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nemo

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Gabing San Fernando
« on: February 14, 2009, 01:10:59 AM »
Gabing San Fernando (Yautia sp.) as Potential Feed Ingredient for Commercialization in Swine Ration

Feeds comprise about 70% of the total cost of swine production. During the review of the FSSRI-BAR project entitled �Improving the Integration of Animal Production in the Upland Farming Systems of Selected Communities in Mt. Banahaw� in December 1999, trials on alternative feeds for swine was suggested by the Officers of the partner farmers organizations. Among the alternative feed ingredients mentioned were cassava (Manihot esculenta) and the corms of Gabing San Fernando (Yautia sp. , Family Araceae) locally known as sakwa.

The use of cassava had already been studied as an alternative to corn for feeds. Results of several experiments have proven that the performance of animals given with cassava-based feeds is comparable to those fed with corn based rations. However, its use as feeds was constrained by the availability of the materials. Demand for starch and table consumption are higher, hence the price of raw materials become prohibitive for feeds.

On the other hand, sakwa, a by-product of gabi production, is traditionally used as feeds for swine parti-cularly at the finishing stage. The sliced sakwa and gabi leaves are usually given fresh or boiled with feed concentrates.

Among other root crops grown in the Philippines, gabi ranks third to sweet potato and cassava in production and hectarage. It is generally grown as a backyard crop. Gabing San Fernando is the Tagalog term for Yautia or Tannia (Common name). This is also referred to as Takudo in Cebuano and Butig in Waray. Gabing San Fernando is a robust slant and generally adapted in the upland condition. It thrives best in deep, loose, friable and sandy loam soil with abundant organic matter and moisture. It is well adapted in plateaus and can withstand even soils dominated by cogon. Although it can be planted anytime of the year it performs best when planted at the start of the rainy season. This crop is resistant to adverse climatic conditions including drought and relatively resistant to pest and diseases.

Gabing San Fernando ranks second to sweet potato in terms of nutritive value and digestibility. Sakwa of Gabing San Fernando has a crude protein (7.67%) comparable to that of corn, thus giving it a greater potential use as feed ingredient. It has a more or less spherical shape while the cormels are flask-shaped, usually larger than those of gabi.

A preliminary study on the feeding of sakwa-based feed rations to swine fatteners was conducted by the Farming Systems and Soil Resources Institute (FSSRI) in Barangay Pinagdanglayan, Dolores, Quezon under the project supported by the Bureau of Agricultural Research (BAR).

Drying of sakwa was tried by air drying, sun drying or through mechanical drier. Air-drying requires at least five days to attain 14% moisture and sun drying, 3 days. Initial trial was also made using the CEAT multi-purpose drier. Chipping of sakwa is done manually or with the use of a mechanical chipper. Manual chipping is slow and laborious with an output of 9-20 kg/hr/person. Slices can either cross-sectional or longitudinal. Longitudinal slices are more advantageous than the cross sectional or oval cuts because they dry faster. Dried chips that are not milled right away are stored in sacks or containers that can be tightly closed to prevent moisture reabsorption. The use of mechanical drier and chipper are potentially economical if operation will be made on a large scale.

In the on-farm trial conducted for the utilization of sakwa-based feed ration for swine fattening, dried sakwa was used as a replacement for the corn component of the feeds. Corn was replaced in the ration at 50% for the grower feeds and 75% for the finisher rations. The feed formulation was prepared in cooperation with Luntian Multi-purpose Cooperative, Inc. (LMC). The LMC milled the dried sakwa and mixed with the feed ration.

There were three farmer-partners involved in the trial. Each farmer had nine fatteners which were crossbred of Landrace and Yorkshire from the Institute of Animal Science, UPLB. The fatteners were divided into three groups with the first group serving as the control and was fed with commercially available feeds used in the area. The second group was fed with sakwa based-feed starting from growing stage (about 30-35 kg per head) while the last group was fed with sakwa-based feed only during the finishing stage (60 kg above).

Results of the trial showed no significant differences on the average daily gain (600 g/day) and final weight (80 kg) among the test animals after four months of fattening. Meat color was comparable while backfat thickness was acceptable for all treatments. However, differrences in the net benefit was observed. Sakwa-based feeds had lower cost compared to corn-based ration. Partial budget analysis showed a higher net benefit in the feeding of sakwa-based feeds to swine starting at the grower stage. Animals fed with sakwa-based rations realized a net benefit of about P 740 per head of swine while those fed with commercial feeds has about P 340 per head.

Considering the savings in the cost of feeds and the insignificant differences in weight gain compared to animals fed with commercial feeds, the use of sakwa-based feed rations for swine has potentials as feeds. Besides, sakwa is a by-product of the production of Gabing San Fernando and produced with less external inputs. There are no imported fertilizers and insecticides component in the production process. The utilization of Gabing San Fernando as the main ingredient of swine feed rations can reduce our dependence on corn as feed ingredients. Studies could also be done on the potential of sakwa-based feeds for cattle fattening and poultry (V.T. Villancio, R.V. Labios and D.R Dahilig)

source:community.uplb
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edomc

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Re: Gabing San Fernando
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2012, 04:07:58 PM »
Hi Doc Nemo,

I am avid fun of this forum and i found it very helpful. I am not in the swine business - but working with one international NGOs here in asia- i am based in Cambodia. We are supportin a pig and poultry raising project through our local NGO partners - in what we called social business project. But due to lack of technical know how or very selfish type of culture in Cambodia sharing skills and knowledge is difficultit ito get or very expensive technical support which is not even give their best.

Our partners in currently using commercial feeds (starter to finisher) for pigs and chicken which in end does not give good result. We are interested to get some skills and knowledge to produce alternative feeds with right formulation for a better income of the poor families here and unfortunately we cant get one here. Almost the same as what you are explaining in your thread.

We also very interested to know more on how we can produce our own pre mix or concentrate. I wonder if you can help me to link to other groups / institution / schools / indvidual or even you who have these capacities i have mentioned in the philippines and who can help us in this kind of endeavour and willing to help other people which are not filipinos. Logistical arrangement and others attached  can be discussed. my email is edgar_montalban@yahoo.com; edgar.montalban@icsasia.org - our website is www.ics.nl my phone number is +85577-458909 you can even text me from my smart roaming number 09475356850.

I am looking forward to hear from you.



petersotan

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Re: Gabing San Fernando
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 07:23:48 PM »
Gabing San Fernando (Yautia sp.) as Potential Feed Ingredient for Commercialization in Swine Ration

Feeds comprise about 70% of the total cost of swine production. During the review of the FSSRI-BAR project entitled �Improving the Integration of Animal Production in the Upland Farming Systems of Selected Communities in Mt. Banahaw� in December 1999, trials on alternative feeds for swine was suggested by the Officers of the partner farmers organizations. Among the alternative feed ingredients mentioned were cassava (Manihot esculenta) and the corms of Gabing San Fernando (Yautia sp. , Family Araceae) locally known as sakwa.

The use of cassava had already been studied as an alternative to corn for feeds. Results of several experiments have proven that the performance of animals given with cassava-based feeds is comparable to those fed with corn based rations. However, its use as feeds was constrained by the availability of the materials. Demand for starch and table consumption are higher, hence the price of raw materials become prohibitive for feeds.

On the other hand, sakwa, a by-product of gabi production, is traditionally used as feeds for swine parti-cularly at the finishing stage. The sliced sakwa and gabi leaves are usually given fresh or boiled with feed concentrates.

Among other root crops grown in the Philippines, gabi ranks third to sweet potato and cassava in production and hectarage. It is generally grown as a backyard crop. Gabing San Fernando is the Tagalog term for Yautia or Tannia (Common name). This is also referred to as Takudo in Cebuano and Butig in Waray. Gabing San Fernando is a robust slant and generally adapted in the upland condition. It thrives best in deep, loose, friable and sandy loam soil with abundant organic matter and moisture. It is well adapted in plateaus and can withstand even soils dominated by cogon. Although it can be planted anytime of the year it performs best when planted at the start of the rainy season. This crop is resistant to adverse climatic conditions including drought and relatively resistant to pest and diseases.

Gabing San Fernando ranks second to sweet potato in terms of nutritive value and digestibility. Sakwa of Gabing San Fernando has a crude protein (7.67%) comparable to that of corn, thus giving it a greater potential use as feed ingredient. It has a more or less spherical shape while the cormels are flask-shaped, usually larger than those of gabi.

A preliminary study on the feeding of sakwa-based feed rations to swine fatteners was conducted by the Farming Systems and Soil Resources Institute (FSSRI) in Barangay Pinagdanglayan, Dolores, Quezon under the project supported by the Bureau of Agricultural Research (BAR).

Drying of sakwa was tried by air drying, sun drying or through mechanical drier. Air-drying requires at least five days to attain 14% moisture and sun drying, 3 days. Initial trial was also made using the CEAT multi-purpose drier. Chipping of sakwa is done manually or with the use of a mechanical chipper. Manual chipping is slow and laborious with an output of 9-20 kg/hr/person. Slices can either cross-sectional or longitudinal. Longitudinal slices are more advantageous than the cross sectional or oval cuts because they dry faster. Dried chips that are not milled right away are stored in sacks or containers that can be tightly closed to prevent moisture reabsorption. The use of mechanical drier and chipper are potentially economical if operation will be made on a large scale.

In the on-farm trial conducted for the utilization of sakwa-based feed ration for swine fattening, dried sakwa was used as a replacement for the corn component of the feeds. Corn was replaced in the ration at 50% for the grower feeds and 75% for the finisher rations. The feed formulation was prepared in cooperation with Luntian Multi-purpose Cooperative, Inc. (LMC). The LMC milled the dried sakwa and mixed with the feed ration.

There were three farmer-partners involved in the trial. Each farmer had nine fatteners which were crossbred of Landrace and Yorkshire from the Institute of Animal Science, UPLB. The fatteners were divided into three groups with the first group serving as the control and was fed with commercially available feeds used in the area. The second group was fed with sakwa based-feed starting from growing stage (about 30-35 kg per head) while the last group was fed with sakwa-based feed only during the finishing stage (60 kg above).

Results of the trial showed no significant differences on the average daily gain (600 g/day) and final weight (80 kg) among the test animals after four months of fattening. Meat color was comparable while backfat thickness was acceptable for all treatments. However, differrences in the net benefit was observed. Sakwa-based feeds had lower cost compared to corn-based ration. Partial budget analysis showed a higher net benefit in the feeding of sakwa-based feeds to swine starting at the grower stage. Animals fed with sakwa-based rations realized a net benefit of about P 740 per head of swine while those fed with commercial feeds has about P 340 per head.

Considering the savings in the cost of feeds and the insignificant differences in weight gain compared to animals fed with commercial feeds, the use of sakwa-based feed rations for swine has potentials as feeds. Besides, sakwa is a by-product of the production of Gabing San Fernando and produced with less external inputs. There are no imported fertilizers and insecticides component in the production process. The utilization of Gabing San Fernando as the main ingredient of swine feed rations can reduce our dependence on corn as feed ingredients. Studies could also be done on the potential of sakwa-based feeds for cattle fattening and poultry (V.T. Villancio, R.V. Labios and D.R Dahilig)

source:community.uplb


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dylaN_uR

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Re: Gabing San Fernando
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2013, 02:30:04 PM »
Yan ba yung rootcrop na may scientific name na Xanthosoma spp.? Kung tawagin sa'min yan dito sa Baybay City, Leyte ay "pakudo". Alam ko madali lang yan palakihin at padamihin. Ginagamit yan sa panghalo sa mga gulay dito sa'min. Dati ko na rin naisip ang potential ng Xanthosoma as feed ingredient nung nasa Visayas State University pa ako nagtratrabaho. Nagbasa na ako sa mga literature about Xanthosoma para gawing feed ingredient,ang isa sa nabasa kong drawback ay ang mataas ang "Oxalate" na content nito na posibleng makasama sa mga hayop kung masobrahan. Kaya sa tingin ko ay para magamit full-scale ang rootcrop na ito para gawing feed ingredient ay kung makakakita tayo ng process na makapababa ng Oxalate content nito o kung makahanap tayo ng bagong cultivar na mababa ang oxalate content.

dupayseedstrading

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Seeds for sale
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 11:12:03 AM »
Seeds for sale

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