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Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #60 on: June 29, 2014, 12:19:44 PM »

Poultry Prices Taking off as Macroeconomic Conditions Improve
27 June 2014
Rabobank

GLOBAL - Global poultry prices are taking off in the second quarter of the year, according to Rabobank's Poultry Quarterly Q2: Prices Taking Off report.

This bullishness is driven by relative price support from high beef and pork prices alongside demand recovery and a more balanced supply and demand situation in most regions of the world.

This is expected to lead to an improvement in profitability for the global poultry industry.

"Under improved global market conditions, led by the North American region, a slight increase in global chicken prices is expected," said Rabobank Analyst Nan-Dirk Mulder.

"We see an increasingly balanced market, where supply discipline is more the order of the day and improving margins will be the likely result.

“However, markets remain volatile and any change in fundamentals, especially from the supply and feed side, will impact global prices. Suppliers should look to keep production growth disciplined.”

Global feed prices are expected to decline in the third and fourth quarter based on current fundamentals and a good crop outlook for wheat and soybeans.

Despite this positive outlook, the possible return of volatility in feed prices remains a threat to the poultry industries in all regions as stock levels remain low.

Global grains and oilseeds prices have recently increased and old crop grain markets are currently tighter than expected. In addition, ongoing concerns about the situation in Ukraine and the potential threat of an El Niño event are creating some market volatility.

Animal disease outbreaks also remain a concern.

Regional Updates
•United States: 2014 is on pace to be even better than 2013 - one of the most profitable years in the last decade. The industry is primed to benefit from lower beef and pork production, a limited breeder flock, increasing exports due to the risk of another avian influenza (AI) outbreak in Mexico, and favourable feed costs.
•European Union: Margins in the EU poultry industry are currently quite strong. Markets are reasonably well balanced, with a reduction in production in the first quarter compared to the same period in 2014 and relatively strong demand.
•China: AI outbreaks decreased, coinciding with warmer weather in the second quarter of 2014. The negative impact on consumption is fading and the market is now showing signs of recovery, with increasing poultry prices in both retail and live bird prices.
•Brazil: Poultry meat prices are expected to hold firm in the second quarter of the year as a consequence of the high prices of competing proteins as well as the increases in both domestic and international demand.
•Other EMEA: The Russian poultry industry is still suffering from oversupply in the domestic market. Market conditions in the South African poultry industry have normalised after a long period of oversupply with rising imports.
•Other South America: Production in Mexico has been unable to recover from its 2013 contraction and could experience further setbacks as a result of the return of AI. Domestic issues saw production in Argentina fall four per cent year-on-year in the first quarter of 2014.
•Other Asia: The Japanese and Thai poultry industries remains bullish although the gradual restart of a major Thai broiler producer might impact future outlook. In contrast, India's poultry industry experienced one of the worst first quarters in the last five years.

 


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #61 on: July 07, 2014, 10:30:47 AM »

Little Change in Global Poultry Meat Price
04 July 2014


GLOBAL - The FAO Meat Price has risen in the last month on increasing pork prices but the chicken price is little changes. FAO's overall Food Price Index has fallen for a third consecutive month, mainly on lower cereal and vegetable oil prices.

The FAO Food Price Index averaged 206.0 points in June 2014, down 3.8 points (1.8 per cent) from May and nearly six points (2.8 per cent), below June 2013. Last month’s decline, which was the third in succession, was largely the result of a marked drop in cereal and vegetable oil prices, following further improvements in global production prospects. Although sugar and dairy quotations also edged lower, the falls were far less pronounced. On the other hand, meat prices held steady.

FAO

The FAO Cereal Price Index averaged 196.2 points in June, down 10.9 points (5.2 per cent) from a revised value in May and 36.2 points (15.6 per cent) below last year. The slide was mainly caused by a weakening of wheat and maize quotations, both of which fell by close to seven per cent, a reflection of a further improvement in world crop prospects and diminishing concerns over disruption of shipments from Ukraine. By contrast, rice prices were marginally up from May, mostly reflecting the suspension of large public stock sales in Thailand.

The FAO Vegetable Oil Price Index averaged 188.9 points in June, down 6.4 points (3.3 per cent) from May and 4.6 points (2.4 per cent) below June 2013. Quotations for palm oil, the most widely traded edible oil, fell to a nine-month low last month, as seasonally high output coincided with subdued global import demand. Similarly, soy oil prices dropped to a four-year trough on abundant availabilities in South America and anticipation of a record world soybean production in 2014/15. Prospects of ample sunflower and rapeseed oil supplies in 2014/15 also weighed on the index.

The FAO Dairy Price Index averaged 236.5 points in June, down 2.5 points (1.0 per cent) over May and 9.7 points (4.0 per cent) less year-on-year. The decline in June was substantially less than in the previous three months, suggesting that the downward price adjustment may be coming to an end. At the product level, large supply of milk powders continued to weigh on the market, while a firm import demand has kept cheese prices on the rise.

The FAO Meat Price Index averaged 194.2 points in June, 1.4 points (0.7 per cent) more than in May and 14.6 points (8.1 per cent) above last year. The June increase of the index was principally due to a continuing strengthening of pig meat prices, as world supplies were constrained in recent months by an outbreak of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea (PED) virus in the United States. Bovine and ovine meat quotations also moved seasonally higher, while prices for poultry meat were little changed.

The FAO Sugar Price Index averaged 258 points in June, down 1.2 point (0.5 per cent), from May but still 15.4 points (6.4 per cent) up from last year. Despite this month’s marginal decline, the market remains concerned about the possible effects of a recurring El Niño weather anomaly that could exacerbate the anticipated fall of global output. Already, indications of below average monsoon rains are pointing to a possible production shortfall in India, the second largest world sugar producer after Brazil and top world sugar consumer.

Note: *The small revision since 2013 reflects slight changes to the IGC wheat index, which is used for the calculation of FAO cereal index.

FAO

Original source: FAO report -


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #62 on: July 21, 2014, 12:35:47 AM »

New Commercial and Technical Manager for Indian River
18 July 2014

Aviagen


PHILIPPINES - Esmi San Pedro graduated with a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Central Luzon State University in 1987 before entering the pig industry as he started his career in agriculture.



Esmi San Pedro

He subsequently moved to Calauit Wild Life Sanctuary for two years before accepting a job in the Philippine Animal Health Center where he worked for two more years before he entered the poultry industry with RFM/Swift Foods.

After a year, Mr San Pedro was employed by San Miguel Foods as a manager in their breeding operation while the company expanded to become a leading entity in the Philippine market. Mr San Pedro worked for over 11 years from the mid nineties for San Miguel before accepting an offer to join Sierad Produce in Indonesia as the general manager responsible for the breeding and hatchery operation.

In 2009 Mr San Pedro became Technical Service Manager for Indian River in the Aviagen organization, responsible for Philippines, Malaysia, Korea, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, India and China. He has worked in this role for the past five years before being promoted to Commercial and Technical Manager of Indian River for Middle East and Asia.

"We are pleased to announce this new position for Mr San Pedro and look forward to his contribution to the business in the future," commented Fred Kao, Business Manager Indian River.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2014, 11:46:20 PM »

Extending Storage Time of Eggs Increases Salmonella Risk
01 August 2014


EU - Extending the storage time of eggs at home or at retail would increase Salmonella food poisoning risks, says EFSA’s latest scientific opinion on public health risks from eggs.

Experts focussed on the risk to consumers posed by Salmonella Enteritidis, the bacteria responsible for causing the highest number of egg-borne outbreaks in EU.

EFSA’s experts looked at the consequences of extending the sell-by date and best-before date for eggs eaten on their own or as ingredients in foods. The sell-by date is the last date shops are supposed to display eggs for sale; the best-before date is the period in which the eggs maintain their best quality, for example their texture and flavour.

If the sell-by date for household consumption is extended from 21 to 28 days for eggs, the risk of infections increases by 40 per cent for uncooked and 50 per cent for slightly cooked eggs respectively.

In the worst case scenario, where the sell-by date is 42 days and the best-before date is 70 days, the risk is around three times higher than currently for both uncooked and slightly cooked eggs.

The results are similar for eggs used in catering establishments, which are usually collected directly from wholesalers, by-passing retail.

To calculate such estimates, EFSA experts used a quantitative model that allowed comparing the current situation regarding the storage of eggs in the EU with different possible scenarios, using different sell-by dates and best-before dates.

“If Salmonella is present inside eggs, it can multiply more rapidly as the temperature and storage time rise. However, thoroughly cooking eggs reduces the risk of infection”, explains Mr John Griffin, Chair of the Biological Hazards Panel.

Keeping eggs refrigerated is the only way to reduce the increased risk of infections due to extended storage. However, if the sell-by date and best-before date were extended for more than three weeks, the risk increases- even with refrigeration in shops.

This scientific advice was requested

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #64 on: August 10, 2014, 05:52:22 AM »

Weekly Overview: Political Situation in Ukraine Impacts Global Poultry Trade
07 August 2014


GLOBAL - The tense political situation in Ukraine has now led to Russia banning imports of food products, including poultry, from a number of countries, a move that seems likely to impact the Russian people at least as much as its trading partners. Food should not be used as a political bargaining tool, writes Jackie Linden. Also in the news in the last week was an update on the new poultry inspection system in the US and a survey of foodborne pathogens on UK chicken.

Russia's president Vladimir Putin has announced a ban on imports of agricultural and food products from countries including the US, EU, Canada, Australia and Norway in reaction to sanctions imposed against it by these countries.

The Russian government has today approved a list of food products which are included in the ban, which is effective immediately.

Imports of beef, pork, poultry, fish, cheese, milk, fruits and vegetables from the US, EU, Canada, Australia and Norway will therefore be banned for a year from today, said Russia's Prime Minister, Dmitry Medvedev.

US poultry organisations, the National Chicken Council and USA Poultry & Egg Export Council commented that they do not expect that a Russian ban on US poultry imports will have a great impact on the industry.

Commenting on the ban, the President of the American Farm Bureau Federation said: “This is clearly a political move. It is unfortunate that the biggest losers in this will be Russian consumers, who will pay more for their food now as well as in the long run.

A spokesperson for the White House commented: "Retaliating against Western companies or countries will deepen Russia's international isolation, causing further damage to its own economy."

Russia has also being talking with some South American countries to increase exports. Brazil and Argentina have both approached Russia with the view to meeting the demand for poultry meat, it is reported.

In the United States in the last week, the Food Safety and Inspection Service has announced a critical step forward in making chicken and turkey products safer for Americans to eat.

Poultry companies will have to meet new requirements to control Salmonella and Campylobacter, and up to 5,000 foodborne illnesses will be prevented each year as a result of the New Poultry Inspection System, an updated science-based inspection system that positions food safety inspectors throughout poultry facilities in a smarter way.

Also on food safety, a new survey of Campylobacter on fresh shop-bought chickens in the UK reveals that 59 per cent of birds tested positive for the presence of Campylobacter. In four per cent of samples, Campylobacter was identified on the outside of the packaging.

And finally, on bird flu news, the Taiwanese veterinary authorities have carried out intensified surveillance for three months after the H5N2 outbreak was detected and there have been no signs of the virus.



Jackie Linden - Senior Editor



Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #65 on: August 24, 2014, 09:32:33 AM »

Brazilian Broiler Production Forecast to Increase in 2015
21 August 2014
USDA Foreign Agricultural Service

BRAZIL - Post forecasts broiler production to increase by five per cent in 2015.

This increase will likely be driven by higher exports stimulated by the depreciation of the Brazilian currency, lower feed costs due to forecast record soybean and corn crops estimated for 2014/15 crop year, and higher world demand for the Brazilian product, especially from the Russian Federation.

Post sources also identify the high level of consumer debt in Brazil as a constraint to increased domestic demand. The outlook for turkey production and exports is for moderate growth next year.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #66 on: September 01, 2014, 12:53:31 AM »

Effects of Grinding Method, Particle Size and Physical Form of Diet on Digestion in Laying Hens
26 August 2014


Poultry Science journal


New research from Germany reveals that feeding a coarsely ground or mash diet stimulates the development of the gut organs, and that mash feeding increases glucose transport capacity through changes in the intestinal microstructure.

Several studies illustrated that the structure of feed, i.e., the particle size, particle-size distribution, and the physical form of the diet, affects the avian gastrointestinal function and health leading to changes in productive performance.

In the current issue of Poultry Science, Ilen Röhe of the Free University in Berlin and co-authors there and at the International Research Association of Feed Technology in Braunschweig report that investigations concerning the effects of feeding differently processed diets on laying hens are limited and primarily concentrated on bird performance.

Their study examines the effect of feed processing on the gastrointestinal morphology and on the jejunal glucose transport of laying hens.

In eight replicates, a total of 384 hens (Lohmann Brown) aged 20 weeks were randomly allocated to eight different groups and fed over a period of 21 days in a three-factorial design.

Diets differed in
•grinding method, either hammer or roller mill
•physical form, either mash or expandate, and
•particle size, either coarsely or finely ground.

During the experimental trial, the laying performance of each feeding group was recorded daily and the feed intake and bodyweight determined weekly.

After slaughtering, the weights of the pancreas, proventriculus, gizzard and small intestine were measured. Villus lengths and crypt depths of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were determined.

The jejunal electrogenic glucose transport was studied in Ussing chambers.

Hens that received mash instead of expandate had a heavier proventriculus (P=0.011), gizzard (P<0.001) and pancreas (P=0.019), whereas the feeding of coarsely instead of finely ground diets led to higher gizzard weights (P<0.001).

Mash-fed hens showed longer duodenal (P<0.001) and shorter ileal villi (P=0.047) and increased duodenal villus height-to-crypt depth ratios (P<0.001) than those given the expandate.

Mash-fed hens had higher glucose transport rates than expandate-fed hens (P<0.001).

The feeding of coarsely ground and mash diets stimulated the development of the gastrointestinal organs, concluded Röhe and co-authors.

They added that mash feeding influenced the intestinal microstru

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #67 on: October 06, 2014, 08:57:41 AM »
Poultry News     Indian Poultry Industry on a Growth Path
01 October 2014Indbro - Research and Breeding Farms Private Limited

INDIA - The outlook for the growth of the Indian broiler and egg sectors should be good for at least another year, writes Dr Kotaiah of Indbro Research and Breeding Farms Private Limited.

Indian broiler production at 3.8 million tons is the fourth largest in the world after US, Brazil and China. The growth is continuing at 12 to 15 per cent. Contact farming with small farmers spread all over the place is a healthy growth involving millions of small landowners.

The broiler growing companies are becoming bigger and the feed mills are getting larger. More than 60 per cent of the feed is being processed unlike in the past. The marketing continues to be “live birds” with no signs of improvement towards processed chicken. Processed food vendors like KFC, Mcdonald, Godrej, C.P., Venkeys and Amrit are growing but slowly.

The layer farming with 220 million layers is growing at six to eight per cent and the egg prices are record high at this part of the year compared to any previous years at the same time.

The egg promotion agencies are doing a good job in promoting eggs in schools, hospitals etc. besides growing household consumption.

The news of good soybean and maize crops in the US is good for India because most of the global buyers will turn to US and India's small surplus stocks will be safe for local consumption.

The price line also will be low in the trading in accordance with the international market. The purchases for 15 October 2014 are already trading 20 per cent lower than what they were in the beginning of September.

The new corn crop due to come in October 2014 is not that bright this year in yield due to late monsoon but the plantation area had grown because of higher corn prices realized by the grower last year. As a result, corn prices on the stocks available are also looking downward.

Individual poultry producers are growing big and the concerns on health of chickens and humans are well addressed. The food handling and processing regulations, which are being grounded fast, should take the industry fast in to the growth.

With soybean and corn favourably priced and consumption going up steadily, the outlook for the growth of the Indian poultry industry should be good for at least another year.


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2014, 05:09:19 AM »
GLOBAL - On World Egg Day (10 October) countries around the globe celebrate the egg, one of nature’s superfoods.

So get cracking this Friday with delicious egg meals from around the world by trying some of these international egg recipes on eggrecipes.co.uk including Eggy Mexican quesadillas, Vegetable biryani or Spanish baked eggs.

Or why not break a world record as well as an egg - like Mohamad Shahabaz Khan who achieved the most flips of an omelette with 103 flips in a minute!

Egg lovers can also celebrate a clutch of good news stories. The latest research shows eggs contain even more nutrients than 30 years ago, including 70 per cent more vitamin D than when they were last measured; the previous limits on egg consumption, due to their cholesterol content, have been lifted; and eggs have been shown to keep you feeling fuller for longer, making them a natural aid for dieters.

Make sure you select the best of British eggs for recipes from any part of the world – look for the British Lion mark, which guarantees that eggs have been produced to the highest standards of food safety.


 

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