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mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2008, 06:08:12 AM »
Price Rises Spark Ideas for Return to Tradition
CHINA - Liu Yonghao, who started out selling pig feed and later became one of the mainland's richest, sees recent pork price hikes as a call to go back to his old business.


The price of pork is now 60 percent higher from the same time last year, according to official figures. The price rises since last May have been mainly attributed to a decrease in supply and rising feed costs.

However, key producers believe there is a fundamental cause behind escalating prices.

Liu Yonghao, who started his business in the 1980s selling pig feed. He has become one of the mainland's richest people working in the mainland industry and says that recent pork price hikes are a call to go back to his old business. He says that individual farming households are quitting pig rearing, but large, pork production enterprises are not picking up the short fall, they are not expanding enough to maintain numbers and so supply cannot meet demand.
 
Liu Yonghao

"As the largest consumer and producer of agricultural products, China needs a bunch of large agricultural companies," said Liu.

His company, New Hope Group has interest that range from high-tech to chemicals. It is well on the way to become one of the first and biggest of these agricultural conglomerate.

From 2005, through a series of mergers and acquisitions, Liu - a Sichuan native - now controls nearly 10 leading agricultural companies in various regions, including Kinghey, the pork supplier for the Beijing Olympic Games.

Liu is trying to build the whole supply chain of agricultural products from animal feed and pig and poultry raising to meat processing.

Liu and his three brothers were among the earliest and most famous private entrepreneurs back in the 1980s. After raising chicken and quail, they turned to making pig feed as pork production boomed.

The Liu brothers then became the largest animal feed makers in the country, with a market share of nearly 10 percent at the peak.






mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2008, 06:11:06 AM »
Ministerial Inquiry Into Free Range Pork
AUSTRALIA - A Ministerial inquiry has been launched inot the rearing procedures used that constitute genuine free-range pork.


The inquiry follows a recent Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) report condoning the practice, by some intensive pork farmers, of marketing pork as free range when the pig had lived outdoors for less than the first four weeks of its life.

The ACCC report cited consumer confusion over the difference between "free range" and "free range bred" as the reason for the inquiry.

The inquiry, instigated by Sydney Mayor, Clover Moore (an avowed animal rights activist), follows a campaign by the Free Range Pork Farmers Association, a small group of free range pork farmers who have established a charter and certification for best practice free range pork rearing.

FRPFA spokesperson and free range pork farmer, Lee McCosker, said the vast majority of consumers the association surveyed were astounded that there was no standard definition for free range pork. "They automatically assume it's regulated, like organic certification," McCosker said.




mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2008, 09:01:03 AM »
Wednesday, April 09, 2008Print This Page
African Farmers Missing Out on Global 'Livestock Revolution'
AFRICA - African farmers are missing out on a global boom in demand for meat products because of out-of-date international regulations.



New research suggests practical options to unlock the potential of the southern African livestock industry and help millions lift themselves out of poverty through trade.

These new “win-win” options for livestock standards and market access would allow farmers to export safe, high quality products to lucrative international markets without increasing the risk of spreading animal disease, such as foot-and mouth.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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"If the full benefits of the 'livestock revolution' are to be captured in southern Africa, new responses and capacities must be developed and inappropriate and out-dated policies must be abandoned." 
Professor Ian Scoones of the Institute of Development Studies.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

The African Union is among the top level bodies preparing to make crucial decisions about the livestock sector. But practical options that respond to dynamic change in the global meat industry, market access requirements and disease control have been lacking, until now.

Ahmadu Babagana, Director for Rural Economy and Agriculture, African Union Commission said of the new research,

"If the global policy commitments to support Africa’s development are to become real, the international community must understand the potential of new product standards to increase market access for developing countries without increasing risks. This requires renewed commitments from governments and a review of international standard-setting policies, he said.

Potential
If this is carried out it could trigger huge potential for Africa, particularly southern Africa. It would help to attract new markets and trading partners, private investment for new production technologies and the provision of ethically produced and sourced foods to niche markets. The African Union, says it would  rethink of policies towards livestock production, disease management and control and trade as central to such efforts.

Over the past 18 months, studies in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe have investigated the economic, social and political trade-offs of different scenarios for gaining market access and controlling livestock disease. The research recommends a range of options that can be mixed and matched to support the beef industry, instead of a one-size-fits-all solution for every country.

Options for market access include: trade with the European Union; direct exports to large retailers; export to emerging markets, particularly Asia; regional trade in southern Africa and domestic urban and rural markets. They can be combined with practical disease control options and a more integrated and coordinated approach at regional level.

For example, current European-led 'zero-tolerance' standards insist on disease-free regions, but are too costly and impractical for poor farmers to put in place. Instead, the new research advocates options based on the safety, quality and processing of meat products. Milk, butter, cheese and deboned beef can be traded safely if processing methods are effectively regulated instead of the country’s disease status.

Over-reliance on old colonial trading networks means rapidly growing new markets are being ignored. Demand for meat products is soaring, particularly in China where annual consumption of meat has risen from an average of 20kg/person to 50kg/person since 1985. While global meat and milk production set to double by 2050, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.
Massive Growth
But massive growth in industrialised production from Brazil and China (for meat) and India (for milk), coupled with Latin America’s superior regional co-ordination and market intelligence, is far outweighing anything Africa can offer: African countries contribute just two per cent of global trade in livestock products. Each year Africa imports US$2.2billion more livestock products than it exports, and this deficit is increasing.

This new research advocates a more joined-up approach, linking regional and governmental support to private sector initiatives. Africa has been poor at negotiating trade standards with international bodies such as the World Animal Health Organisation (OIE), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and European Union. A proper place at the table is needed, and needed now.

Unless changes are urgently made, southern Africa risks missing out on the opportunity to benefit from the global 'livestock revolution' and farmers will lose the chance to trade their way out of poverty.

"A major policy rethink is needed. If the full benefits of the 'livestock revolution' are to be captured in southern Africa, new responses and capacities must be developed and inappropriate and out-dated policies must be abandoned," said research co-ordinator Professor Ian Scoones of the Institute of Development Studies, UK.

mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2008, 09:06:34 AM »
Local pork industry is dying says NSW Farmers
9/04/2008 6:29:00 PM
The NSW Farmers Association has endorsed claims made earlier this week that the Federal Government must act now to save the local pork industry.
It says the latest Productivity Commission's findings on the industry that high grain prices rather than increased imports were the key cause of lower profitability for local producers ignored the seriousness of the situation facing growers.

NSW Farmers' newly-elected pork committee chairman, Malcolm Gett, Narrabri, says pork producers in NSW are disappointed with what they believe are flawed findings in the final report from the Productivity Commission's (PC) Safeguards Inquiry into the Import of Pigmeat.

"We would suggest the Federal Government needs to ignore the PC findings, which indicate that despite record high levels of imports and the lowest pig prices in five years, increased imports have not caused and are not threatening to cause serious injury to the domestic industry," Mr Gett says.

"The PC suggests that any safeguard action against imports of pigmeat is not warranted.

"But Australian pork producers are baffled that the PC has chosen not to see the link between the record levels of pigmeat imports and the worst producer profitability crisis in living memory.

"The simple fact is the local pork industry is dying and that's a tragedy for Australia but one the Federal Government can take action on," Mr Gett says.

He says imports have increased by 40pc in the past year.

"This is costing the local pigmeat industry $2.59 million a week, with domestic processed pork production dropping 26pc last financial year.

"Almost 70pc of the bacon and ham sitting on the shelves of Australia's retailers, which comes from overseas, benefits from huge foreign subsidies on agriculture.

"How anybody can consider that imports are not causing injury to our industry is beyond me," Mr Gett says.

SOURCE: The Land, NSW



mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2008, 09:12:13 AM »
Pig pain caused by high feed grain prices, not imports
4/04/2008 3:20:00 PM
High feed costs, not rising imports, are the key reason for the present lack of profitability in the Australian pork industry.
That was the major conclusion of the Productivity Commission's second and final report from its Safeguards Inquiry into the Import of Pigmeat which was released today.

The inquiry was ordered after a slump in domestic pig prices in the second half of last year. Local growers have been seeking to penalise or restrict imports of uncooked frozen and cooked pigmeat (which, according to the commission, are used by smallgoods manufacturers mainly for ham and bacon) for more than a decade.

They believe the imports are subsidised and also have exposed the local industry to unwanted exotic diseases.

But the Productivity Commission says higher feed costs - which have added about 70 to 80 cents a kilogram to production costs since early 2006 - are the major cause of financial pain to local producers. It therefore rejected the need for import safeguard protection (eg, tariffs) for local producers.

The commission said import competition (which began in 1990) was now a fact of life for the local industry.



mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2008, 09:16:26 AM »
Pig pain caused by high feed grain prices, not imports
4/04/2008 3:20:00 PM
High feed costs, not rising imports, are the key reason for the present lack of profitability in the Australian pork industry.
That was the major conclusion of the Productivity Commission's second and final report from its Safeguards Inquiry into the Import of Pigmeat which was released today.

The inquiry was ordered after a slump in domestic pig prices in the second half of last year. Local growers have been seeking to penalise or restrict imports of uncooked frozen and cooked pigmeat (which, according to the commission, are used by smallgoods manufacturers mainly for ham and bacon) for more than a decade.

They believe the imports are subsidised and also have exposed the local industry to unwanted exotic diseases.

But the Productivity Commission says higher feed costs - which have added about 70 to 80 cents a kilogram to production costs since early 2006 - are the major cause of financial pain to local producers. It therefore rejected the need for import safeguard protection (eg, tariffs) for local producers.

The commission said import competition (which began in 1990) was now a fact of life for the local industry.




mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2008, 09:18:18 AM »
Imports to force exodus from pig industry
PAULA THOMPSON
30/01/2008 2:10:52 PM
About 27pc of the nation's pig producers have indicated they are planning to exit the industry if market conditions do not improve, according to a report released by Australia Pork Limited (APL).
In early January, APL voiced its disappointment on the results of a preliminary Federal Government Productivity Commission report, which found there was no clear evidence that increased imports seriously threatened the domestic industry.

This is in stark contrast to a subsequent report by APL that says:

• There is an alarming contraction, with 14,000 sows already culled and a second wave in progress - 24pc (73,000 sows) will be culled by June next year.

• At end of November, 14pc of producers had exited the industry and 27pc indicated they were planning to exit should market conditions not improve.

• The pork industry's facilities have limited or no alternative uses.

Pig production and slaughtering and boning rooms have considerable sunk costs, being highly capital intensive and volume dependent.

This differentiates the pork industry from many other agricultural industries.

• With the lack of positive cash\flows, strategies and investments to reduce costs of production and/or increase productivity are likely to be abandoned, catapulting the industry into a downward spiral.

• The costs of production are largely of a fixed nature.

Together with the low value of land tied up in pig production and slaughtering and boning rooms (with most facilities located away from urban areas due to environmental regulations), this means costs associated with exiting the industry are high.

South Australian Farmers' Federation pork committee chairman, Butch Moses says he is not surprised by the figures contained in APL's report on the industry.

"This downturn has long-term ramifications," he said.

"There's quite a lot of people on the way out now and that's creating a problem because there's a lot more pigs on the market than can be used domestically. "This is keeping prices low."

Mr Moses said in the long-term the number of pigs going out of the system could create problems with the export market.

"It could make it hard to maintain the fresh pork market," he said.

"With domestic use plus the export market, it could jeopardise the export market because we just won't have the numbers to sustain it."

Mr Moses said some producers would find it hard to leave the industry because of debt and investment in their piggery's infrastructure

"There will be some producers who stick it out and try to get through the next six months," he said. Hopefully they can look forward to brighter returns," he said.

SOURCE: Stock Journal, SA




mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2008, 07:35:26 AM »
Tuesday, April 15, 2008Print This Page
Wheat Plant Breathes New Life into Livestock
MANCHESTER, UK - The opening of Cargill's redeveloped Manchester wheat processing plant will provide benefits for the livestock and dairy sectors as well as arable farmers, the chairman of the NFU's combinable crops board said today.



The plant, which has had £75 million spent on it, will now take 750,000 tonnes of UK grown wheat rather than imported French maize and will produce a range of products for the food, feed and pharmaceutical sectors.

Ian Backhouse, NFU combinable crops board chairman, said: "As well as being good news for the wheat farmers who will supply it, Cargill's redevelopment of its Manchester plant will also have benefits for both livestock and dairy farmers, who will be able to take advantage of the Trafford Gold animal feed the site will produce. This kind of commitment is excellent news for the UK agriculture industry."





mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2008, 07:40:40 AM »
Tuesday, April 15, 2008Print This Page
New World Beating Boar Goes to War on Feed Costs
UK - A new boar bred by UK's pig genetics company JSR Genetics, is consistently achieving a record breaking reduction in feed conversion rates (FCR) - 13.4 per cent less than the UK average - and the lowest achieved by any pig, anywhere in the world.

 

Dubbed 'the world's most efficient pig' the new JSR Geneconverter 700 will be launched at next month's Industry shop-window the British Pig & Poultry Fair. It brings to fruition years of research and development by the company's geneticists.




Dr Grant Walling, Director of Research and Genetics, says that the potential benefit of the FCR performance of this boar line, compared with the national average, means that the Geneconverter 700 could offer savings of £5 per pig produced*.

This is what the 13.4 per cent reduction in FCR equates to a based on BPEX figures and it's supported by JSR's commercial trials currently taking place throughout the UK. They have also returned consistently outstanding figures, which in the current economic climate are proving very valuable.

With feed prices having risen so steeply, feed conversion is now key to maintaining profitability, and the JSR Geneconverter 700 is better than any other pig for delivering value, says Dr Walling.

Real Commercial Significance
"With feed accounting for approximately 65 per cent of production costs, this boar is going to make a significant difference to producers' profitability," he adds.

Table 1: JSR Geneconverter 700 trials incorporating recent inflated feed prices
  Average UK herd* GC700 Benefit to GC700
FCR Wean-Slaughter 2.54 2.20 -0.37
Days to Slaughter 172 147 -25 days
Margin over feed £23.40 £28.42 £5.20
COP p/kg dead 125.2p/kg 118.1p/kg -7.1p/kg
Financial benefit per 100 sows     £9922.66
*Based on 50% increase in feed costs from Pig Yearbook 2007 published by BPEX 

"The JSR Geneconverter 700 really does offer some good news for pig producers at a time when there's not too much of it about. We're extremely proud to add such a notable and purposeful new line to the JSR stable and think it's well worth celebrating."

And Carlos Peralta, JSR's Commercial Director agrees, He says results such as these are always gratifying.

"The Geneconverter 700 combines the very best of the JSR and Newsham genetic lines. Its remarkable FCR is just one excellent quality; apart from its outstanding growth performance, the JSR Geneconverter 700 is robustly healthy with strong legs and an extremely high libido," he explains.

CT scans underline the genotype's performance benefits in terms of carcase quality and conformation. JSR says that with continued feed price instability, the Geneconverter 700 will have an important part to play in the future profitability of pig production units in the UK and the rest of the world.

Table 2: CT Scan Results:
  GC700 Average (All Breeds)
Muscle % 41.30 40.4
Fat % 8.55 9.92
Loin % 9.75 9.46
Source: JSR Research and SAC, Edinburgh 

Further information and technical data on the Geneconverter 700 will be available from JSR throughout the British Pig and Poultry Fair - Stand 105, in Hall 2. The company is also hosting a free to enter prize draw to win 25 doses of Geneconverter semen per week, supplied for 6 months.


mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2008, 10:20:14 AM »
Friday, April 18, 2008Print This Page
Concern Mounts over Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria
EU - The use of antimicrobial agents in animals, plants and food production contributes to a growing, diverse range of resistant bacteria and of bacteria-borne resistant genes that can be passed on to humans through food, according to the European Food Safety Authority’s BIOHAZ Panel.



EFSA asked its BIOHAZ Panel to identify, from a public health perspective, the extent of how food serves as a vehicle for antimicrobial resistance.

Now, the BIOHAZ Panel has launched a public consultation on this opinion and a call for additional scientific data both with a deadline of 27 May, 2008.

The draft opinion says that general principles applied to the prevention and control of the transmission of harmful bacteria to humans through food, including the sustained practice of improved hygiene at all stages of the food chain, will contribute to the prevention and control of the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria by this route.

"Overall, control of all the routes by which antimicrobial resistant bacteria and their related genes can arise in the human patient, of which food is but one such route, requires a response from all stakeholders who acknowledge their responsibilities for preventing both the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, each in their own area of activity including medicine, veterinary medicine, primary food animal production, food processing and food preparation, as well as in the regulation of food safety," the Panel recommended in the draft opinion.

Antimicrobial resistance of bacteria is a growing concern as antimicrobials become less effective in fighting human infections. This coincides with a rise in bacterial resistance to antimicrobials in animal populations. Resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter involved in human disease are mostly spread through food. The principal foods carrying such antimicrobial resistant bacteria are poultry meat, eggs, pork or beef. Contamination during preparation, handling and processing of fresh food of plant origin, such as salads, is also of concern.

The Panel identified several instances in which food may become a vehicle for transmitting bacteria with antimicrobial resistance, to humans:

transfer of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria directly to humans from contaminated food originating from animals carrying resistant bacteria, which can colonise or infect a human being after ingestion;
ingestion of antimicrobial resistant bacteria on fresh produce from land recently irrigated with water contaminated by farm slurry or municipal sewage containing such bacteria;
transfer of antimicrobial resistance to the natural flora of the human gut from resistant bacteria on ingested food of both animal and non-animal origin, contaminated during the handling and preparation process.
The Panel recommended that these potential contamination routes and the control measures currently in place be reviewed in light of the most recent scientific data.

The Panel also said that bacteria deliberately introduced into the food and feed chain for manufacturing and preservation processes, such as fermentation cultures, and also probiotics, have on occasion exhibited antimicrobial resistance and should also be considered as a possible route for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance through food.

The Panel considered that animal-derived food products can be a potential route for the human infection Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)[4] and may be an emerging food-related risk. The Panel said however, that the data currently available pointed to a more immediate occupational risk for pig farmers and abattoir workers, in addition to that posed for hospitalised patients.

The consultation process on the draft opinion will be concluded by 27 May.




mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2008, 10:22:50 AM »
Friday, April 18, 2008Print This Page
Exports Warrant Development, Says Producers
CHINA - Domestic pig producers are alling for for the government to help them develop more export opportunities for pigs and/or pork products to mainland China to secure viable operations.



Pan Lien-chou, chairman of the ROC Swine Association, said that aside from talks on cross-strait direct flights and entry of Chinese tourists, the new government can negotiate with Chinese authorities on exports of pork products to mainland China, as well as imports of corn and soybean powder from the other side of the Taiwan Strait. President-elect Ma Ying-jeou's new government will take office on May 20

Pan said the hog price in China averages at NT$8,200 per 100 kilograms, some NT$1,800-1,900 higher than the average price of NT$6,300-6,400 in Taiwan. In addition, the hog price in China will keep trending upward due mainly to strong market demand there.

By contrast, the auction prices offered in many local counties and cities range from NT$6,300-NT$6,300 per 100 kilograms, better than before. But the production cost has risen to NT$6,500 per 100 kilograms as a result of the rising import cost for corn feed.

Losses
As a result, farmers will suffer losses for every hog sold in Taiwan, Pan said. "If local hogs can be sold to mainland China, local farmers can secure stable profits to cover their losses seen over the past few years," Pan continued. Accordingly, Pan stressed, the new government should place Taiwan's hog exports to China on the agenda of cross-strait talks on economic and trade exchanges, to help local hog farmers secure viable operations.

Meanwhile, Yang Ho-bei, chairman of the Taiwan Livestock Industry Development Association, said that mainland China is an exporter of corn products, and therefore the government here should liberalize corn imports from China to help reduce the production cost of domestic hog farmers.

On another front, Yang said, Taiwan can export 50,000 hogs to mainland China per month. This, in turn, is expected to help stabilize domestic hog prices or pork products.
Ready for Quality
Also yesterday, Chen Li-ling, a division chief of the agricultural development department under the Taoyuan County Government, said the county is ready to export high-quality hog or pork products to mainland China. She suggested the Council of Agriculture take charge of the affairs.

But COA officials said since the exposure of the food-and-mouth disease (FMD)in Taiwan some 11 years ago, exports of hogs or pork products should be subject to strict inspections required by the governments of export destinations.

According to the National Animal Industry Foundation, Taiwan has resumed small-scale pork exports, shipping some 1,000 metric tons to Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore and mainland China in the first three months of the year. Of them, 400 metric tons were exported to China, which are then processed and exported to Japan.

mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2008, 10:34:59 AM »
Thursday, April 17, 2008Print This Page
Plight of Pig Industry Highlighted
UK - Threats to the British pig industry from rocketing feed costs and almost static prices are likely to continue says an independent report just published.

 
The report predicts production costs could be as high as 180p per kg by 2010, compared with around 140p at present an average of 108p in 2006

'Global feed commodities market, its impact on the British pig industry, and risk management strategies to mitigate this' has been commissioned by BPEX Ltd with independent contributions from ABN and Barclays.

Feed accounts for almost half the price of producing a pig, and the rising price of feed commodities has caused pig production costs to soar.
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"The report illustrates how the British pig industry remains under threat - without a price of 140p per kilogram pig producers will continue to suffer unsustainable losses." 
Stuart Houston, BPEX Chairman
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Independent analysis by ABN on current and future commodity price trends shows that the cost of producing a kilogram of pig meat is forecast to rise from 108.2p in 2006 (on an annualised basis) in to 148.1p March 2008. And, assuming an average producer price of 115p in 2008, this implies a loss of 30p/kg, which is equivalent to £22 on every pig produced - equivalent to an industry-wide annual loss of £200 million.

Barclays' independent analysis highlights how supply chain collaboration such as fixed price contracts, or sales contracts linked to commodity prices, may help ease the risk faced by pig producers.

BPEX Chairman Stewart Houston said: "The report illustrates how the British pig industry remains under threat - without a price of 140p per kilogram pig producers will continue to suffer unsustainable losses. This will see British pig producers leaving the industry for good.

"The British pig industry is unique, producing pork, bacon and ham to standards of animal welfare which are not regularly matched outside Britain. The loss of the British pig herd will mean consumers lose the choice to buy pork, bacon and ham from a high welfare, assured supply chain, that deploys sustainable production methods"

 

mikey

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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2008, 07:45:56 AM »
Wednesday, April 16, 2008Print This Page
Cherkizovo Doubles Income
RUSSIA - Russian integrated pig and poultry meat producer Cherkizovo has seen its net income more than double over the last year.



The company's income rose by 109 per cent to US $61.6 million compared to US $29.4 million in 2006.
Adjusted EBITDA increased by 56 per cent year-on-year to US $115.3 million compared to US $74.2 million the previous year.
Group gross profit rose by 51 per cent to US $223.8 million compared to US $147.8 million.
Gross margins increased to 27 per cent in 2007 from 23 per cent in 2006.
Sales increased by 33 per cent to US $840.8 million compared to US $631.6 million the previous year.
Cherkizovo acquired OJSC Kurinoe Tsarstvo at the end of August last year and with the acquisition the company is now the largest producer of poultry products in Russia.

Last year the company also opened a new pig slaughtering line at the Penzensky meat and poultry plant and acquired more than 28,000 hectares of land in the "Black Earth" farming region close to our Tambov pork facilities.

Cherkizovo was granted the certificate of compliance with GOST R ISO 9001-2001 quality management system last year.
Strong
Sergey Mikhailov, Chief Executive Officer of Cherkizovo Group, said the group was delighted to report such a strong set of results for 2007.

"With sales up by 33 per cent, net income more than doubling as well as margin improvement we have continued to deliver real value for all our shareholders.

"During 2007 we have continued to take major steps towards achieving our aim of becoming Russia's leading producer of meat and meat products. The business grew in scale substantially during the last year, and we have doubled the size of both the pork and the poultry divisions.

"This was achieved through our dual track strategy of organic growth from existing and expanded operations and carefully selected acquisitions such as that of OJSC Kurinoe Tsarstvo that compliment our existing business. We are also pleased with the attractive scale achieved by the company as demonstrated by our pro forma sales in 2007 of US $933.7 million.

"Overall we have meaningfully expanded our business, through new state-of-the-art facilities, increased operational efficiency, and, at the same time, delivered excellent financial performance and increasing margins despite an environment of increasing grain prices. We look forward to 2008 with confidence."
 


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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2008, 07:51:17 AM »
Feed costs hit Spanish pig producers
// 16 apr 2008

Spanish pig producers are struggling with rising feedcosts, according to Spanish pig industry association Anprogapor. The association estimates that 15% of the 70,000 pig producers in Spain have ceased production.

 
Production costs in Spain are around €1.20 per kilo of delivered weight, while market prices half-way through 2007 were around €0.90.

Anprogapor has stated that around 200,000 sows were taken out of production to reduce the number of piglets. This action resulted in an increase in market prices, but not high enough to generate more profit.

The problems have been caused through drought, which the Spanish have been struggling with for the last four years. Provincial governments have been calling for more water from elsewhere, for example, from their neighbours, France.


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Re: World Hog news:
« Reply #29 on: April 20, 2008, 07:57:39 AM »
High feed costs hit Aussie pig producers
// 04 apr 2008

Australian pigmeat producers are suffering badly because of high domestic feed costs, the Productivity Commission has found. The commission's final report into the pigmeat industry found feed prices reached record highs in 2007 and the trend is continuing into this year.


Major reasons for feed price hikes have been drought, growing worldwide demand and government support for ethanol, and the strong economic growth in China and India.

While pointing out that the Cooperative Research Centre for Pork is looking into ways to reduce feed costs, the report recommended a review into ethanol and other biofuel policies and their effect on grain users.

It found federal government support for the ethanol industry, based on growing crops such as wheat and sugar, had the potential to increase feed grain costs. The commission also found there was potential, in the longer term, for domestic support for the ethanol industry to raise domestic feed prices and therefore directly affect the pigmeat and other livestock industries.

The report said reducing feed costs was crucial for Australia to be able to participate in an export market.

Among other recommendations, the commission urged governments to undertake periodic reviews of pig animal welfare regulation to ensure that it was imposing the minimum compliance requirements necessary to achieve its objectives. It urged consistency of regulation across the various jurisdictions on elements such as animal welfare, occupational health and safety, food and ethanol regulation.





 

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