converting land produce to meat is an expensive business, the direct effect of which is a steep rise in grain prices which hits the poor most."



mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2008, 07:44:24 AM »
 Thursday, April 24, 2008   
 
 

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‘Pakistan will excel in livestock production’

LAHORE: Pakistan will be a prominent focal point in the world with regard to livestock production in the coming days, said Governor Lt Gen (r) Khalid Maqbool.

He was addressing at the concluding session of a two-day International Livestock and Poultry Congress on Wednesday. The governor said that America and Europe had set up heavy machinery industry instead of dairy farming, due to which prices of food items were increasing rapidly. “It is a golden opportunity for us to enhance our potential in agriculture and livestock and get the share of the international market,” he added.

Maqbool said that Pakistan could prosper through breeding of cattle on a commercial basis. He said that there was a lot of potential for the promotion of sheep, goats, fish and chickens in the country, and 14 billion eggs had been brought to the market from the existing hatcheries of Pakistan in a year. He said that government was paying special attention to the promotion of the livestock sector. staff report



 
 

mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2008, 01:00:46 PM »
Landliebe to launch natural feed concept
// 25 apr 2008

Dairy producer Landliebe (Germany) will be launching a completely new yet wholly traditional cattle feed concept as a major extension of its quality and origin programme during the second half of this year.
 
From July onwards, all Landliebe’s fresh milk, long-life milk and school milk will come from cows fed exclusively on locally produced cattle feed.

Landliebe will be the first German dairy brand to introduce such a concept. The feed, which will come from Germany and its EU neighbours, will be made from crops that have always traditionally been grown by German farmers.

Preparations for the new concept are now well under way. Many of Landliebe’s dairy farmers in Nordrhein-Westfalen are keenly interested in the new scheme, as are compound feed manufacturers.

Incentive for farmers
Approximately 450 dairy farmers throughout the federal state are taking part in the new initiative. They will be paid an allowance to take part in the scheme. This will provide an incentive and help them to identify with the brand.

The Landliebe milk will be collected separately from regular milk at the selected farms. It will also be treated and processed separately at the production facility in Cologne.

Landliebe’s farmers live and work in rural areas such as the Bergische Land, Sauerland and neighbouring regions. The grass and other feed they give their cows, such as corn and grain, is all locally grown.

Only EU-produced materials
The concentrates that dairy farmers use as feed supplements may only contain inputs that come from Germany or the European Union. The basic ration for cows (meadow grass, feed crops, grass and corn-based silage) must also be home-grown.

The other feed components required by the cow will be produced either in the EU or in Germany, and will not be imported from overseas.

The specifications governing the new feed concept have been agreed with the dairy farmers in a supplementary contract to the milk supply system.

Inspection of the additional feed purchased and ensuring that it is separately stored will be a key part of this agreement.

Landliebe is one of the biggest-selling daily fresh milk brands in Germany. Landliebe stands for healthy enjoyment and for the highest quality milk with no artificial additives, preservatives or food gelatines.


mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2008, 01:03:35 PM »
FDA tightens use of cattle parts in feed
// 25 apr 2008

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ruled out the use of high-risk materials from cattle 30 months of age or older for use in all animal feed. This will prevent any accidental cross-contamination between ruminant feed and non-ruminant feed or feed ingredients.

US makers of pet food and all other animal feed will be prevented from using certain materials from cattle at the greatest risk for spreading mad cow disease under a rule that regulators finalized on Wednesday.

Contamination could occur during manufacture, transport or through the accidental misfeeding of non-ruminant feed to ruminant animals.

Canada and the United States already banned the use of protein from cows and other ruminant animals such as goats and sheep in cattle feed in 1997, following a mad cow outbreak in Britain.

The final rule, to be published in today's edition of the federal register, bans cattle parts including:

The entire carcass of BSE-positive cattle
The brains and spinal cords from cattle 30 months of age and older
The entire carcass of cattle not inspected and passed for human consumption that are 30 months of age or older and from which brains and spinal cords were not removed
Tallow derived from BSE-positive cattle
Tallow derived from other materials prohibited by this rule that contains more than 0.15 percent insoluble impurities
Mechanically separated beef derived from the materials prohibited by this rule.
The revised rule, amending FDA's 1997 ruminant feed ban, is aimed at further enhancing safeguards against BSE and will go into effect April 27, 2009. It was proposed Oct. 6, 2005, and FDA said it received more than 840 comments.


mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2008, 01:07:09 PM »
Potential for soybean meal in aquafeed
// 24 apr 2008

Aquaculture represents great potential for soybean meal, because aquaculture is the fastest-growing animal-food-producing sector, consuming soybean meal from over 250 million bushels of soybeans.


The United Soybean Board (USB) and the soybean checkoff continue developing new uses and new demand for soybeans in all lands of the world, and even the ocean holds great potential for soy.


Soybean meal has increasingly become a key ingredient in fish feeds as the aquaculture industry strives to meet global demand for its products thanks in part to checkoff research and marketing efforts.


"Fish meal is getting scarce and more costly, creating a market opportunity for more soybean meal to be used as a protein source in fish and shrimp diets," says Bill Coppess, USB director and a soybean farmer from Ansonia, OH. "Soy diets can also decrease the mercury levels in seafood, helping to alleviate some health concerns."


In the United States, each person eats about 16.5 pounds (7.5 kg) of fish and shellfish each year, including about 4.4 pounds (2 kg) of shrimp. The U.S. consumes about 1.4 billion pounds (634,000 tonnes) of shrimp annually.


"Crustaceans represent about 4 percent of aquaculture products worldwide, but represent about 20 percent of the value," says Karen Fear, USB director and a soybean farmer from Montpelier, IN.


"That's why the soybean checkoff is working with shrimp farmers around the world to find ways for more soy to be used in shrimp diets."

The soybean checkoff also works to incorporate soy into all species of farmed fish.

 

Ocean capture fisheries, which have long provided the majority of edible fish products for the world, have reached maximum sustainable yields.
This means that any expansion will have to come from aquaculture, and using soy as an aquafeed will be a big part of that expansion.

 


mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2008, 01:15:31 PM »
Enough grain in Europe
// 24 apr 2008

The latest report from the European Commission on the prospects for agricultural markets and incomes suggests an increase in returns to growers in the medium term and rising production. In 2010 production is projected to reach 293.6 million tonnes, rising to 305 million tonnes by 2014.
 
Consumption will also grow, but at a more modest rate, and is expected to reach 272.9 million tonnes in 2010 and over 285 million tonnes in 2014.

On current trends the EU will actually have end stocks in 2014 of 56 million tonnes, compared with the 40.4 million tonnes last year.

There are two main reasons behind the prospects of rising production. The reforms of the Common Agricultural Policy made an ending of intervention buying for maize. And the ending of set-aside – the measure through which farmers were obliged to take land out of cultivation to avoid surpluses having to be placed in store at taxpayers' expense – has made more land available for cereal growing.
 
Production forecast
For 2008 Paris-based Strategie Grains is forecasting that wheat production in the EU will be in the region of 128 million tonnes, which is well up on the 111.6 million tonnes of last year.

Consumption of wheat is expected to be about 118 million tonnes, up on last year as livestock farmers switch from using maize.

Barley production is expected to show a modest increase of 900,000 tonnes to 61.54 million tonnes in the EU.

Last year cereal production in the EU reached 256 million tonnes, but consumption exceeded this production with ten million tonnes. The gap was filled by imports.

Of total consumption of 265.6 million tonnes some 165.2 million tonnes were used in animal feed.

Growth in the East
Production in the newer EU member states is expected to rise considerably as technical efficiency improves and farm sizes become larger. The land in parts of Hungary and Poland is ideally suited to growing crops and as newer varieties are adopted yields will rise.

High costs
Although more land will be available, the costs for farmers are rising. Fertilisers are expensive and the scarcity of phosphorous is really becoming a worldwide problem.

Some of the major fertiliser manufacturing countries, notably Russia and China, have placed restrictions on exports and this is having a major impact on the market.
 

mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2008, 08:29:11 AM »
AgFeed buys several pig farms in China
// 17 apr 2008

China's AgFeed Industries, Inc. has signed agreements to acquire majority ownership of several commercial pig farms located in south China provinces. AgFeed anticipates these acquisitions will close by early May 2008.

 
AgFeed has agreed to pay, on average, less than 3 times projected 2008 net income for these businesses.

The new acquisitions are expected to generate approximately 390,000 in annual pig production for AgFeed. The Company anticipates that this additional production will add approximately 250,000 pig sales to its 2008 revenues.

AgFeed previously provided guidance indicating that it would achieve approximately 120,000 pig sales in 2008 from its currently existing pig farm operations.

mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2008, 11:34:01 AM »
Meat and bone meal still present in UK
// 30 apr 2008

UK government officials have admitted that animal feed containing meat and bone meal has been distributed across the country twelve years after it was banned due to its risk of BSE contamination, Farmers Guardian reports.


The Government’s Animal Health agency has launched an investigation into the slip-up and is currently tracing the contaminated feed to farms and mills across the country. Animals that have been fed on contaminated feed could face compulsory slaughter in compliance with EU regulation.

"The materials involved are muscle fibre, animal bone and fish bone," read a statement on the Defra website. "This incident relates entirely to animal feed materials and a veterinary risk assessment is being conducted to determine if there is any risk to animal health. There is currently no evidence of any risk to public health."

The wheat feed, produced in Sweden, arrived into London’s Tilbury Docks in March before being distributed to merchants and feed mills throughout the country.

The Food Standards Agency alerted the feed industry last week after routine samples from a feed business operator revealed traces of meat and bone meal. Any contamination would put the Government in breach of the EU’s TSE and animal by-products legislation that was put in place to keep diseases such as BSE at bay.

Meat and bone meal was banned from cattle and sheep feed in 1988 and the ban was extended to all animal feed in 1996 after it was linked to the BSE outbreak. The epidemic reached its peak in 1992 when Britain confirmed 36,680 new BSE cases. Surveillance is ongoing and in the first four months of this year testing has revealed BSE in thirteen cattle and two sheep.

 


mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #24 on: May 01, 2008, 11:38:32 AM »
On a global scale it is estimated that annual global feed production is around 614 million tonnes, but this is only the registered production and often integrated production is not calculated. Furthermore it is estimated that there are 3,800 feedmills worldwide, which appear to produce 80% of all the feed. This means an average production of 13,000 tonnes per mill per year.

mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2008, 11:41:04 AM »
Feed prices boost demand for pellet binders
// 30 apr 2008

Rising prices are stimulating producers to consider different raw materials for their animal feed formulations. This can, in some situations, adversely affect pellet quality, and reduce throughput at the feed mill press according to agricultural specialists Kiotechagil.

 
With electricity at 0.16 USD per kilowatt-hour and rising, feed compounders are also paying increasing attention to energy usage. Double pelleting for example costs an extra 1.6USD per tonne compared to single pelleting comments Mark Meynell, Director of Lloyds Animal Feeds.

These two factors are increasing the demand for low inclusion pellet binders," says Kiotechagil’s chief technical officer Murray Hyden. "Part of the benefit comes through the chemical binding attributes which help lower the amount of energy consumed in pellet production. This is achieved by improved die lubrication and a reduction in fines losses."

Feed producers are also recognising the ability of binders (such as Mastercube), which improve pellet quality and allow greater inclusion of oils in high-energy diets, said Mr Hyden. "Farmers too are looking to protect their investment in quality feeds by seeking out improved pellet durability and the more consistent pellet quality they achieve when using low inclusion pellet binders."






mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2008, 09:18:34 AM »
Salmon pigment authorised as feed additive
// 02 may 2008

The European Commission has authorised the use of astaxanthin dimethyldisuccinate – a carotenoid pigment – as a feed additive. This pigment is already used to make the flesh of farmed salmon and trout appear orangey-pink.

 
The official authorisation appeared in the Official Journal of the European Union today (1 May). The European Food Safety Authority last year concluded that use of the additive has no adverse effect on animal health, human health or the environment.

But the regulation stipulates that if it is mixed with canthaxanthin – another carotenoid – the total concentration of the mixture should not exceed 100 grams per kilo in fish-feed. In 2003 the EU limited permitted levels of canthaxantin following health fears linking use of the carotenoid pigment to eye defects.

In addition to be being used to colour the flesh of farmed salmon and trout canthaxantin is also used to make chicken skin and egg yolks appear more yellow. Authorisation takes effect 20 days after the publication of the regulation in the 1 May edition of the EU's Official Journal.



mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2008, 09:21:42 AM »
Animal Feed & Animal Nutrition News Recycling chromium for poultry feed
// 05 may 2008

A research project has received funding for a pilot study on the removal of highly carcinogenic chromium from the leather wastes that are used in the manufacture of poultry feed.


The Tamil Nadu State Council for Science and Technology, Chennai, has awarded the Rs1.10-lakh research project to Dr P.N. Sudha, Professor of Chemistry, Dhanabagyam Krishnaswamy Mudaliar College for Women, Vellore. According to Dr. Sudha, the two-year project is aimed at the removal of chromium from leather wastes through a cost-effective method.

Leather shavings, owing to high protein content, are often used in the manufacture of poultry feed, along with corn flour. It was found, after an analysis of the poultry feed collected from different chicken shops, that the samples contained very high concentration of chromium. Chickens that ate the feed were often found to have high levels of chromium in different parts of the body.

Land filling of leather wastes caused pollution of the environment since leaching of the wastes resulted in polluting the land and the water resources in the vicinity. The use of the leather wastes as chicken feed was a good alternative, provided the chromium and other toxic substances were properly removed, she said.






mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2008, 09:23:45 AM »
Animal Feed & Animal Nutrition News Novus joins trade mission to Vietnam
// 05 may 2008

Novus International Inc., participated in a recent trade mission to Vietnam with Missouri Department of Agriculture Director, Katie Smith. At the request of Missouri Governor Matt Blunt, Director Smith led the mission to assist Missouri based companies and suppliers in the expanding Vietnam feed industry.


With a population of 85 million people, Vietnam has the fastest growing economy in Asia. "The U.S. exported a record $624 million in agricultural, fish and forest products to the country last year. That was almost a ten-fold increase in exports since 2000. Missouri’s long-term vision and commitment to Vietnam has resulted in opening new markets and increased sales," said Director Smith.

The mission included tours of 5 new feed mills, the countries largest swine producer, and an aquaculture operation. The aquaculture and swine industries are considered pivotal to the success of the Vietnamese agricultural industry. In 2007, it is estimated that Vietnam produced 1.2 million tons of catfish surpassing the sectors forecast for 2010. The pig is considered the dominant livestock in Vietnam. It is estimated that pork contributes over 70% of the total meat production for the country.

"This mission, along with our recent decision to construct an Aqua Research Facility on the Nong Lam University campus, illustrate our commitment to the continued development of agriculture in Vietnam and other Asian countries," explained Thad Simons, President and Chief Executive Officer of Novus International, Inc.




mikey

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Re: WorldWatch:
« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2008, 09:25:55 AM »
Animal Feed & Animal Nutrition News Dutch dairy coop to use sustainable soy
// 05 may 2008

Friesland Foods, one of the largest dairy coops in the Netherlands, has said that from 2009 on it will only allow soy to be fed to its cows that has been grown according to sustainability standards.
 
With this decision it refutes the arguments of the Dutch Nature and Environment Foundation, which said that Friesland Foods only talks about sustainable soy but does not act.

Friesland Foods will purchase its soy from areas that not have been deforested for creating arable land. Furthermore the dairy company not only said this, but also demands that the farmers and labourers in Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay are on standard.

This is also one of the reasons Friesland Foods participates in the Round Table for Sustainable Soy production.

The other main dairy producer in the Netherlands, Campina, already in 2006 committed itself to the use of sustainable soy for its dairy cows. The coop used 10,000 tonnes in 2006 and 33,000 tonnes of sustainable soy in 2007.

Campina wants to switch completely to the use of sustainable soy in 2011. This will require a volume of 150,000 tonnes.

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