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Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #30 on: October 02, 2013, 02:32:27 AM »

Weekly Overview: EU Poultry Industry Discovers Where the Paella Features Chicken
26 September 2013


GLOBAL - The Spanish city of Valencia hosted the annual meeting of the European poultry producers and exporters association last week, providing food for thought on a variety of topics. There has been political agreement on the EU's Common Agricultural Policy, which represents a significant step towards it becoming a reality. Nepal's poultry industry, meanwhile, is struggling with multiple outbreaks of H5N1 bird flu.

The 56th General Assembly of the Association of Poultry Processors and Poultry Trade in the EU (AVEC) was held in the splendid city of Valencia last week - an appropriate location as the local version of one of Spain's iconic national dishes, paella, features chicken instead of the more usual seafood [pictured].

With nearly 130 participants representing 14 countries and a fine and varied programme of presentations, AVEC's annual General Assembly was hailed as a great success for the organising hosts.

The theme of the meeting, explained Federico Félix, was 'Continuing the success of poultry learning from research and practice'. Mr Félix is the President of ProPollo, the poultry meat association of Spain and also the current President of AVEC.

Also in the EU, Europe’s farmers now know where they stand on payment changes, following the completion of the political negotiations on the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy. This is a significant milestone in the modernisation of policy for agriculture for the 21st century, aiming to shift the focus from support for agribusiness conglomerates towards greater sustainability and the rural economy.

Looking further afield, China has announced its decision not to appeal against the decision of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

The announcement on 25 September by the US Trade Representative that the WTO has formally adopted the recent dispute settlement panel’s report in China’s anti-dumping and countervailing duty cases against imports of US chicken products cam as welcome to the US poultry industry.

Finally, turning to Bird Flu News, Nepal continues to grapple with the H5N1 virus in its poultry flocks; 43 separate outbreaks affecting almost 350,000 birds were officially reported in a two-week period around the beginning of August. Two young Cambodians have been infected with the H5N1 virus, one of whom has died. And in China, an official warning has been made that the avian H7N9 flu strain is highly likely to return and affect humans in the coming months.



Jackie Linden - Senior Editor




Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #31 on: October 06, 2013, 12:00:47 AM »

Brazilian Poultry Exports Down in September
04 October 2013


BRAZIL - Brazilian chicken exports reached 302,700 tonnes in September, down one per cent compared to the same month last year, according to the Brazilian Poultry Union (Ubabef).

Revenues stood at US$582.3 million, down 7.9 per cent compared to the same period last year.

A total of 2.865 million tons of chicken meat was shipped during January to September, which again marks a fall of two per cent compared to the same period in 2012.

However, revenues rose 6.7 per cent to US$ 5.993 billion.

Ricardo Santin, Markets director at Ubabef, said: "We were expecting to see results similar to those of August. However, climate issues in South Brazil slowed down shipments in the last ten days of the month. We believe there will be a rebound in November."


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2013, 09:13:14 AM »

Australia: Agricultural Commodities: Chicken Meat
07 October 2013


A review of the state of the industry by Clay Mifsud, based on research by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) for the September Quarter 2013.

Australian chicken meat production is forecast to increase by two per cent in 2013–14 to almost 1.1 million tonnes in response to higher prices driven by strong consumer demand. Despite forecast increased chicken meat prices, their relativity to considerably higher beef, sheep meat and pig meat prices is expected to continue to support growth in consumer demand.

In 2012–13, Australian chicken meat production increased by two per cent to 1.05 million tonnes. Higher production over the past year reflects a two per cent increase in the number of birds slaughtered to 563 million head, as the meat yield per bird remained steady at an average of 1.9kg.

Domestic consumption of chicken meat is forecast to be around 44kg per person in 2013–14, one per cent more than in 2012–13. Disparity in retail prices between chicken and other meats has contributed to Australian per-person chicken meat consumption increasing by 80 per cent over 20 years to 2012–13, to be among the highest in the OECD.

The chicken meat industry in Australia is highly vertically integrated; two privately owned companies supply around 70 per cent of meat chickens for slaughter. Five privately owned medium-sized processors and a number of smaller processors supply the remaining 30 per cent. About 80 per cent of all meat chickens are produced under contract -processors supply day-old chicks and rearing specifications -and the remaining 20 per cent are grown on company farms.

About 96 per cent of Australian chicken meat production is consumed domestically and the remainder is exported. In 2012–13 Australian chicken meat exports fell 13 per cent to 29,000 tonnes (shipped weight) reflecting temporary bans placed on imports of Australian poultry after avian influenza (H7N7) was detected in New South Wales. In 2013–14, Australian chicken meat exports are forecast to resume growing and are expected to reach 34,000 tonnes.




Australian chicken meat exports

Chicken Meat Imports in Australia

The Australian chicken meat industry is not under significant competition from imports. Imports of cooked chicken meat have been permitted in Australia since 1998 and fresh since 2008 but import volumes remain low relative to domestic production.

Imports of deboned cooked chicken meat were negligible until the late 2000s, with more than 80 per cent of imports sourced from New Zealand and Thailand. In 2012–13, imports of cooked chicken meat increased by 25 per cent to 7,000 tonnes, with a value of A$50 million. However, this represents around one per cent of Australian chicken meat consumption.

Imported cooked chicken meat must comply with the Imported Food Control Act 1992 and the Australian Food Standards Code under the National Food Authority Act 1991.

Under this legislation, the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry may inspect, sample, hold and test imported cooked chicken meat for microbial agents or residues of public health concern. The chickens from which the cooked chicken meat is produced must originate from the country of export. The meat must be cooked at high temperature for at least 125 minutes to ensure eradication of pests or bacteria. Chicken meat for export to Australia must be processed and stored separately from all other meat processed in the same facility.




Australian cooked chicken meat imports

In 2008, Australia’s Director of Animal and Plant Quarantine made a policy determination establishing quarantine requirements for importation of fresh chicken meat, based on a generic import risk analysis report. The import risk analysis recommended that imports of chicken meat be permitted subject to quarantine conditions for nine disease agents of quarantine concern, including notifiable avian influenza, Newcastle disease and infectious bursal disease. At July 2013, less than 300 tonnes of fresh chicken meat had been imported.


Chicken meat outlook

October 2013

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2013, 04:16:10 AM »

Yorkshire Leads Way in Putting Goose on Autumn Menus
18 October 2013


UK - Yorkshire goose producer Stuart Mathison and country hotel Beverley Tickton Grange showed this week how to expand the market for goose by getting more chefs to put it on the autumn menu.



Stuart Mathison speaking to visitors at Southfield Farm, Leven, watched by John Franklin
, chairman of British Goose Producers



David Nowell preparing the roulade of goose breast at Beverley Tickton Grange Hotel

The Mathison family, who hosted the British Goose Producers’ annual farm walk at Leven, near Beverley, produce 1500 geese a year with one third going into the catering market during the autumn ahead of the main demand at Christmas.

And at one of their customers, the nearby Tickton Grange Hotel, well known local chef David Nowell spoke about the new approaches to cooking and serving goose that would appeal to restaurants and caterers — and then served BGP members luncheon based on goose.

“Goose is a fantastic product and the challenge for the restaurant is to make it affordable,” said Mr Nowell, food and beverage executive of Tickton Grange, who played a prominent role in the Beverley Food Festival earlier this month.

He said that cooking goose in a water bath avoided the shrinkage that happened with roasting and with new, more adventurous recipes a goose would typically serve 12 rather than six diners and so achieve a margin that would be attractive to more chefs.

He then served a buffet lunch featuring two such dishes — a roulade of Mathisons’ goose breast with a mousseline of goose liver, thyme, hazelnut and cranberries and a confit made from goose legs with port reduction and allspice, fried in sage crumb.

John Franklin, BGP chairman, said new recipes had been developed through working over the past year with the City College Norwich which has one of the top regional hotel schools. Students and lecturers at the college had developed a range of recipes using both meat and eggs from the goose, and he urged members to forge links with their local colleges to enthuse the chefs of tomorrow in seeing the potential of goose as a seasonal dish during the autumn.

On the Mathisons’ Southfield Farm at Leven members saw not only the geese grazing in the field but also the duck rearing enterprise which supplies local hotels, restaurants, butchers and caterers through the year.

Stuart and his brother Malcolm are currently buying 650 day-old ducklings every fortnight and they are seeking a Food Standards Agency licence to increase production next year. The duck sales have been expanded by introducing portion-controlled products and now goose livers, goose fat and smoked breasts are also sold under the ‘Yorkshire ducks and geese’ brand.

The farm also has an extensive grain storage business which makes locally grown wheat available on site for feeding the poultry.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2013, 09:17:09 AM »

Chickens to Benefit from Biofuels Breakthrough
01 November 2013


UK - Chickens could be the unexpected beneficiaries of the growing biofuels industry, feeding on proteins retrieved from the fermenters used to brew bioethanol, thanks to research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

It has long been known that the yeasty broth left over after bioethanol production is nutritious, but it has taken a collaboration between Nottingham Trent University and AB Agri, the agricultural division of Associated British Foods, to prove that Yeast Protein Concentrate (YPC) can be separated from the fibrous cereal matter.

The researchers have also shown that YPC may be a cost-competitive substitute for imported soya-based and similar high-value protein feeds currently used in the diets of chickens bred for meat production.

The project was born out of the vision of biofuels pioneer Dr Pete Williams of AB Agri, who was convinced valuable material was being overlooked when cereals were fermented to make bioethanol.

With Dr Emily Burton of Nottingham Trent University, he was able to secure funding from the EPSRC for a CASE studentship that allowed them to develop and analyse the process.

To establish the nutritional value of the concentrate, EPSRC CASE student Dawn Scholey examined the composition of the newly isolated, patented YPC in a series of experiments, which showed that it can be readily digested by chickens. A paper outlining this research is published in this month’s issue of the journal ‘Food and Energy Security’.

Project supervisor, Dr Burton says the work is only just beginning: “Bioethanol is already a 60-billion-litre per year global market but this project shows the fuel itself is only half the story – immense value lies within other co-product streams too. As well as the proteins, the yeast content provides important vitamins and other micronutrients.”

Produced by distilling and fermenting wheat and other agricultural feedstocks, bioethanol has particular potential for use as a petrol substitute. Currently, the dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS) generated as a co-product are sold to the cattle-feed market but this is not big enough to absorb all material that would be generated if bioethanol production ramps up significantly in future.

Dr Burton believes the project helps address an issue often raised in connection with cereal-based biofuels: “One concern with bioethanol is the perception it will compete with food crops for limited farmland. Our new work shows how the two can live side by side.”

The new, patented process separates DDGS into three fractions – fibre, a watery syrup and YPC, allowing global production of almost 3 million tonnes of supplementary high-quality protein per annum alongside current levels of bioethanol produced. A project at a US bioethanol facility is now up and running, demonstrating the performance of the process at factory scale.

Every year, 800 million chickens are reared for meat production in the UK and 48 billion worldwide. As well as helping to feed these birds, YPC could partially replace the fish meal used on commercial fish farms.

Dr Pete Williams of AB Agri, the industrial sponsor of the work, says: “We couldn’t have got this development started without the EPSRC CASE studentship that allowed us to establish the proof of concept, and to confirm the value-creation potential of our innovative separation process. By helping us to move to the next key stage of development, it has brought closer the prospect of full-scale industrial use that could deliver major benefits to the emerging ‘green’ fuel sector.”

CASE (Cooperation Awards in Science and Engineering) funding is provided by EPSRC for PhD students working with businesses on research projects of industrial relevance.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2013, 01:42:21 AM »

Report Says Egg Industry is More Sustainable Despite Expansion
07 November 2013


US - Egg production now boasts lower emissions and greater sustainability, says an Egg Industry Center study.

Researchers conducted a lifecycle analysis (LCA) of US egg production from 1960 to 2010 to evaluate environmental performance measures for the complete lifecycle from crops to hens to the farm gate.

Study findings indicate that the environmental efficiencies are the result of a wide range of factors, including the reduction of natural resource use, improved hen feed, better disease control and advancements in hen housing systems.

"The US egg industry has evolved remarkably over the past five decades by incorporating new technologies to protect natural resources," said Hongwei Xin, agricultural and biosystems engineering and animal science professor at Iowa State University, director of the Egg Industry Center and the study's lead researcher.

"Egg farmers have improved their production practices, allowing them to provide an affordable source of high-quality protein while using fewer resources and producing less waste."

Key results of the study found that compared to 1960:
•The egg production process releases significantly less polluting emissions, including 71 per cent lower greenhouse gas emissions.
•Hens now use 32 per cent less water per dozen eggs produced.
•Today's hens use a little over half the amount of feed to produce a dozen eggs.
•At the same time, today's hens produce 27 per cent more eggs per day and are living longer.

A Closer Look at the Findings

Due to increased feed efficiency, advancements in hen housing and manure management, egg farms now use less water and energy on a daily basis and release less polluting emissions. Every aspect of the egg production process, from cultivating feed to raising the laying hens, has led to a reduced environmental footprint.
•Feed efficiency plays a key role in reducing environmental impacts. Due to advancements in nutrition and bird breeding, young hens now require 48 per cent less food during the rearing period than they did in 1960 and the laying hens have 42 per cent better feed conversion. Using 1960 technology to produce the 2010 egg supply would have required 78 million more hens, 1.3 million more acres of corn and 1.8 million more acres of soybeans.
•Advancements in hen housing, such as improved building ventilation, temperature control, better lighting and a more secure housing environment, help to ensure that hens are protected from disease-carrying wildlife. These techniques have been widely adopted by egg farmers across the country, leading to healthier hens with lower mortality and higher rates of egg production. In addition, advancements in the development of preventative medicine to eliminate avian diseases have greatly improved hen health.
•Manure management has played a role in minimizing the egg industry's environmental footprint. The vast majority of manure from laying hens is recycled into crop production, providing nutrients for plants, contributing to healthy soils, saving energy and reducing commercial fertilizer use.

Looking Ahead

With the growing US population and egg demand on the rise, egg farmers play an important role in providing an abundant and affordable source of high-quality protein.

"The US population has increased by 72 per cent over the past 50 years, but efficiencies in egg production have enabled us to meet the demands of the growing population with just 18 per cent more hens, while also leaving a smaller environmental footprint," said Bob Krouse, an egg farmer for Midwest Poultry Services in Indiana. "Egg farmers are now in a position to help fulfill the growing need for an affordable and nutritious source of protein in an environmentally responsible manner."

Egg farmers are dedicated to providing safe, nutritious food while maintaining the highest quality care for their hens. At the same time, farmers understand the importance of protecting the land, water and air for their communities and future generations, and they are always looking to identify ways for continued improvement. Efforts to further improve feed efficiency, hen housing facilities and manure management will facilitate even greater environmental footprint reductions in the future.

The study was funded by the American Egg Board, the US Poultry and Egg Association, the United Egg Association -- Allied and the Egg Industry Center. To obtain data for 2010, researchers conducted anonymous surveys with egg farmers and collected data on 57.1 million young hens and 92.5 million laying hens

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #36 on: November 16, 2013, 01:11:17 AM »
GLOBAL POULTRY TRENDS 2013: Africa's Chicken Growth Exceeds World Average10 November 2013 Over the last decade, there has been a five per cent annual increase in chicken meat output from Africa countries, which has increased the continent's share of global production. In Oceania, the increase has been a little slower but further growth in output is forecast, according to industry analyst, Terry Evans.African Poultry Meat Growth Betters Global Average Between 2000 and 2011, chicken meat production in Africa expanded by almost five per cent per year as output climbed to 4.62 million tonnes. As global growth during this period averaged a little below four per cent per year, Africa increased her contribution to the world total from 4.7 to 5.1 per cent (Table 1). The individual country breakdown (Tables 2 and 3) reveals that all bar seven nations produced less than 100,000 tonnes a year in 2011. The seven biggest producers - with a combined output of 3.64 million tonnes - accounted for almost 80 per cent of the regional total. However, as is clear from Figure 1, between 2000 and 2011 significant growth occurred in only three of these – South Africa, Egypt and Morocco. The size ranking (Table 3) shows that South Africa dominates chicken meat production with an annual output of nearly 1.5 million tonnes accounting for almost one-third of the regional total in 2011. According to the South African Poultry Association (SAPA), the number of broilers slaughtered in 2010 was 969 million rising to 979 million in 2011 and further to 997 million in 2012. Based on day-old parent pullet placings and specific industry production standards, the latest estimate for 2013 of 1,054 million birds, points to an increase of almost six per cent on 2012. An average slaughter weight of around 1.4kg per bird would give a meat yield of close on 1.5 million tonnes. However, SAPA is in the process of re-addressing the industry standards which could alter output estimates. More important to the level of current production is the impact of imports on domestic production. South Africa’s receipts of relatively low-priced frozen chicken meat have grown from around 191,000 tonnes in 2008 to nearly 371,000 tonnes in 2012, when they represented around one-fifth of national broiler consumption. This increase could well have contributed to a number of small to medium-sized producers going out of business, while two of the country’s largest companies - Country Bird Holdings and RCC Foods (formerly Rainbow Chicken) - have recently reported a decline in yearly earnings of 17 per cent and 92 per cent, respectively. In an attempt to offset the impact of imports on earnings, Country Bird is diversifying its product range for the fast-food sector of the market. Chicken meat production in Egypt has suffered periodic set-backs since highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was first detected in 2006 and has since become endemic in several governorates. Despite this disease causing considerable economic loss to producers, output climbed dramatically by more than eight per cent per year between 2008 and 2011 when it came close to 800,000 tonnes (Table 2 and Figure 1). From 2000 to 2011, chicken meat production in Morocco expanded by some 8.5 per cent per year, with output coming close to 586,000 tonnes in 2011. However, higher input costs and lower market prices in the past few years have cut production. Returns improved earlier this year and there is optimism regarding the future and a recovery in production levels. Nigeria is the seventh largest country in the world with a human population currently of around 175 million expected to exceed 200 million by 2020. Between 2000 and 2010, chicken output rose by more than six per cent per year. According to the FAO data, the growth came to a halt in 2011 at 285,000 tonnes. Occasionally, if the data for the most recent year has not been confirmed, the FAO will insert the previous year’s figure in order to arrive at a regional total. However, the Poultry Association of Nigeria maintains that broiler production is much higher than this. While the industries in Algeria, Libya and Tunisia made some headway during the past decade or so, clearly as indicated in Figure 1, the growth has been much less dramatic than in the top three producers in the region. Figure 1. Leading chicken meat producers in Africa ('000 tonnes) Oceania: Australia’s Production Tops One Million Tonnes Chicken meat output in Oceania expanded by around 4.6 per cent per year between 2000 and 2011 to exceed 1.2 million tonnes and the indications are that expansion has since continued to around 1.3 million tonnes in 2013. As is clear from Table 4, the region’s total is almost entirely dependent upon the levels of production in Australia and to a much lesser extent, New Zealand, as these two provide almost 98 per cent of total output. In 2011, chicken meat production in Australia topped one million tonnes for the first time, its industry having grown by almost five per cent per year. The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) foresees growth continuing in the short- to medium-term. During 2013-14, a three per cent increase is anticipated to 1.08 million tonnes while by 2017-18, output is expected to rise to around 1.2 million tonnes. Chicken meat accounts for 95 per cent of total poultry meat in Australia. Just two major companies supply around three-quarters of national chicken output. The average eviscerated weight is around 1.9kg per bird compared with a global figure of just over 1.5kg. Production in New Zealand in 2011, at almost 160,000 tonnes, showed a near four per cent per year gain over the 2000 level (Table 4) although the increase when compared with 2006 was less than 9,000 tonnes. Between 2007 and 2010, output failed to reach 150,000 tonnes. The production data for the other countries in the region showed little movement during the review period with the exception of Fiji where output in 2011, at just 15,200 tonnes, was almost double the level in year 2000. November 2013

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #37 on: November 20, 2013, 09:25:54 AM »

Interaction Between Breeder Age and Hatching Time Affects Intestine Development and Broiler Performance
11 November 2013


Researchers in Turkey have explored the relationships between breeder age and hatching time and subsequent chick performance, concluding that that breeder age should be taken into consideration in the management of hatching eggs during incubation.

In a paper in Livestock Science, Mohamed Ibrahem El Sabry and colleagues at Ege University in Turkey report their investigation into the effects of breeder age and hatching time on hatching performance, morphological changes in jejunum and post-hatch performances until slaughter age.

A total of 544 eggs were obtained from two Ross broiler breeder flocks at 32 (young) and 49 (old) weeks of age. Eggs from each breeder age were placed in eight egg trays and incubated under standard incubation conditions.

Between 480 and 504 hours of incubation, eggs were checked individually to record hatched chicks.

According to hatching time, chicks were marked and divided into two groups as early hatched (EH, from 480 to 485 hours of incubation) and late hatched (LH, from 495 to 500 hours of incubation).

Sixteen chicks from each breeder age and hatching time were randomly selected at three hours after hatching, weighed and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Weights of residual yolk sac, heart, spleen and bursa of fabricius, lengths of digestive tract, jejunum, and villus height and width were obtained.

Hatching performance was determined. Chicks from each breeder age and hatching time were reared up to 35 days. Bodyweight and feed intake were recorded weekly, then feed conversion ratio was calculated.

The Izmir-based researchers found that hatching distribution of the chicks from the younger breeders was concentrated in the EH stage of the incubation.

Chick weight was significantly influenced by hatching time, where LH chicks registered heavier weight than chicks in the EH group.

Chicks from the younger breeders had shorter villi than the other groups when hatched at EH stage of the incubation.

From seven to 21 days of age, chicks from the older breeders hatched at LH were heavier than the other groups.

Feed intake by chicks from the older breeders was higher than from those of the breeders between one and 21 days of age, while feed conversion ratio was not influenced along the experimental period.

El Sabry and colleagues concluded that breeder age should be taken into consideration in the management of hatching eggs during incubation.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2013, 04:58:45 AM »
USDA International Egg and Poultry

Reports » USDA International Egg and Poultry » USDA International Egg and Poultry: Poultry Production in Turkey

28 November 2013
USDA International Egg and Poultry: Poultry Production in TurkeyUSDA International Egg and Poultry: Poultry Production in Turkey
Turkey’s poultry and egg industry continue to grow. Turkish chicken meat production (broilers and layers) totaled 1.7 million tons in 2012, up 7% from 2011.

USDA International Egg and Poultry

USDA Foreign Agricultural Service estimated broiler meat production at 1.76 million tons in 2013 and forecasts production to reach 1.82 million tons in 2014, an increase of 3%.

The number of broilers rose 6.4% in 2012 compared to the previous year; laying hen numbers increased 7.2%. Hen egg production rose 15% to reach 14.91 billion eggs in 2012, up from 12.95 million eggs a year earlier. Broilers and laying hens account for 98.5% of poultry production.



Turkey has not yet realized the export potential of its poultry industry; there are still big opportunities such as Saudi Arabia and the EU. Turkey has a logistical advantage and the ability to supply Halal-certified whole birds; as a result, exports have quadrupled over the past five years. In 2012, exports under HS 0207 totaled 304,347 tons, up 29% compared to a year earlier. The value rose about 37%, reaching $527 million in 2012. Turkey’s egg industry is also growing tremendously. Currently these companies export primarily to Iraq and are planning to export liquid egg to the EU in the near future.



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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #39 on: December 05, 2013, 11:26:51 AM »

Christmas Egg Shortage Expected after Bird Flu Outbreak
04 December 2013


AUSTRALIA - Australia is facing an egg shortage ahead of the peak holiday season after an outbreak of bird flu shut down two poultry farms.

WAtoday.com.au reports that about 450,000 chickens have been destroyed at a free range and caged egg farm in Young, NSW, creating a national shortfall, which will cause prices to rise and take six to 12 months to abate.

The virus is not the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, which has killed humans, nor is it closely related, the NSW Department of Primary Industries said.

But it has significantly dented supply and put pressure on prices.

Melbourne-based Farm Pride Foods, which is one of Australia’s biggest egg processors, has had to cancel orders, with its sales plunging between 8 and 9 per cent compared with the same time last year.

NSW Farmers Association Egg Committee chair Bede Burke said demand for eggs normally doubled in the week before Christmas "but this year the eggs won’t be there".

"The comfort level for eggs in NSW is about 1.4 million dozen to fill the cool rooms at the end of the week. We are well under that now, down about 15 per cent," Mr Burke said.

"What it means is ... retailers might not have 600 gram free range packs, or 800 gram caged eggs. They might still have eggs but not exactly in that same category. So consumers might have to switch from the normal egg they buy to another brand or category to get through that period."

Mr Burke said the shortage had already created a lift in farm gate prices, which have risen 10 cents a dozen. He said that would filter through to retailers.

The outbreak was detected in late October at the Langfield Pastoral Company, about 27 kilometres north-east of Young in south-west NSW.

Mr Burke said the farm was a "world class facility" and an outbreak of an exotic disease is something all farmers feared, particularly as more birds become free to roam.

It is understood the virus originated at the property’s free range farm and soon spread to its neighbouring caged farm.

Farm Pride sales and marketing manager Ian Savenake said Langfield supplied between 3 and 4 per cent of the national market.

He said the stock in Farm Pride’s cool room in Melbourne had dwindled significantly.

"I probably have a day’s worth of fridge at the moment tops, whereas this time last year we had five days’ worth of stock so it’s going to be a tighter Christmas," Mr Savenake said.

"There’s quite a lift in demand with just people baking and entertaining. But we are cutting orders at the moment. We just can’t supply everyone’s order in full."

The DPI has quarantined both farms, which will remain shut for several weeks.

Mr Savenake said it would take some time for the farms to repopulate their stock, because they couldn’t replace the 450,000 chickens all at once.

"Normally you stagger 50,000 every month, so I’m guessing at least six to 12 months, depending on how quickly they can buy the day old chicks."

In a statement the DPI said the NSW Food Authority confirmed that there no food safety issues and poultry and eggs remained safe to eat.

NSW chief veterinary officer Ian Roth said it appeared the virus had been confined to the two properties.

"There is no indication that the virus has spread beyond the two properties, and the DPI is working with the owners to recommence operations," Dr Roth said.

A Woolworths spokeswoman said: "Customers in NSW and Victoria may notice some gaps in egg supply in stores. We have been working with our suppliers to maintain supply and minimise any impact on customers."

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #40 on: December 12, 2013, 01:00:43 PM »

China's Report Slight Drop in Egg Prices
11 December 2013


CHINA - Farm produce prices in 36 major Chinese cities rose slightly in the week ending 8 December compared with the previous week, according to a Ministry of Commerce statement.

The wholesale price of pork went up 0.3 per cent, while the cost of beef and mutton rose 0.5 per cent and 0.2 per cent, respectively.

The average wholesale price of aquatic products gained 0.6 per cent and the cost of rice and peanut oil went up 0.2 per cent and 0.1 per cent, respectively.

The price of vegetables and eggs dropped slightly last week. The average wholesale price of 18 kinds of vegetables dipped 2.3 per cent from a week earlier and that of eggs down 0.2 per cent.

Food accounts for about one third of China's consumer price index (CPI), a main gauge of inflation.

The CPI grew three per cent year on year in November, down from 3.2 per cent in October, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on Monday.

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #41 on: December 16, 2013, 04:03:29 AM »

Increased Vitamin D3 Improved Some Welfare Measures in Broilers
13 December 2013


CHINA - A new study shows that increasing dietary vitamin D3 improved broilers gait score and bone strength and reduced foot pad dermatitis and hock burns.

Data from an experiment in China indicate that increasing supplemental vitamin D3 has favourable effects on walking ability and welfare status of broilers kept at high stocking density; there was no effect on their performance.

Z.W. Sun from the China Agricultural University in Beijing and co-authors there and at New Hope Liuhe Co. Ltd. and Shandong Agricultural University explain in the current issue of Poultry Science that they conducted a study to evaluate the effects of varying dietary vitamin D3 and stocking density on growing performance, carcass characteristics, bone biomechanical properties and welfare responses in Ross 308 broilers.

Experimental diets, containing one, 10 or 20 times the NRC recommended level of vitamin D3 (200IU per kg), were formulated with low-, medium- or high-vitamin D3 levels for three growing phases. Two stocking densities were 10 and 16 birds per square metre. Day-old hatchlings (1,872 males) were randomly assigned to six pens in each treatment.

Results showed that high stocking density decreased feed intake, bodyweight gain (P<0.01), breast muscle yield (P=0.010) and tibial development (P<0.01). However, high stocking density increased feed conversion ratio (P<0.001) and the scores of gait, footpad and hock burn, and abdominal plumage damage (P<0.01), particularly toward the age when birds attained their market size.

Increasing dietary vitamin D3 improved the birds’ walking ability and tibial quality (P<0.05) and reduced the development of footpad or hock dermatitis and abdominal plumage damage (P<0.01), some aspects of which were age-dependent and appeared to vary with stocking density.

Reference

Sun Z.W., L. Yan, Y.Y. G, J.P. Zhao,, H. Lin and Y.M. Guo. 2013. Increasing dietary vitamin D3 improves the walking ability and welfare status of broiler chickens reared at high stocking densities

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #42 on: December 24, 2013, 07:13:03 AM »

Thailand's Chicken Market to Improve
23 December 2013


THAILAND - The Thai chicken meat industry is expected to improve next year next year, while one processing company experiencing financial troubles is reported to have received financial backing.

Broiler producer, Saha Farms, has reportedly been granted 2.7 billion baht (THB; around US$83 million) by a creditor, according to The Nation.

The newspaper estimates this will be enough to maintain production at 600,000 to 800,000 chickens per week or one-quarter of its capacity of 2.5 million birds. This level should not have a great impact on the industry.

The outlook for the broiler business in 2014 should be better, continues the report, as markets in Asia are beginning to allow import of Thai fresh broiler products. Singapore is first, announcing last week that it has opened its markets and the industry expects Japan to follow suit.

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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2013, 07:48:02 AM »

Sexing Chicks in the Backyard Flock
17 December 2003


By R. Keith Bramwell, Extension Poultry Specialist for the University of Arkansas's Avian Advice - This article looks at accurate methods of determining the sex of baby chicks.
 
 
More on the Author
R.K. Bramwell
Extension Reproductive Physiologist
 
Introduction

Many backyard flock owners wonder: “When my baby chicks grow up, will they be boys or girls, roosters or hens, lay eggs to eat or crow endlessly in the early morning hours?” Regulations against owning roosters within city limits may exist in some of the larger cities. Not wanting to watch roosters fight and possibly injure each other in the hustle to establish dominance in their little world, or simply wanting to have a flock of only hens to gather the eggs each day for the family to eat. These are some points that cause concern and are important for the backyard chicken grower who tries to sex their chickens before they hatch, or grow up in this case.

“Old Wives Tales” about Sexing

Sexing baby chicks is not an easy process. There are a few who would try to simplify the matter with “old wives’ tales” of how to sex baby chicks. One method often repeated is tying a needle or a weight to the end of a piece of string (if the subject to be tested is an expectant mothers’ stomach, use a wedding ring on a string) and hold it over the young animal. One interpretation of this method says that if the object rotates in a clock-wise circle, it is a male; if it rotates counter-clock-wise, it is a female.

 Similarly, with the same object on a string held over the baby chick, the motion of the hanging object in any circular pattern indicates a female while movement of the object back and forth indicates a male. Success of this method has been “reported” to be as high as “it will work every time” to “it works most of the time.” In actuality, one should expect to be accurate about 50% of the time when determining the sex of baby chicks in this manner (accuracy may be slightly higher for inherently lucky individuals).

 A second method is to observe the shape of an egg to determine the sex of the potential young chick to be hatched. One individual explained that the different sexes require different shaped eggs for optimum growth within the shell and that the hen’s body knows which sex the chick would be. Football-shaped eggs house boy chicks, and more oval or round-shaped eggs will house girl chicks. He went on to say he was “nearly 100% accurate” when sexing chicks by this method. In actuality, the shell of the egg is formed simply by the presence of any object within the oviduct.

 Years ago someone surgically placed an engagement ring in the upper portions of the oviduct and allowed the hen to form an egg (albumen and shell, no yolk) around the ring. The egg was then given to the girl in the form of a marriage proposal. The ring had no sex, but the shell was formed regardless. Similarly, a rock placed in the oviduct or more naturally sometimes detached body tissues in the oviduct can stimulate the formation of an egg by the hen. The accuracy of this method is about 50%, again, slightly higher for lucky individuals.

 In a recent meeting it was mentioned that birds might be similar to reptiles in that the temperature in which the eggs are incubated largely determines the sex of the developing chick. Imagine if this were true, how valuable this would be to the poultry industry! Commercial egg producers could hatch only young pullets; chicken and turkey meat producers could hatch male chicks for one market and female chicks for a different market. Unfortunately, it is not quite that simple in domestic poultry. Too much deviation from the optimum incubation temperatures will most certainly result in fewer chicks hatched. Likely some of each sex will be lost.

Accurate Methods of Sexing

Fortunately, there are some methods for sexing baby chicks that are actually accurate. Using our knowledge of genetics with the proper breeding scheme, day old baby chicks can be sexed based upon their color. This is possible when using what is called sex-linked color traits. Mating barred hens (black and white striped feathers) with non-barred males results in barred males and nonbarred female chicks. This can also be accomplished using birds carrying specific genes for silver and gold color patterns in the roosters and hens (silver males bred with gold females results in silver pullets and gold cockerels). From a genetic standpoint (excluding mutations), this method is always accurate.

 Vent sexing baby chicks is a method popularized in the 1930s by a Japanese professor, Kiyoshi Masui. Individuals well trained at chick sexing schools can consistently and easily attain greater than 95% accuracy. This method involves holding the day old chick upside down in one hand and while visually examining the vent area for the presence or absence of a rudimentary male sex organ.

 This method sounds much easier than it really is. After being taught the basics of this technique from non-professionals, most people would be doing well to obtain 60-70% accuracy at best. However, if interested, additional written information on this technique can be obtained from the Center of Excellence for Poultry Science at the University of Arkansas. Most commercial hatcheries that offer chicks for sale as either pullets or cockerels utilize this method.

 All in all, the best way to sex chickens in the backyard flock is to watch them grow. Feed them, water them, observe them and enjoy them while they mature. As they develop, changes will become obvious as the males will begin to act manly and their voices will change from the chirping common to young chicks to attempted crows. In nearly all breeds of chickens (Sebrights being the exception) the young males’ feathers will also change from the round oval-shaped feathers common to hens and young birds to the shiny, more narrow and pointed feathers found on their necks and at the base of their tails.

 Additionally, the combs of the young roosters will begin to develop at an earlier age than they will in females. While this may vary from breed to breed and, in some breeds, might even be difficult to detect a difference; in most breeds of chickens with large combs, this is a very obvious distinction between young roosters and hens as they are maturing. In short, enjoy the birds and watch them grow. This is definitely the most enjoyable method when establishing a backyard flock.

Summary

While a number of “old wives tales” exist about sexing chicks, these methods are no better than flipping a coin. While feather sexing and vent sexing are accurate methods of determining the sex of chicks, perhaps the best and most enjoyable method is just watching the birds grow.


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Re: World Poultry News
« Reply #44 on: January 08, 2014, 10:23:45 AM »

Saudi Delegation Satisfied over Poultry Standards in Pakistan
07 January 2014


PAKISTAN - A four-member Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) delegation has expressed satisfaction over the standard of poultry facilities in Pakistan, describing them as equivalent to any European country.

The Saudi delegation visited different poultry farms in the country to inspect the standard of the poultry facilities, according to a press release issued in the country last week, on 3 January.

According to the Associated Press of Pakistan (APP), the delegation also visited the National Reference Laboratory for Poultry Diseases and National Veterinary Laboratory situated at NARC (National Agricultural Research Center) in Islamabad and expressed satisfaction over their standards.

It may be noted that Saudi Arabia had suspended imports of hatching eggs and day-old chicks from Pakistan in 2005-06 due to the eruption of bird flu.

The SFDA delegation also held a meeting with senior officials of Ministry of National Food Security & Research (MNFSR), which was presided over by Secretary Seerat Asghar.

Seerat Asghar apprised the delegation of various preventive and precautionary measures undertaken by Pakistan to successfully contain the H5NI virus since 2005.

The Secretary also announced that a successful “National Programme for the Control and Prevention of Avian Influenza” was launched at a total cost of 1180.142 for the control of the disease.

He also informed about various measures undertaken complying with international standards to modernise poultry industry infrastructure and facilities.

Mr Asghar further stated that due to concerted efforts and hardwork Pakistan declared freedom from bird flu disease with effect from 22 September 2008 and since then the poultry industry has been growing at an annual rate of 13 per cent.

Mr Asghar also hoped that Saudi Arabia might soon restore import of poultry products from Pakistan.

The dignitaries on both sides also agreed that there was a great potential of trade in the areas of poultry and livestock between the two countries. Both sides also agreed that there was a need to further strengthen bilateral trade between two brotherly countries.

 

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