Google
Pinoyagribusiness
June 24, 2024, 12:34:36 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
affordable vet products
News: 150 days from birth is the average time you need to sell your pigs for slaughter and it is about 85 kgs on average.
 
  Home   Forum   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 26 27 [28]
  Print  
Author Topic: WorldWatch:  (Read 34339 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #405 on: June 25, 2012, 08:11:00 AM »


Adapting to a Changing Climate
22 June 2012



UK - Most scientists agree the UK environment of the future will be different from today - temperature and rainfall (both occurrence and intensity), as well as levels of carbon dioxide and ozone in the atmosphere, will change over the coming years and decades.
 
So while day-length duration will remain constant, we have to anticipate entirely new combinations of conditions. These will not have previously been experienced anywhere in the world by the crops on which we and our farm animals depend. If the levels of food production we'll require in the future are to be secured, steps to adapt to these changes need to be taken now.
 
That's the clear assessment from experts at the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) in response to the government's recently proposed National Adaptation Programme on climate change, focused on the next 20 years. The response also confirms AHDB's commitment to give farmers and growers practical support on adaptation.

In welcoming the chance to join the Defra-led consultation, the levy board identifies water availability and management as the most immediate concern for UK agriculture in adapting to climate change, since it impacts on arable crops, horticulture and livestock production. Investment will be needed in new infrastructure for water capture and storage, as well as research to discover new ways of increasing water use efficiency in agricultural production systems.
 
Chief Scientist at AHDB, Professor Ian Crute, said: "We're going to need to start developing crop and livestock types and production systems that are well adapted and resilient to the changing combinations of environmental conditions we experience in the future.
 
"Increased and well-targeted investment in the application of crop and livestock genomics is going to be absolutely essential. Soils and the semi-natural ecosystems that impact on agricultural production are also going to be affected by climate change and we need to better understand what these impacts will be and adapt accordingly," he added.
 
"Farmers and growers continuously adapt and innovate in response to change but, certainly, effective new knowledge acquisition and exchange will be essential if the agriculture industry is to adapt to changes in our climate at the appropriate pace. AHDB is committed to helping farmers and growers to adopt practical adaptation measures, making sure that industry advice is consistent and always based on sound evidence.
 
"Our own applied research, such as the evaluation of new crop varieties, will continue and evolve over time to meet these challenges.
 
"I can also see that changes to the way agriculture operates in adapting to new weather conditions will require careful communication with the public, to explain why we need to build more on-farm reservoirs, for example.
 
The AHDB view of adapting to climate change also focuses on soil quality and on new potential challenges to crop and animal health.
 
Insect pests and insect-transmitted plant and animal diseases are a concern. As AHDB sees it, effective surveillance and pre-emptive research will be needed to reduce the risk of exotic diseases and pest outbreaks.
 
With the vital need to up the pace on restoring levels of organic matter content in soils, more thought will need to be given to how such restoration and maintenance will be affected by changes in agricultural practices or temperature-induced increases in the rate of breakdown of organic matter.
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #406 on: June 28, 2012, 09:46:58 AM »


China Farm Produce Prices Still Rising
27 June 2012


CHINA - Pork prices rebounded recently, up 0.7 per cent last week, after falling for several months, as the country's pork stockpiling policy helped boost market demand, Shen said at a regular briefing.

China started stockpiling frozen pork in April to help stabilize prices and stem losses by pig producers.
 
Due to booming demand, shrinking supplies and climbing production costs, prices of edible oil and aquatic products rose slightly last week. Retail prices of peanut oil increased 0.3 per cent week-on-week, while the wholesale prices of aquatic products gained 0.7 per cent.
 
Shen Danyang, spokesman for the Ministry of Commerce, said prices of garlic and eggs have begun falling. "The ministry has always attached great importance to the dramatic fluctuations of farm produce prices, and will try to solve the boom-bust problem in agriculture as soon as possible," he added.
 
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #407 on: July 03, 2012, 01:03:44 AM »

28 June 2012
USDA Agricultural Prices - June 2012
The preliminary All Farm Products Index of Prices Received by Farmers in June, at 181 percent, based on 1990-1992=100, increased 3 points (1.7 percent) from May. The Crop Index is up 2 points (1.0 percent) and the Livestock Index increased 1 point (0.7 percent).


 

June Farm Prices Received Index Increased 3 Points
 
Producers received higher prices for hogs, oranges, eggs, and broccoli and lower prices for hay, corn, soybeans, and broilers. In addition to prices, the overall index is also affected by the seasonal change based on a 3-year average mix of commodities producers sell. Increased monthly movement of wheat and hay offset the decreased marketing of oranges, corn, cattle, and strawberries.
 
The preliminary All Farm Products Index is up 1 point (0.6 percent) from June 2011. The Food Commodities Index, at 170, increased 4 points (2.4 percent) from last month but decreased 1 point (0.6 percent) from June 2011.
 
Prices Paid Index Unchanged
 
The June Index of Prices Paid for Commodities and Services, Interest, Taxes, and Farm Wage Rates (PPITW) is 215 percent of the 1990-1992 average. The index is unchanged from May but 12 points (5.9 percent) above June 2011. Higher prices in June for complete feeds, concentrates, nitrogen, and supplements offset lower prices for diesel, hay & forages, LP gas, and gasoline.
 


Prices Received by Farmers
 
The June All Farm Products Index is 181 percent of its 1990-1992 base, up 1.7 percent from the May index and 0.6 percent above the June 2011 index.
 
All crops: The June index, at 210, increased 1.0 percent from May and 0.5 percent from June 2011. Index increases for fruits & nuts and commercial vegetables more than offset the index decreases for feed grains & hay, oilseeds, food grains, and potatoes & dry beans.
 
Food grains: The June index, at 213, is 2.3 percent below the previous month and down 12 percent from a year ago. The June price for all wheat, at $6.37 per bushel, is down 30 cents from May and $1.04 below June 2011.
 
Feed grains & hay: The June index, at 265, is down 2.9 percent from last month but 1.1 percent above a year ago. The corn price, at $6.25 per bushel, is down 8 cents from last month and 13 cents below June 2011. The all hay price, at $183 per ton, is down $16.00 from May but $20.00 higher than last June. Sorghum grain, at $9.95 per cwt, is 45 cents below May and 55 cents below June last year.
 
Cotton, Upland: The June index, at 137, is down 2.1 percent from May but unchanged from last year. The June price, at 83.1 cents per pound, is down 1.5 cents from the previous month and 0.2 cent below last June.
 
Oilseeds: The June index, at 245, is down 2.0 percent from May but 3.4 percent higher than June 2011. The soybean price, at $13.70 per bushel, decreased 30 cents from May but is 50 cents above June 2011.
 
Fruits & nuts: The June index, at 179, is up 5.3 percent from May and 13 percent higher than a year ago. Price increases for apples and oranges more than offset price decreases for peaches, strawberries, and lemons.
 
Commercial vegetables: The June index, at 166, is up 5.1 percent from last month but unchanged from June 2011. Price increases during June for broccoli and lettuce more than offset price declines for onions, snap beans, and cucumbers.
 
Potatoes & dry beans: The June index, at 180, is down 3.2 percent from last month and 8.2 percent below June 2011. The all potato price, at $9.89 per cwt, is down 55 cents from May and $1.70 below last June. The all dry bean price, at $43.90 per cwt, is up 60 cents from the previous month and $10.10 above June 2011.
 
Livestock and products: The June index, at 152, is 0.7 percent above last month but down 0.7 percent from June 2011. Compared with a year ago, prices are higher for cattle, broilers, calves, turkeys, and eggs. Prices for milk and hogs are down from last year.
 
Meat animals: The June index, at 161, is up 1.3 percent from last month and 10 percent higher than last year. The June hog price, at $66.90 per cwt, is up $4.10 from May but $2.80 lower than a year ago. The June beef cattle price of $122 per cwt is unchanged from last month but $15.00 higher than June 2011.
 
Dairy products: The June index, at 123, is down 0.8 percent from a month ago and 24 percent lower than June last year. The June all milk price of $16.10 per cwt is 10 cents less than last month and $5.00 lower than June 2011.
 
Poultry & eggs: The June index, at 164, is up 0.6 percent from May and 5.8 percent above a year ago. The June market egg price, at 68.8 cents per dozen, increased 9.4 cents from May and is 0.1 cent above June 2011. The June broiler price, at 52.0 cents per pound, is down 1.0 cent from May but 3.0 cents above a year ago. The June turkey price, at 73.9 cents per pound, is up 1.3 cents from the previous month and 4.4 cents above a year earlier.
 




June 2012
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #408 on: July 07, 2012, 10:45:16 AM »


FAO Food Price Index Falls Again
05 July 2012


GLOBAL - The FAO Food Price Index fell for the third consecutive month in June 2012, dipping 1.8 percent from May to its lowest level since September 2010. The four-point drop in June brought the index to 201 points from a revised level of 205 points in May 2012.
 
According to FAO, the index now stands at 15.4 per cent below its peak in February 2011. The average prices of all commodity groups in the Index were below May levels, with the largest drop registered for oils and fats.
 
Continued economic uncertainties and generally adequate food supply prospects kept the index down although growing concerns over dry weather sent prices of some crops higher toward the end of the month.
 
Food commodity prices have started rising again recently, mostly because of adverse weather and this may result in a rebound of the Food Price Index in July.
 
FAO also lowered its forecast for 2012 world cereal production by more than 23 million tonnes from May, which is likely to result in a smaller build-up of global stocks by the end of seasons in 2013.
 
FAO’s new forecast for world cereal production in 2012 stands at 2 396 million tonnes, still a record level and 2 per cent up from the previous high registered last year.
 
Supply and demand situation adequate
 
According to FAO’s latest assessment, the overall supply and demand situation in 2012/13 remains adequate thanks to abundant supplies of rice, a leading food staple, and sufficient exportable supplies of wheat and coarse grains.
 
But grain prices were very volatile in June due to continuing dryness and above-average temperatures in most of the major maize growing regions of the United States. Adverse weather is diminishing prospects of an improvement in the maize supply situation and FAO is monitoring the development closely.
 
High-level event on volatility and speculation
 
The issue of swinging food prices will be discussed by a high-level event on “Food Price Volatility and Price Speculation” to be held at FAO on Friday, 6 July. Speakers will include Leonel Fernández, President of the Dominican Republic who will give a keynote address, and FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva.
 
“FAO has been actively involved in studying food price volatility and identifying appropriate policy responses,” said Mr Graziano da Silva. “Our analytical work is helping to deepen the understanding of the nature, causes and impacts of volatility and of what governments and other stakeholders can do about it.”
 
The FAO Food Price Index is a measure of the monthly change in average international prices of a basket of 55 food commodities.
 
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #409 on: July 15, 2012, 05:17:41 AM »

11 July 2012
USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) July 2012



 


LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND DAIRY:

The forecast for total meat production in 2012 is raised from last month as higher pork and poultry production more than offsets lower beef production. Although remaining below last year, hatchery data are pointing towards smaller declines in eggs set and heavier bird weights are adding to production. Turkey production is also forecast slightly higher, based on recent production data. Pork production is raised on heavier expected carcass weights. USDA’s Quarterly Hogs and Pigs report will be released on June 29 and provide an indication of producer farrowing intentions for the remainder of the year. Beef production is reduced slightly as lower steer and heifer slaughter more than offsets higher dressed weights and higher cow slaughter. Small changes are made to 2013 beef and pork forecasts, largely reflecting higher expected carcass weights. Broiler and turkey production forecasts for 2013 are unchanged. Offsetting changes are made to 2012 quarterly egg production forecasts but the annual forecasts for 2012 and 2013 are unchanged from last month.

Forecasts for 2012 beef, broiler, and turkey trade are adjusted to reflect first-quarter data. Forecasts for 2013 are unchanged from last month. Pork exports for 2012 are raised from last month on the strength of trade data to date with a slight increase in forecast exports for 2013. The cattle and turkey price forecasts for 2012 are unchanged from last month, but hog and broiler prices are reduced, reflecting larger production. Egg prices for 2012 are raised as recent prices have been stronger than expected. Prices for 2013 are unchanged.

The milk production forecast for 2012 is raised as cow numbers are expected to decline more slowly. The production forecast for 2013 is unchanged. Export forecasts are raised for both 2012 WASDE-507-5 and 2013 on expected strength in cheese and nonfat dry milk (NDM) sales. Imports on a skimsolids basis are reduced slightly on lower expected imports of several dairy products.

NDM and whey prices for 2012 are forecast lower than last month on higher production and weaker demand. However, the cheese price is raised at the low end of the range on stronger demand and the butter price range is narrowed. The Class III price forecast is lowered from last month as the weaker whey price more than offsets the slightly higher forecast cheese price and the Class IV price is lowered on the weaker NDM price. The all milk price forecast for 2012 is lowered to $16.85 to $17.25 per cwt. The all milk price for 2013 remains unchanged from last month at $17.25 to $18.25 per cwt.



WHEAT:

Projected U.S. wheat supplies for 2012/13 are lowered 51 million bushels with reduced carryin and lower forecast winter wheat production. Beginning stocks are lowered 40 million bushels with a 10-million-bushel increase in food use and a 30-million-bushel increase in exports for 2011/12. The increase in 2011/12 food use reflects higher-thanexpected flour milling during the January-March quarter as reported by the North American Millers’ Association. Exports are increased based on the strong pace of U.S. shipments during the final weeks of the old-crop marketing year.

U.S. all wheat production for 2012/13 is projected at 2,234 million bushels, down 11 million, with lower forecast winter wheat production and small reductions in forecast durum wheat production for Arizona and California. Winter wheat production is forecast 10 million bushels lower with reductions for Hard Red Winter (HRW) and Soft White Winter wheat. The largest production declines are in the HRW states of Nebraska and Colorado, but higher production for Oklahoma is partly offsetting. With reduced supplies and higher expected prices, feed and residual use is lowered 10 million bushels. Ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected 41 million bushels lower. The projected range for the 2012/13 season average farm price is raised 10 cents on both ends to $5.60 to $6.80 per bushel. This remains well below the record $7.25 per bushel projected for 2011/12.

Global wheat supplies for 2012/13 are lowered 7.0 million tons with beginning stocks lowered 1.5 million tons and world production expected down 5.5 million tons. Higher 2011/12 global consumption, fueled by increased global trade, reduces carryin for 2012/13. World production for 2012/13 is lowered reflecting reduced crop prospects in several exporting countries including Russia, EU-27, Turkey, and the United States. Russia production is reduced 3.0 million tons due to a continuation of spring dryness in key winter wheat producing areas and indications of crop development problems resulting from winter freeze damage. EU-27 production is reduced 1.0 million tons with reduced acreage in Germany, Poland, and Spain, only partly offset by higher expected yields in France and Bulgaria. Production is also lowered 1.0 million tons for Turkey as winter frost damage and disease problems reduce yields across the central growing areas on the Anatolia Plateau. Output is reduced 0.2 million tons for Syria as yield prospects decline for non-irrigated wheat in the country’s northeast.

Global wheat consumption for 2012/13 is lowered 4.6 million tons with reduced prospects for wheat feeding and food use. Wheat feeding is lowered for EU-27, Russia, and Turkey. Larger corn supplies and increased corn feeding more than offset the reduction for EU-27. Wheat food use is lowered for India, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. Increases in food use for Morocco and Turkey are partly offsetting. Global wheat exports are reduced 1.6 million tons WASDE-507-2 with a 2.0-million-ton reduction for Russia and 0.3-million-ton reductions for both Argentina and Turkey. India exports are raised 1.0 million tons as market conditions improve the competitiveness of private exports. World ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected at 185.8 million tons, down 2.4 million from last month.

COARSE GRAINS:

U.S. feed grain supplies for 2012/13 are virtually unchanged as adjustments to 2011/12 balance sheets are largely offsetting and projected 2012/13 production and use are unchanged on the month. Projected 2012/13 season average price ranges for corn, sorghum, barley, and oats are all unchanged.

Adjustments to corn usage for 2011/12 reflect the latest ethanol production and trade data. Corn used to produce ethanol in 2011/12 is projected 50 million bushels higher. Weekly ethanol production has increased since mid-April after gradually declining from the record levels of late December. The higher corn use projection assumes slightly lower ethanol production during the June-August quarter as compared with the same period last year. Corn exports are projected 50 million bushels lower as shipments and sales continue to fall off of the pace needed to reach last month’s projection. Tight domestic supplies and increased competition, especially from Brazil, are also expected to reduce U.S. export prospects during the summer months. Projected corn ending stocks for 2011/12 are unchanged, as is the 2011/12 season average farm price which remains at $5.95 to $6.25 per bushel.

Changes to the 2011/12 balance sheets for sorghum, barley, and oats are driven by the latest trade data and also mostly offsetting. Sorghum exports for 2011/12 are projected 10 million bushels lower, but offset by a 10-million-bushel increase in expected feed and residual use. Projected barley imports are raised 4 million bushels and exports are lowered 3 million bushels boosting ending stocks 7 million bushels. Oats ending stocks are projected 10 million bushels lower with projected imports lowered 15 million bushels and feed and residual use reduced 5 million bushels. Projected 2011/12 farm prices for all three feed grains are unchanged.

Global coarse grain supplies for 2012/13 are projected 4.8 million tons higher with increases in corn beginning stocks and production. Global corn beginning stocks are increased 1.6 million tons mostly reflecting higher 2011/12 production for Brazil and China. Brazil corn production is raised 2 million bushels for 2011/12. Despite lower reported area for the main season crop, the rapid expansion in area and nearly ideal weather for the second season (safrinha) crop is boosting Brazil’s corn production prospects to a record 69 million tons. Much of the expansion in safrinha corn has been in the Central West region, where corn is planted in January and a pronounced dry season typically begins by early May. This year’s rainy season extended through early June providing an additional 4 to 6 inches of beneficial rainfall for filling corn. China’s 2011/12 corn production is raised 1.0 million tons in line with recent revisions to official government estimates.

World corn production for 2012/13 is increased 4.2 million tons this month with increases in China, EU-27, and FSU-12. China production for 2012/13 is raised 2.0 million tons based on higher reported corn area as land planted to soybeans declines. EU-27 corn production is increased 1.1 million tons mostly on higher area and yields for Hungary. Production is up 0.8 million tons for Russia and 0.3 million tons for Belarus both on higher reported area. World barley production is lowered, however, with a 0.5-million-ton reduction for Turkey and 0.2- million-ton reduction for Syria.

Global 2012/13 coarse grain trade is projected higher this month on increased imports and exports of corn. Corn imports are raised for EU-27 and Indonesia. Corn exports are WASDE-507-3 increased for Russia and Belarus, both reflecting higher expected production and supplies. Higher imports and production support increased corn feeding in EU-27. Higher beginning stocks and production in China boost prospects for feeding, but a partly offsetting reduction in industrial use limits the increase in corn consumption. Russia corn feeding is lowered 0.3 million tons reflecting slower expected year-to-year growth in feed grain consumption with rising feeding efficiencies in pork and poultry production. Global corn consumption is increased 2.4 million tons. Global corn ending stocks are projected 3.4 million tons higher. Of the increase, 2.0 million tons are for China and 1.0 million tons are for Brazil.

RICE:

 A reduced 2011/12 U.S. rice ending stocks forecast results in a tighter supply outlook for 2012/13. Beginning stocks for 2012/13 are reduced 4.5 million cwt to 29.5 million—down 39 percent from the previous year, and the lowest beginning stocks since 2004/05.

Production and imports for 2012/13 are unchanged at 183.0 million cwt and 22.0 million, respectively. On the 2012/13 use side, domestic and residual use is lowered 1.0 million cwt to 122.0 million because of an expected decline in rice used in the brewing of beer—a trend observed in recent years. Monthly data recently released by the U.S. Department of the Treasury confirm the downward trend in 2011/12. Rice used in the brewing of beer through March is down 11 percent in 2011/12. The 2012/13 export forecast is lowered 2.0 million cwt to 87.0 million because of reduced exportable supplies—all in long-grain rice. U.S. 2012/13 ending stocks are projected at 25.5 million cwt, down 1.5 million from last month.

Smaller projected 2011/12 U.S. imports along with larger exports reduce 2011/12 ending stocks by 4.5 million cwt. U.S. rice imports for 2011/12 are projected at 20.0 million cwt, down 0.5 million from a month ago based on U.S. Bureau of the Census data through March. The pace of imports has slowed in recent months. Rice exports for 2011/12 are raised 4.0 million cwt to 101.0 million because of a significant pickup in sales and shipments in April and early May, and an increase in food-aid. Rough rice exports for 2011/12 are reduced 4.0 million cwt to 31.0 million based on Bureau of the Census data through April and export sales data through the end of May. Conversely, milled rice exports are raised 8 million cwt (roughequivalent basis) to 70 million with large shipments to Asia.

Rough rice price forecasts for 2012/13 are unchanged from last month. The 2012/13 longgrain U.S. season average farm price is projected at $14.50 to $15.50 per cwt, combined medium- and short-grain rice price is $17.25 to $18.25 per cwt, and the all rice price is $15.30 to $16.30 per cwt. The midpoint of the 2011/12 all rice, long-grain, and combined medium- and short-grain prices are unchanged from a month ago, however, the price range is narrowed 10 cents on each end of the range for each.

Global 2012/13 rice supply and use is little changed from a month ago. Global rice production is projected at a record 466.5 million tons, up less than 100,000 tons from last month. Global 2012/13 exports are raised nearly 1.0 million tons mainly due to an increase for India, now forecast at 7.0 million, up 1.0 million from last month, but down 1.0 million from revised 2011/12. India’s 2011/12 exports are raised to a record 8.0 million tons. Import 2012/13 forecasts are raised for Iran and several African countries. Global consumption for 2012/13 is raised 1.0 million tons, primarily due to larger consumption for Iran, Vietnam, and several African countries. Global ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected at 104.2 million tons, down 0.7 million from last month, due primarily to a reduction for India.

OILSEEDS:

This month’s U.S. soybean supply and use projections for 2012/13 include lower beginning and ending stocks and reduced use. Lower beginning stocks reflect increased export and crush projections for 2011/12. Soybean exports for 2011/12 are raised 20 million bushels to 1.335 billion bushels reflecting increased global import demand, led mainly by WASDE-507-4 higher projected imports for China. Soybean crush is raised 15 million bushels mostly due to stronger domestic soybean meal use. Soybean ending stocks for 2011/12 are projected at 175 million bushels, down 35 million. With reduced supplies for 2012/13, soybean exports are projected at 1.485 billion bushels, down 20 million. Soybean crush is also projected lower due to reduced domestic soybean meal use. Ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected at 140 million bushels, down 5 million from last month.

Soybean, meal, and oil price projections for 2012/13 are unchanged this month. The U.S. season average soybean price is projected at $12.00 to $14.00 per bushel. Soybean meal and oil prices are projected at $335 to $365 per ton and 52.5 to 56.5 cents per pound, respectively.

Global oilseed production for 2012/13 is projected at 470.8 million tons, down 0.7 million from last month, mainly due to lower soybean and cottonseed production. China’s soybean production is reduced 0.5 million tons due to lower area as producers shift planting decisions toward corn. Brazil’s cottonseed production is also reduced due to lower area planted to cotton as world prices have declined in recent weeks. Other changes include reduced rapeseed production for EU-27, increased rapeseed production for Russia, increased sunflowerseed production for EU-27, and reduced cottonseed production for Australia and Egypt. Brazil’s 2011/12 soybean production is increased 0.5 million tons to 65.5 million while Argentina soybean production is reduced 1 million tons to 41.5 million.

SUGAR: Projected U.S. sugar supply for fiscal year 2012/13 is increased 341,000 short tons, raw value, compared with last month. The increase is due to higher beginning stocks and imports from Mexico. Mexico’s exports of sugar estimated for 2011/12 and projected for 2012/13 are increased due to higher production for both years. Production data for Mexico’s 2011/12 season are nearly complete, while the increase for 2012/13 is based on a favorable growing season since February.

COTTON:

 This month’s U.S. cotton estimates for 2011/12 and 2012/13 show small revisions in trade, which leave 2012/13 ending stocks unchanged from last month. The 2012/13 production estimate of 17.0 million bales also is unchanged, pending further information about planted area and weather developments. Exports for 2011/12 are raised by 200,000 bales, reflecting recent strong sales and shipments, while exports for 2012/13 are reduced by 200,000 bales, due to lower expected foreign import demand. Domestic mill use is unchanged. The projected range for the 2012/13 season average price received by producers is 60 to 80 cents per pound, 5 cents below last month on each end. The world 2012/13 cotton projections include lower production, consumption, and trade relative to last month, with beginning and ending stocks projected slightly higher. World production is down 1.4 million bales, as the southern hemisphere producers of Brazil, Australia, and Argentina are expected to make further cuts in area in response to the recent sharp drop in cotton prices. World consumption is reduced about 1.0 million bales, as decreases for China and Thailand are partially offset by an increase for India. With world prices falling, China’s reserve floor price will make it increasingly difficult for mills there to be competitive producers of yarn. China’s 2012/13 imports also are reduced due mainly to larger estimated beginning stocks, accounting for most of the almost 700,000-bale reduction in world trade. World ending stocks projected at a record 74.5 million bales are raised 1 percent from last month, with China expected to hold 42 percent of the total.

The most significant revisions to the world 2011/12 cotton estimates include an increase of nearly 1.8 million bales in China’s imports, reflecting the continued strong pace of deliveries, and corresponding increases in exports for India, Brazil, Australia, the United States, and Malaysia. India’s balance sheet also is revised to reflect recent indications of higher consumption; a residual has been added for each year beginning in 2006/07 to offset a deficit in stocks that would otherwise result from the available statistics for production, consumption, and trade.
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #410 on: July 29, 2012, 12:19:26 AM »


Global Feed Industry Voices Alarm at Rising Feed Costs
26 July 2012

GLOBAL - The International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) has voiced an urgent concern that the rise in feed and food costs will continue unabated for the foreseeable future, in large part due to the diversion of feed and food grains and oilseeds into biofuels. This will result in critical pressure on feed manufacturers worldwide and higher prices for consumers.

“The dramatic drought in the US has highlighted once again the rising prices of feed and food and it is clear that the production of biofuels is in direct competition with food supplies by using land and water that would otherwise be used to grow crops for human or animal consumption”, said Alexandra de Athayde, IFIF Executive Director.

Mrs de Athayde added: “If no virgin food or feed crops were used to produce fuel, we believe prices would come down again. Current policies aimed at subsidizing the production of grains and oilseeds based biofuels harm the consumer and threaten the sustainability of the feed and food chain globally.”

 “The global challenge we face is to feed 9 billion people by 2050 and to do so sustainably. IFIF calls upon governments to reconsider subsidizing grains based biofuels in order to ensure we can use all of our feed and food production for human and animal consumption so that we meet current and future demands of 60 per cent more food by 2050.”
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #411 on: August 03, 2012, 08:52:35 AM »


3M Syrians Need Food, Crops and Livestock Assistance
02 August 2012

SYRIA - Close to three million people are in need of food, crops and livestock assistance, according to a recent assessment carried out by the United Nations and the Syrian government.

According to the FAO, of this number, around 1.5 million people need urgent and immediate food assistance over the next 3 to 6 months, especially in areas that have seen the greatest conflict and population displacement. Close to a million people need crop and livestock assistance such as seeds, food for animals, fuel and repair of irrigation pumps. Further scaling up of food and livelihoods assistance will be required over the next 12 months as the people needing nutritional support are expected to reach 3 million.
 
The findings are based on a Joint Rapid Food Security Needs Assessment mission conducted in June 2012 by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the UN World Food Programme (WFP) and Syria's Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform.
 
The joint mission's final report says the Syrian agricultural sector has lost a total of $1.8 billion this year as a result of the on-going crisis. This includes losses and damages to crops, livestock and irrigation systems. Strategic crops, such as wheat and barley, have been badly affected as well as cherry and olive trees, and vegetable production.
 
"While the economic implications of these losses are quite grave, the humanitarian implications are far more pressing," said WFP Representative in Syria Muhannad Hadi. "The effects of these major losses are first, and most viciously, felt by the poorest in the country. Most of the vulnerable families the mission visited reported less income and more expenditure - their lives becoming more difficult by the day," he said.
 
The assessment reports that as many as three million people are in need of assistance over the next 12 months. Large numbers of rural people of the central, coastal, eastern, northeastern and southern governorates were found to have totally or partially lost their farming assets and livestock-based livelihoods and businesses due to the on-going political crisis and insecurity, coupled with a prolonged drought.
 
Among those farmers needing immediate assistance, around one third of the rural population, 5 to 10 per cent are reported to be female-headed households.
 
"The most vulnerable families in Syria depend entirely or partly on agriculture and farm animals for food and income. They need emergency support, like seeds, repairs to irrigation systems, animal feed and healthcare," said Abdulla BinYehia, FAO Representative in Syria. "If timely assistance is not provided, the livelihood system of these vulnerable people could simply collapse in a few months' time. Winter is fast approaching and urgent action is needed before then."
 
Farmers have been forced to either abandon farming or leave standing crops unattended due to the unavailability of labour, the lack of fuel and the rise in fuel costs, and insecurity, as well as power cuts affecting water supply. Harvesting of wheat has been delayed in the Governorates of Daar'a, Rural Damascus, Homs and Hama. There is, thus, a great risk of losing part of the crop if there is further delay in providing assistance to these farmers.
 
The assessment mission also found that deforestation was on the rise with farmers turning back to the forest for fire wood due to unavailability of cooking gas and fuel. Some irrigation channels have also been clogged and damaged due to lack of labour and inaccessibility.
 
Far-reaching effects
 
Particular attention needs to be given to female-headed households and migrant workers, small farmers, Bedouins and herders. The livelihood of the migrant labourers in their places of origin is at serious threat due to lack of employment opportunities and fast depletion of their income. The sharp drop in remittances to rural households was also another blow to an already vulnerable population, especially in the northeastern and northern governorates.
 
Daar'a Governorate counted on remittances of nearly 200,000 migrant workers, reported the return of nearly 70 per cent of its labour force. A few families said they still have their men in Lebanon but were unable to send any remittance due to unemployment there.
 
With less or no income and very little savings, high recurring expenses, many mouths to feed, and fast depleting resources, these families are cutting the size and number of meals, eating cheaper lower quality food, buying food on credit, taking children out of school and sending them for work, selling livestock and other assets, and cutting back medical and education expenses.
 
Mr Hadi said that during the mission visit to Al Hassakeh "even the richest family in a village reported having food stock for only one more month."
 
WFP launched an emergency operation that started in October 2011 to cover the food needs of vulnerable people affected by the events in Syria. The operation progressively scaled up, reaching 540,000 people in July and aims to reach 850,000 people this month. WFP plans to further expand the operation as access to the affected areas allows. WFP's Syria operation is facing a funding shortfall of around $62 million on an overall budget of $103 million.
 
FAO has provided support since December 2011 to 9,052 small herders and farmers' households, representing some 82,000 people. FAO estimates that now around $38 million are required immediately for the next six months to help 112,500 rural households, or about 900,000 people, to ensure the autumn planting for cereals and keep livestock alive or replace lost ones.
 
Logged
Mustang Sally Farm
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1195


View Profile
« Reply #412 on: August 11, 2012, 09:31:15 AM »

USDA Agricultural Prices

Reports» USDA Agricultural Prices» USDA Agricultural Prices - 31 July 2012

02 August 2012
USDA Agricultural Prices - 31 July 2012
The preliminary All Farm Products Index of Prices Received by Farmers in July, at 193 percent, based on 1990-1992=100, increased 11 points (6.0 percent) from June. The Crop Index is up 20 points (9.4 percent) but the Livestock Index decreased 1 point (0.7 percent).



July Farm Prices Received Index Advanced 11 Points

Producers received higher prices for corn, wheat, soybeans, and hogs and lower prices for cattle, grapes, broilers, and broccoli. In addition to prices, the overall index is also affected by the seasonal change based on a 3-year average mix of commodities producers sell. Increased monthly movement of wheat, grapes, grain sorghum, and hay offset the decreased marketing of milk, potatoes, cantaloupes, and corn.
 
The preliminary All Farm Products Index is up 10 points (5.5 percent) from July 2011. The Food Commodities Index, at 178, increased 7 points (4.1 percent) from last month and increased 3 points (1.7 percent) from July 2011.
 
Prices Paid Index Up 1 Point
 
The July Index of Prices Paid for Commodities and Services, Interest, Taxes, and Farm Wage Rates (PPITW) is 215 percent of the 1990-1992 average. The index is up 1 point (0.5 percent) from June and 11 points (5.4 percent) above July 2011. Higher prices in July for feed grains, concentrates, nitrogen, and LP gas offset lower prices for feeder cattle, feeder pigs, diesel, and potash & phosphate.


 

Prices Received by Farmers
 
The July All Farm Products Index is 193 percent of its 1990-1992 base, up 6.0 percent from the June index and 5.5 percent above the July 2011 index.
 
All crops: The July index, at 233, increased 9.4 percent from June and is 10 percent above July 2011. Index increases for feed grains & hay, food grains, and oilseeds more than offset the index decreases for fruits & nuts, commercial vegetables, and potatoes & dry beans.
 
Food grains: The July index, at 275, is 23 percent above the previous month and 17 percent above a year ago. The July price for all wheat, at $8.31 per bushel, is up $1.61 from June and $1.21 above July 2011.
 
Feed grains & hay: The July index, at 302, is up 12 percent from last month and 15 percent above a year ago. The corn price, at $7.36 per bushel, is up 99 cents from last month and is $1.03 above July 2011. The all hay price, at $184 per ton, is up $1.00 from June and up $14.00 from last July. Sorghum grain, at $12.00 per cwt, is $2.44 above June and up $1.60 from July last year.
 
Cotton, Upland: The July index, at 126, is down 1.6 percent from June and 7.4 percent below last year. The July price, at 76.6 cents per pound, is down 0.7 cent from the previous month and 5.9 cents below last July.
 
Oilseeds: The July index, at 278, is up 12 percent from June and 17 percent higher than July 2011. The soybean price, at $15.60 per bushel, increased $1.70 from June and is $2.40 above July 2011.
 
Fruits & nuts: The July index, at 156, is down 14 percent from June and 16 percent lower than a year ago. The price decreases for peaches and oranges more than offset the price increases for pears and apples.
 
Commercial vegetables: The July index, at 150, is down 6.2 percent from last month and 8.0 percent below July 2011. Price declines for tomatoes, broccoli, and lettuce more than offset price increases during July for snap beans, onions, and celery.
 
Potatoes & dry beans: The July index, at 179, is down 0.6 percent from last month and 23 percent below July 2011. The all potato price, at $9.76 per cwt, is down 17 cents from June and $4.43 lower than last July. The all dry bean price, at $43.80 per cwt, is down 40 cents from the previous month but $9.60 higher than July 2011.
 
Livestock and products: The July index, at 151, is 0.7 percent below last month and down 2.6 percent from July 2011. Compared with a year ago, prices are higher for cattle, broilers, eggs, hogs, turkeys, and calves. The price for milk is lower than last year.
 
Meat animals: The July index, at 158, is down 2.5 percent from last month but 3.9 percent higher than last year. The July hog price, at $73.80 per cwt, is up $3.60 from June and $2.10 higher than a year ago. The July beef cattle price of $116 per cwt is down $5.00 from last month but $5.00 higher than July 2011.
 
Dairy products: The July index, at 127, is up 2.4 percent from a month ago but 24 percent lower than July last year. The July all milk price of $16.60 per cwt is up 40 cents from last month but down $5.20 from July 2011.
 
Poultry & eggs: The July index, at 159, is down 1.9 percent from June but 6.0 percent above a year ago. The July market egg price, at 76.3 cents per dozen, increased 7.5 cents from June and is 7.9 cents above July 2011. The July broiler price, at 49.0 cents per pound, is down 2.0 cents from June but 2.0 cents above a year ago. The July turkey price, at 72.4 cents per pound, is down 1.5 cents from the previous month but up 4.9 cents from a year earlier.


 
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 26 27 [28]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

< >

Privacy Policy
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.3 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!