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doods
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« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2008, 06:49:52 PM »

Doods,goats are bred with the natives to improve milk and meat qualities.The native in general has better disease resistance,when upgraded or crossbred,one is looking for offspring that will have better qualities.One can breed for milk or meat or both.I will say,once you have bred up to a F3,there is very little native left in the blood lines.Plus its a cost factor.One good breeding buck can service a fair number of doe goats.
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hi sir..good day to you...sir is there any possibility a doe will get pregnant if we force them to mate even if they are not in heat?is there any bad effect to kid?
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nemo
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« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2008, 09:14:37 PM »

it will not get pregnant because there will be no ovum in the reproductive tract of the animal. the heat of the animal is a sign that a ova will be released. So, its a way the animal is saying you need to breed her.

Injuries would result from force mating. Sprain, wounds etc..
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doods
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« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2008, 06:33:04 PM »

it will not get pregnant because there will be no ovum in the reproductive tract of the animal. the heat of the animal is a sign that a ova will be released. So, its a way the animal is saying you need to breed her.

Injuries would result from force mating. Sprain, wounds etc..
thank you doc...
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mikey
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« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2008, 11:35:05 AM »

 HARDINESS
Kalahari Reds are ideally suited to the harsh and outstretched conditions of large parts of South Africa (SA). In SA they are bred in harsh conditions, arid and semi-desert areas. To prevail under these conditions, animals must be sun-resistant and hardy. Over the years, a natural selection process has ensured that only the fittest animals have survived and very little artificial selection took place.
Kalahari Red's are a distinct and separate breed of Goat (as verified by DNA testing for SA Stud Book). They are not related to the Boer Goat (don't believe anyone that tells you so) and have additional advantages to the original boer goat breed - they can enhance the tenderness of the meat, the hardiness of the animal and the camouflage and hence the survival of their kids. 
 
Their excellent mobility allows them to walk far in search of food and water. They feed on a vast variety of plants and are resistant to disease and parasites. Kalahari Reds are less susceptible to diseases and need to be inoculated and dosed far less than other breeds, which makes them easy to care for and less labour intensive. The limited use of vaccines makes the production of organically produced meat possible. A further bonus is lean meat with an excellent taste and texture.
 
 
MOTHER ABILITIES
Doe's have excellent mothering instincts and kid right in the field and raise their kids there. No labourers are needed to assist does to find their young. In SA selection is made strongly in favour of these attributes because kids that are properly cared for by their mothers will do likewise for their own progeny. Through natural selection processes, only the fittest mothers have survived. The does are fertile and produce plenty of milk and, as a result, the kids grow fast. Breeders select for twins that are usually of equal strength.   
To prevent kid mortalities as a result of an inability to suck, breeders select specifically for well-developed and properly attached teats. Generally, newborn kids are strong and have a strong urge to suck. They herd well and animals flock together. They breed all year round and will kid three times every two years.
COLOUR
Kalahari Reds can be used to give indigenous goats a uniform, solid red colour, with all the unique advantages that this brings. Their earthy colour provides a good camouflage that protects them from predators. White kids would be seen easily by foxes, pigs and eagles. They are fully pigmented and, therefore, able to endure heat and strong sunshine. Their dark coats and long ears provide good heat resistance and will, therefore, feed for longer during the heat of the day, which ultimately means higher weight gains.

SIZE
The commercial goat farmer can cross-breed Kalahari Reds to improve the carcass mass of indigenous goats. This means more meat per hectare.

They are tall and long, which gives them excellent mobility. As they are taller than most other goats they can take advantage of more feed. Their carcass size is similar to the SA Boer goat. The average weight of a buck is as much as 115kg, while does reach 75kg. Kids grow fast. In Australia, young kids show weight gains of 1.5kg per week, with some even exceeding 400g per day.

 I have spoken to a boer breeder in Canada,tells me that the red boer is a kalahari red,plain and simple.If one bred 2 reds together,only a small percentage of kids are born red.He tells me that the red comes from the painted or traditional boers.Some say this and some say that,who really knows what the truth is here.I know one thing tho.Kalahari reds are registered under a boer title,makes me think,why are they not registered under their own title, Kalahari Red.Who knows?Even in N.America,the reds are worth more than the painted.
 
 
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mikey
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« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2008, 11:49:23 AM »

Kalahari Reds
Hardiness and disease/tick resistance
Mothering and milking abilities
Colour, shape and size
Good meat flavour & good yield
Most Tender Goat Meat available.
Excellent natural weed control
Fence trained & call to feed.
We have found that Kalahari Red Goats generally are a hardier animal than the Boer or Boer cross animals. Many of the Boer cross animals we've had on the property have been used to being pampered and being hand fed and tend to loose weight and are ill thrift when just grazing on pasture.

Our Kalahari cross animals on the other hand thrive on rough weed country with little or no supplements. Given the rainfall in our area we have a strategic worm control program and also vaccination program for our breeding stock.

We have also found that due to our high rainfall that Pure Nubian goats also have difficulty surviving due to a lower worm resistance. We have however crossed our Kalahari Red Goats with Nubians to increase length and height plus infused excellent colouring/patterned coats for camouflage and also improved milking.

Pricing and Breeding:
Our Kalahari Red Goats are sold based on % of Kalahari breeding. That is an Nubian Goat crossed with a Full Blood Kalahari (KR) Buck would result in a Grade 1 (or 50%) Kalahari kid, and so forth. The grading up table looks as follows:

Grade 1 Kid - 50% KR (Females Stud register able)

= Foundation Goat + KR Buck

 

Grade 2 Kid  - 75% KR (Females Stud Register able)

= Grade 1 Doe + KR Buck

 

Grade 3 Kid - 87.5% KR (Females Stud Register able)

= Grade 2 Doe + KR Buck

 

Grade 4 Kid - 93.75% KR (Females PB Stud Register able)

= Grade 3 Doe + KR Buck

 

Pure breed Kid - 96.88% KR (All Stud Register able)

Grade 4 Doe+ KR Buck

 

We also have Full Blood animals that are not graded up, ie. 100% traceable Kalahari Red heritage. We only used Full Blood Kalahari Red Bucks in our grading program and also quality foundation animals from Nubian and Boer goats.

As a guide: Wether are sold by the Kg approx $2.85 per kg live weight. We can arrange butchering and delivery which equates to approx. $5.50 per kg dressed weight + delivery fee.

As a starting point Grade 1 Breeding Does (registered) & Bucks range from approx $220ea+

All our prices are plus GST and include registration with South African Stud Book, service papers (where applicable) and registration document. Delivery and Transport insurance can also be arranged. (Kalahari Red animals are also able to be registered as stud animals with the Australian Boer Goat Breeders Association).

 
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mikey
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« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2008, 06:13:05 AM »

   
 
           
       
   Living Up to and Exceeding  -  its Heritage 
     
 The kiko meat goat breed stands apart from all other meat goat breeds in the world. It is the ONLY meat goat breed in the world developed solely for the economical production of goat meat with minimal intervention on native forage. While other breeds have been created and bred based on specific phenotypes (looks) the Kiko breed's focus is based on the function or performance of the animal. 
     
  The Past ...   
     
    The Kiko meat goat breed was introduced to the World at the 4th International Congress on Goats (Brazilia, Brazil) in 1987. The Kiko was developed in New Zealand as a performance meat goat breed. The New Zealand kiko breed developers wanted a goat that could produce with minimal intervention and inputs for commercial goat meat production. The kiko was developed using a breeding program referred to as "population genetics with an open nucleus".

The population or foundation herd was New Zealand's feral goats stringently selected for production/performance on native forage with no intervention or inputs. The open nucleus allowed for the incorporation of large framed dairy males to increase both frame size and amount of milk. The result was a larger framed meat goat that could produce on forage with no intervention or inputs. The BEST and first production meat goat breed on the planet! 
 
       
                             
      The Present ...               
     
The kiko was imported into the US in the early 90's but did not catch wide acclaim until after the year 2000. During this time the Kiko was placed into forage based buck performance tests and independent university research projects and the results clearly indicated the unique "Kiko Advantage" of function over form with the ability to produce with minimal intervention and inputs on native vegetation. Production above all else! Meat goat research at Tennessee State University has consistently shown the unique performance advantages of the kiko over other breeds.
 
     
 
  MGR was instrumental in gathering up  the first fullblood kiko does to be placed in research at TSU - 2001 
   
 
     
Today many Kiko breeders still practice the New Zealand breed standard of "population genetics with an open nucleus" thus allowing them to breed both the original import bloodlines and the American bred up bloodlines in their continual development of a true production meat goat breed. A breed that becomes static is a dying breed.
   
                             
    The future of the kiko breed is unlimited. A performance breed, with the focus on the function of the animal rather the "look" of the animal, has unlimited potential as long as the breeders are breeding based on performance. Not numbers, or looks, or pedigree, or names, but PERFORMANCE. 
         
       
 The Kiko Pedigree Associate Breeders ~ Breeding the Contemporary Breed of the Future 
   
Each breeder can use their unique herd as their foundation genetics and incorporate an open nucleus to allow them to continually create a better kiko meat goat breed - “the best production meat goat breed on the planet.” The Kiko Pedigree™ provides breeders with a registry that allows for documentation of individual animal performance and encourages breeders to both collect on farm data and participate in off farm independent performance testing.

The Kiko Pedigree ™ was the first kiko registry to incorporate the Performance Ratio into the registration certificate. This tool allows breeders a method to document and rate the individual goat's performance in their herd. It is by knowing which genetics are above average that we can select for the superior kikos of tomorrow. The Kiko Pedigree ™ is also the first kiko registry which mandates that "NO" animal will be registered before its six- month birth day. This encourages breeders to collect the weight data and also to look at the actual overall performance of the animal (growth, hardiness, thriftiness). Not just the ability to survive but to thrive. We believe that the kiko meat goat breed is the key to advancing the meat goat industry and that the breed itself will continue to move forward with breeders who place a high priority on continually breeding those kiko goats that meet or exceed the criteria used when the breed was established.

Today's kiko breeders are creating the kiko meat goat breed of tomorrow. Building on the breeds foundation of function over form, breeders must also ever select for increased carcass cutability on native vegetation. The Kiko Pedigree Associate Breeders recognize the importance of each breeding and management decision and how it can affect the future performance of the breed. The breeders of the best production meat goat breed on the planet......and beyond! We welcome all those interested in raising kiko goats and advancing the kiko breed.
         
                             
    Copyright© 2005 Ruble C. Conatser, Jr.   
   
                   
                             
     
 
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mikey
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« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2008, 06:19:59 AM »

 Breed Standards of the Boer Goat 
 The following are the breed standards as drawn up and accepted by the Boer Breeders Association of South Africa. The aim of the breeding standards are to improve the race and to increase the economy value.
 Conformation
 HEAD: A strong head with large soft brown eyes and without an untamed look. A strong slightly curved nose, wide nostrils, strong well-formed mouth with will-fitted jaws. Up to two tooth must show a 100% fit. Four tooth olds and older may show 6 mm protrusion. Permanent teeth must cut in the correct anatomical place. The forehead must be prominently curved linking up with the curve of the nose and horns. Horns should be strong, of moderate length and placed moderately apart with a gradual backward curve. Horns have to be as round and solid as possible and coloured darkly. Ears are to be broad, smooth and of medium length hanging downwards from the head. Too short ears are undesirable.

Characteristic cull defects: Concave forehead, horns too straight or too flat, pointed jaw, ears folded (lengthwise), stiff protruding ears, too short ears, too long lower jaws, short bottom jaw and blue eyes.
 
 NECK AND FOREQUARTERS: A neck of moderate length in proportion to the length of the body, full and well fleshed and well-joined with the forequarter is essential. The breastbone should be broad with a deep and broad brisket. The shoulder should be fleshy, in proportion to the body and be well-fitted to the withers. The withers should be as broad and as well-filled as possible (not sharp). The front legs should be of medium length and in proportion to the depth of the body. The legs should be strong and well placed, with strong pastern joints and well-formed hoofs which are as dark as possible.

Characteristic cull defects: Too long, thin neck, too short neck, shoulders too loose.
 
 BARREL: The ideal is a long, deep broad barrel. The ribs must be well sprung and fleshed, and the loins as well fitted as possible. The goat should have a broad, fairly straight back and must not be pinched behind the shoulders.

Characteristic cull defects: Back too concave, too slab sided, too cylindrical or pinched behind the shoulder.
 
 HINDQUARTERS: The Boer Goat should have a broad and long rump, not sloping too much, well fleshed buttocks which are not too flat, and have fully fleshed thighs. The tail must be straight where it grows out of the dock and then swing to either side.

Characteristic cull defects: A rump that hangs too much or is too short. A too long shank or flat buttocks.
 
 LEGS: Emphasis should be placed on the legs which should be strong (of good texture) and well placed. Too fleshy legs are undesirable. Strong legs imply hardiness and a strong constitution, which are absolutely essential characteristics of the Boer Goat.

Characteristic cull defects: Knock knees, bandy legs, "koeisekel of regophak." Legs too thin or too fleshy. Weak pasterns and hoofs pointing outwards or inwards.
 
 SKIN AND COVERINGS: A loose supple skin with sufficient chest and neck folds, especially in the case of rams, is essential. Eyelids and hairless parts must be pigmented. The hairless skin under the tail should have 75% pigmentation for stud purposes with 100% pigmentation the ideal. Short, glossy hair is desireable. A limited amount of fur will be tolerated during winter months.

Characteristic cull defects: Covering too long and coarse or too furry.
 
 SEXUAL ORGANS: Ewes: Well-formed udder firmly attached with no more than two functional teats on a side. Permissible defects: a) If there is no indication that the teat is separating, but there are two milk openings, this is acceptable. b) Double teats: the front 50% should be split. Rams: Two reasonably large, well formed, healthy and equal sized testes in one scrotum. A scrotum with no larger spit than 5 cm is permissible. The scrotum must be at least 25 cm in circumference.

Characteristic cull defects: Bunched, calabash or double teats. Too small testes; a scrotum with more than a 5 cm split.
 
 QUALITY: This is achieved with short glossy hair and a fine lustre.
 SIZE: The ideal is an average sized, heavy goat with maximum meat production. A desireable relationship between length of leg and depth of body should be achieved at all ages. Lambs should tend to be longer in the leg.

Characteristic cull defects: Goats too large or too small (pony).
 
 COLOURING: The ideal is a white goat with a red head and ears, and fully pigmented. The blaze must be evident. Shadings between light red and dark red are permissible. The minimum requirement for a stud animal is a patch of at least 10 cm in diameter on both sides of the head, ears excluded. Both ears should have at least 75% red colouring and the same percentage pigmentation.

The following is permissible for stud purposes:

HEAD, NECK AND FORE-QUARTERS: A total red colouring is permissible not further than the shoulder blade and on the shoulder it must exist not lower than level with the chest junction.

BARREL, HINDQUARTER AND BELLY: Only one patch not exceeding 10 cm in diameter is permissible.

LEGS: The term "legs" is taken to mean that portion below an imaginary line formed by the chest and the underline. Patches with maximum of 5 cm in diameter are permissible.

TAIL: The tail must be red, but the red colour may not continue onto the body for more than 2.5 cm.

RED HAIR AND COVERING: Very few red hairs are permissible at the 2-tooth stage.

PIGMENTATION: Discriminate against too light pigmentation.

FLOCK GOAT: A flock goat is a Boer goat which does not comply with the stud standards, but has no cull faults. At least 50% of the colour must be white; the other 50% must be red. Under the tail the flock goat must be at least 25% pigmented Rams may not be more than 25% red.
 
 EXPLANATION OF BREED STANDARDS: In applying standards, there are many aspects which cannot be fully defined. In such cases the inspector or judge must use his discretion. In spite of the breed standards being clear and to the point, it is nevertheless necessary to supply additional information in respect of certain descriptions. The major part of the body of the goat must be white to make it conspicuous and to facilitate the rounding up of goats in dense terrain. A pigmented skin on the hairless parts, e.g. under the tail, round the eyelids and mouth, etc., is absolutely essential, because it offers resistance to sunburn which may result in cancer. A pigmented skin is also more resistant to skin disease. A loose, supple skin is essential for adaptability to climatic conditions. In South Africa, which is a warm and sunny country, an animal with a loose skin and short hair is better adapted. In addition a skin of this kind provides additional resistance to external parasites.
 GENERAL APPEARANCE AND TYPE: In appearance it is a goat with a fine head, round horns bent backwards, a loose, supple and pleated skin (especially in rams) with different body parts well fleshed and in perfect balance. The ewe must be feminine, wedging slightly to the front, which is a sign of fertility. The ram, nevertheless, appears heavier in the head, neck and forequarters. The upgraded boer goat is an animal with symmetry, with a strong, vigorous appearance and enough quality. In the ewe there is strong emphasis on femininity; in the ram one of masculinity.
 FERTILITY: a) Shows: An ewe must have lambed at 6 tooth age already or must visibly be with young or she will be culled. b) Auctions: 6 tooth or older ewes must visibly be with young or be certified in writing as pregnant by a veterinary surgeon or the ewe will be culled. Certificate to be handed in during inspection.
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jopar345
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« Reply #37 on: June 13, 2008, 09:46:12 PM »

sir i am jopar from tarlac. i have started goat raising a few years back on a 3 hectare land. all i have are native goats. i have around 40 doe breeders (inahin). i am now in the stage to upgrade my goats. what is the best breed to cross my native herd?
i have recently acquired a 16 month old boer buck. almost purebreed.
i also have 3 saanen bucks about 10 months.
and a anglo nubian buck around 3 years old.
all these "imported" goats were adopted to me by priest friend who was recently stationed to iloilo. he cannot bring his goats to him in his new place.
i am also interested to purchase a kalahari red. where can i buy one and for how much?
can you pls give me the specs or preferebly give pics on goat cages. i will soon build cages for my goats.
thank u very much
JOPAR
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nemo
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« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2008, 08:41:32 AM »

check your mail.

You could also pm Mikey about goats.
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mikey
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« Reply #39 on: June 15, 2008, 11:31:38 AM »

Hi,good for you,you are lucky to have a good selection of breeding bucks to choose from.You have one meat breed and 4 dairy breeds.Your herd of does is 40,well you must decide which goats to breed to the bucks for upgrading your herd. The idea is to improve ones  herd when crossbreeding.Remember,one must be careful when breeding boers to natives.Myself,I would only choose does that are the biggest and have kidded before.The remaining does would be divided up and bred to the dairy bucks.We personally breed a bor/an to our native does,our boers are breed to boers or f2s.Our anglos are bred to anglos and natives.

The Kalahari Red,I doubt very much if this breed is in the Philippines.There are people in the Philippines calling the RED BOER or also called a ROAN Kalahari Reds but this is not true.The boer is a breed specific,the kalahari breed is its own breed specific.Science has proven this to be the case.The Kalahari Reds are found in Australia and South Africa.No one has imported the Kalahari Red as far as I know of.We,would love to have kalahari reds on our farm,but we are unable to find any in the Visayas,just red boers being called kalahari reds.Another goat we have looked at is the Kiko,believe there are limited numbers in the north of the country,in your general area.These would be expensive goats to buy when first imported,due to low breeding numbers and usually higher demand.The one that could import some breeding stock from Australia,would be sitting in a good position.
Good Luck with your farming venture:
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jopar345
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« Reply #40 on: June 17, 2008, 07:53:38 AM »

sir mikey thank you very much for the info. i have started to cross my anglo with my big native does. i hope the kids would be of superior quality.
since my boer has been with me for about 8 months now i was able to cross him with some of my natives. i already have produced 1 male from this cross.
i was able to see the red boer just this weekend. yes you are correct. they said it was a red kalahari but it was was not.
thanks for everything.
jopar
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mikey
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« Reply #41 on: June 18, 2008, 03:18:51 AM »

jopar345
You are welcome,good luck with your breeding program.In a few years you will see a big change in your goat herd,better stock equals better prices.Some day there will be some Kalahari Reds in the Philippines or AI will be advanced enough to allow for a better selection of breed sires.
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spokolongkong
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« Reply #42 on: July 24, 2008, 12:18:45 PM »

hello po,, hingi lng po ng advice.. bgo lng po kc ako ok lng po b n mg start ako s mga native goats?
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« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2008, 05:50:24 PM »

Sir,

Kasi may mga alaga akong baka sa koral at doon din nakalagay o gumagala yong alaga kong mga kambing lumalayo naman sila sa mga baka dahil minsan hinahabol sila. Okey lang po ba iyon parihas regular naman ang deworming?
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nemo
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« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2008, 07:52:13 PM »

Better to make separate housing for your cattle and goat.

they will be prone to injury if they are mixed together like that
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No pork for one week makes a man weak!!!
Baboy= Barako, inahin, fattener, kulig
Pig feeds=Breeder/gestating, lactating, booster, prestarter, starter, grower, finisher.
Swine Manual Raffle
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