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Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2012, 04:50:22 AM »

Monday, January 09, 2012

Mexican Meat Exports to Japan Double

MEXICO - Mexican meat exports to Japan nearly doubled in 2011, reaching 70,134 tonnes, compared to 38,176 tonnes in 2010, according to figures from the National Health Service, Food Safety and Food Quality (SENASA).


The increase in meat exports to Japan is down to a concerted effort from Mexican producers and companies together with the Federal Government to meet the sanitary requirements demanded by one of the world's most demanding markets.
 
With exports of more than 48,000 tonnes of pork products and byproducts, and about 20,000 tonnes of cattle in 2011 Japan became a major destination for Mexican meat.

Exports also included more than 1,000 tonnes of poultry products and 650 tonnes of horse meat.
 
The exports came from 41 federally inspected meat plants in 13 states - Aguascalientes, Baja California, Coahuila, Durango, Jalisco, Michoacan, Nuevo Leon, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Veracruz, Yucatan and Zacatecass.

Beef products shipped to Japan included both frozen and chilled cuts and offal.
 
The frozen and chilled pork products included processed products such as bacon, chilorio, roasted suckling pig and gravy.


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2012, 05:00:24 AM »

Monday, January 09, 2012
Aquaculture To Provide More Food For Filipinos

PHILIPPINES - With the world population reaching seven billion, many countries may have to rely on aquaculture and sustainable fisheries practices to ensure enough supply of food in the coming years, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (Seafdec) told the Manila Times.


Manila Times reports that Dr Joebert Toledo, chief of Seafdec’s Aquaculture Department, said that the world is now relying more and more on aquaculture rather than capture fisheries, noting that climate change has affected the migration of pelagic fish.

“This is apparent in the absence of large schools of fish in traditional fishing grounds,” he said.

Dr Toledo added that experts have also noted a shift in dietary preference for seafood, owing to health concerns. In view of this shift, he said that Seafdec has been working full blast on fine-tuning aquaculture practices best suited to expand the fish population in many areas of the Philippines.

“This is necessary to assure that there is enough food for the Filipino people, which is expected to hit the 100-million mark in no time,” Dr Toledo told Manila Times, citing that country is now importing anchovies (dilis), round scad (galunggong) and sardine (tamban).

Since 1976, Seafdec has been working on fish cage and fish pen culture, and basic research into the hatching, nutrition and diseases of fish and other marine resources helped in developing large fishponds and inland hatcheries of milkfish, grouper, snapper, sea bass and tilapia.

Earlier, the Department of Agriculture said that it alloted P1 billion from its 2012 national budget to finance an integrated community-based fisheries program to counter the threats of degradation of coastal ecosystems, climate change and globalisation.

The fund shall partly be used to maintain 62 mariculture parks and nine regional and municipal fishports in the country, and for the provision of training and technical assistance to various areas in aquaculture, municipal, commercial, post-harvest, and regulatory bodies in support of the fishery industry.


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2012, 03:42:52 AM »

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Seoul Seeks to Start Exporting Beef

SOUTH KOREA - South Korea will seek to begin exporting beef within a few years as part of its efforts to help stabilise prices, the agriculture minister said Tuesday.

"Considering wagyu (Japanese beef) is 1.5 times more expensive than Korean beef but that Japan still exports beef, I believe we, too, can export Korean beef," Suh Kyu-yong, the minister of food, agriculture, forestry and fisheries, told a press briefing, reports YonhapNewsAgency.
 

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2012, 03:44:03 AM »

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

LMC: 4% Decline In Cattle Kill Confirmed For 2011

NORTHERN IRELAND, UK - Last year was a remarkable year for deadweight cattle prices, according to the Livestock and Meat Commission of Northern Ireland.




In Northern Ireland, prime cattle prices were generally 14 per cent higher than 2010 levels throughout 2011 and to a large extent the strong prices were driven by the tight supply situation throughout Ireland.

 Table 1 below shows how the cattle kill in Northern Ireland was significantly lower in 2011 compared to 2010 levels. Over the course of the year the total prime cattle kill was six per cent lower than 2010 levels. However, with a 14 per cent increase in the cull cow kill, the impact on throughput at the factories in 2011 was softened to a certain extent with the overall kill down by four per cent.
 
2011 was bookended by a very large cattle kill in both January and December. Last January, the kill was significantly higher than previous year levels, while in December the general trend of tight availability throughout 2011 was broken with a four per cent increase in the prime cattle kill (a reflection of the big freeze in December 2010). With heavier carcase weights also, overall prime beef production was six per cent higher than December 2010 levels. With the cow kill up by 24 per cent year-on-year, the overall kill was up by seven per cent in December.
 
The stronger kill in December meant that the overall decline in slaughterings in 2011 was not just as steep as it may have been otherwise. By the end of 2011, the steer kill was down by two per cent compared to 2010 levels. However, the young bull / calf kill was down by 17 per cent on 2010 levels, meaning that the overall male prime cattle kill was down by seven per cent. This reflected the reduced number of cattle on the ground over the course of last year.
 
The mature bull kill was down (-34 per cent) sharply also. It is important to note that this does not represent a liquidation of the breeding bull kill and rather is a reflection of the reduced number of male beef cattle being kept entire and fed beyond 24 months (the age at which a young bull is deemed to become a mature bull).
 
The five per cent decline in the heifer kill also reflected this lower number of cattle on the ground. The reduced heifer kill also corresponded with increased retentions of heifers in 2011 for breeding. This would have reduced the number available for slaughter.
 
With more heifers retained for breeding and strong cull cow prices, there was a significant 14 per cent increase in the number of cows slaughtered in 2011 compared to 2010. This was driven mainly by an increase in the beef cow kill.

Lamb kill down by 13 per cent

 In 2011, the lamb kill was significantly lower than 2010 levels. By the end of September, the kill for the year to date was running at 25 per cent lower than 2010 levels. However, with a substantial uplift in the kill in the final quarter, the overall kill for 2011 was just 13 per cent lower than 2010 levels.
 
In December the NI lamb kill was 50 per cent (10,000 head) higher than 2010 levels. This is a substantial increase and reflects a trend which was ongoing throughout the entirety of the final quarter of 2011. It does not appear that this increase has been at the expense of exports to ROI and it remains to be seen whether throughput in early 2012 will be tighter as a result of this increased kill in late 2011.



Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2012, 03:45:08 AM »

Tuesday, January 10, 2012
 
Australian Lamb Exports Jump Three Per Cent

AUSTRALIA - Australian lamb exports reported a three per cent increase during 2011, compared with 2010, to 160,007 tonnes swt (Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry) - the third largest calendar year total on record (behind 2009 and 2007), according to Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA).




 

MLA reports that the increase for 2011 occurred despite a fall in lamb production over the same period, as strong overseas demand, with tight global supplies (particularly out of New Zealand – NZ) attracted a higher proportion of Australian lamb.
 
The largest export market for Australian lamb in 2011 was the Middle East, despite a five per cent decline year-on-year, to 34,987 tonnes swt. The Middle East just pipped the US, which saw a one per cent increase, to 34,334 tonnes swt. It should be noted however, that the US was the highest value export market for 2011, with a larger proportion of higher end chilled cuts than the Middle East.
 
Greater China experienced significant growth during 2011, with Australian lamb exports up 15 per cent year-on-year, to 29,620 tonnes swt. This is a region identified by both Australia and NZ as a key growth market for lamb (and mutton), and with disruptions to NZ supplies during late 2010 and 2011, Australian lamb filled the demand in Greater China.
 
MLA states a similar pattern occurred with the EU, to which Australian lamb exports lifted eight per cent year-on-year, to 12,356 tonnes swt. The limitation on exporting lamb to this market, set by a tariff rate quota (of 18,786 tonnes carcase weight equivalent – cwe)), remains an issue for Australian exporters, particularly when compared with the NZ quota of 227,854 tonnes cwe.
 
Of the smaller markets, Australian lamb exports grew 12 per cent year-on-year to Papua New Guinea, to 10,212 tonnes swt, and four per cent to South East Asia, to 9,585 tonnes swt while shipments to Japan fell four per cent, to 7,381 tonnes swt.
 

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 03:46:10 AM »


Australian Beef Exports Finish 2011 Higher

AUSTRALIA - Despite 2011 being a year marked by unprecedented events in key beef export markets, Australia’s beef and veal shipments increased by three per cent for the year, totalling 949,195 tonnes swt (Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF)), reports Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA).




 

MLA reports that, surpassing the 922,833 tonnes swt registered for the full 2010 calendar year, and falling just short of shipments in 2006 and 2008, Australia’s beef and veal shipments finished the year at a rapid pace. November’s shipments were the highest in three years, while the year concluded with a record December volume of 82,054 tonnes swt.
 
For Australian beef exports in 2011 to have exceeded 2010 levels by three per cent reflected the very strong underlying global demand for Australian beef, considering the issues faced for exporters throughout the year. An A$ averaging 103US¢, and hitting 110US¢ twice throughout the year, created a significant headwind for Australian exporters, while the ongoing global economic turmoil created demand concerns in many advanced beef markets.
 
For Australia’s largest beef export market, Japan, the natural disasters in March devastated the economy, impacting demand for Australian beef for the remainder of the year. For 2011, Australia’s beef exports to Japan totalled 342,189 tonnes swt – down four per cent on the previous year. Additionally, Australian product faced increased competition from US beef in the Japanese market, as the strong A$ contrasted with the very weak US currency. However, despite all of these issues, Japan remains Australia’s largest beef export market by a large distance, taking 36 per cent of all beef exports for the year, and more than double the next largest market (the US).
 
Australian beef and veal exports to the US in 2011 totalled 167,820 tonnes swt – down nine per cent on the previous year and the lowest calendar year volume for several decades. In contrast, the Korean market expanded again in 2011, rising 18 per cent on 2010, to 146,347 tonnes swt – falling just short of the record 149,663 tonnes swt shipped in 2006.
 
MLA states that undoubtedly, the stars of the 2011 export year were the smaller, non-traditional markets, which offset (or even contributed to) the lower volumes to Japan and the US. Russia, the Middle East and South East Asia were the main contributors to the increase in total exports for the year, with rises also witnessed to more traditional markets of the EU and Canada.
 
Traditionally dominated by the big two markets of Japan and the US, Australian beef exports to all “other” markets (including Korea) increased 15 per cent year-on-year, offsetting a six per cent decline to Japan and the US combined.
 

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2012, 03:47:18 AM »

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Packed Agenda for World Meat Congress

FRANCE - The role of the meat industry as it affects the environment, animal welfare and human health are three of the main themes for the World Meat Congress in Paris in June.


The congress which will take place at the Palais de Congrès will open with a discussion on the global protein market, including fish, and will also see presentations on agricultural commodity price structures and consumer behaviour.
 
The congress' discussion on the impact the meat industry has on the environment will see presentations from Stewart Ledgard from AgResearch Limited, Theun Vellinga from Waginengen Livestock Research and Jean-Baptists Dolle from the Insitut de l'élevage. The discussions will look at reducing negative impacts on the environment and also the positive impacts that livestock farming can have.
 
Among the speakers on animal welfare issues in the global meat industry will be Cheryl McCrindle from the University of Pretoria, Jos Goebbels the president of the Centrale Organisatie voor de Vleessector and consultant Charlie Stenholm.
 
Concerns over the meat sector and human health will be addressed by Dominik Alexander the senior managing epidemiologist with Exponent Inc Health Sciences and Stuart Phillips from McMaster University.
 
The congress will also take a look at related markets and agriculture policy, with a view of the 5th quarter markets and exotic meats.
 
The congress will also discuss concerns over sanitary and tariff barriers to trade.
 
The World Meat Congress takes place in Paris from 5-6 June,

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2012, 03:50:49 AM »
Turkey Production in the EU

European production of turkeys remains rather stable at 1.8 million tons since the crisis of avian influenza in 2006, according to AVEC, the Association of Poultry Processors and Poultry Trade in the EU Countries, in its annual report for 2011.
 



However, the picture is different across countries: production growth is mainly recorded in Germany and Poland, while France, Italy and the United Kingdom are struggling to stabilise production levels.

The sharp price increase of agricultural raw materials is taking place in a difficult economic situation. In addition, higher feed conversion rates prevail. The turkey industry must prioritise the reduction in cost price.

Production costs are volatile. Volatility of consumption patterns are difficult to manage. Even apart from food scares, the consumer today is very price-sensitive. Increases in retail prices make consumers reconsider their purchasing decisions. Given the price position of turkey meat, it should, however, be possible to maintain its current level of consumption.

Imports from third countries is a real challenge to the EU production because they impact the balance of the market. These imports are playing an important role in the supply of the processing industries. This demonstrates that the European turkey industry is burdened by the requirements of European regulation on the protection of the environment and animal welfare. These additional costs cannot be recovered by the European producers and have not been incorporated by imported products.

Reduction in Prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium
 
Regulation (EC) 584/2008 of 20 June 2008 establishes the Community objective of reducing the prevalence of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium in turkeys. The maximum percentage of meat turkey flocks positive with respect to these two serotypes must be reduced to less than or equal to one per cent by 31 December 2012.

The European industry has evidence for prevalence rates today. The European Commission has nevertheless decided to establish the absence of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium in 25g of turkey meat, despite the possible progress obtained during the transitional period until 31 December 2012. The tightening of the regulations comes as the EU welcomes the continued decline in the number of human cases registered and it assigns that result to the effectiveness of the global approach.

Turkey Welfare
 





Apart from the regulations on the protection of animals during transport and at the time of killing, the turkey sector is paying attention to the welfare of turkeys during rearing. Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is considered as a welfare indicator in broilers although it may be questioned whether it could be a tool for monitoring turkey welfare. The natural character of turkey production is different from chickens in that they do not turn the litter, like broilers. From literature and experience in practice, it is clear that the cause of FPD is multifactorial, including contact between foot pad and litter/ excreta, growing conditions, genetic variation and nutrition. A comprehensive study is required to the solutions to reduce the incidence and severity of FPD in turkeys for sustainable turkey production in Europe.

A consortium of research institutes and small and medium-sized enterprises and their associations have submitted a project for European funding to gain more scientific knowledge on the development and causative factors of FPD in commercial turkeys and on the relationship between FPD and health, welfare and performance.

December 2011

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2012, 10:33:14 AM »

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Non-Profit Processing Plant Opens for Business

US - An independent meat processing plant in Marion North Carolina started by McDowell Economic Development Association (MEDA) Inc. and supported by the Independent Small Animal Meat Processors Association (ISAMPA) will open for business on 15 January.


Foothills Pilot Plant (FPP) is a non-profit facility created for poultry and rabbit processing to serve independent growers seeking USDA and FDA inspection of their meat products.

The plant processes chickens, turkeys, rabbits, and other specialty fowl on a fee for service basis.

In partnership with ISAMPA, FPP also serves as a center for learning best practices for small flock production of poultry and small scale production of meat rabbits. This facility is another step towards promoting sustainable agriculture in Western North Carolina.
 
The plant is administered by MEDA board members and the Foothills Pilot Plant advisory committee, which consists of individuals with different areas of expertise.
 
Based upon a feasibility study commissioned in 2006, a plan was developed to establish this project in Marion, North Carolina, in partnership with the McDowell Economic Development Association (MEDA), McDowell County Government, independent growers, North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS), NC State University's College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) and NCA&T University. Small family farms and community leaders have supported the development of Foothills Pilot Plant to serve independent growers of poultry and rabbits.
 
Major contributors for the development of this project are: the North Carolina Golden LEAF Foundation, the North Carolina Rural Center, USDA Rural Development, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Indpependent Small Animal Meat Processors Association of Western North Carolina.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2012, 10:35:30 AM »

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Australian Lamb Prices Higher In 2011

AUSTRALIA - National average saleyard prices for lamb increased across the board during 2011, with strong rebuilding intentions and steady demand in both the Australian and overseas markets having a positive influence upon prices, reports Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA).

MLA states the greatest increase in average prices for the year was in light lambs, with tight supply a key factor, underpinned by the favourable grazing conditions. This category increased 16 per cent year-on-year in 2011, averaging 540¢/kg cwt.
 
There was also competition from restockers and feeders for lighter lambs, with this category averaging 14 per cent higher on the previous year, at 585¢/kg cwt.
 
Merino lambs, helped by the rejuvenated wool outlook, lifted 12 per cent compared with 2010, to average 493¢/kg cwt.
 
Trade and heavy lambs for processing lifted nine per cent, to 549¢/kg cwt, and eight per cent, to 529¢/kg cwt, year-on-year during 2011 – with global demand supporting the higher prices.
 
The national saleyard mutton indicator averaged 11 per cent higher in 2011, at 413¢/kg cwt. The combination of flock rebuilding, improved wool prices and tight supplies were the main drivers for the mutton price increase.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2012, 10:37:24 AM »

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Beef Prices Consistent, Sheep prices on the Move

IRELAND - Livestock Price Coordinator for the Irish Cattle and Sheep Farmers’ Association (ICSA), John Cleary, has said that while prices have not improved following the post Christmas spike, the factory trade has remained solid and prices on a par with last week.


 Mr Cleary also said that the overall outlook is quite good for at least the first eight to nine months of 2012.
 
For a good mix of steers, the base price being quoted is €4.05 – 4.10/kg, a further increase of 5c for the lower quotes from last week. Factories are quoting €4.20- €4.25/kg for heifers, this is no change from last week. For a mix of U and R grade bulls, the base price is also €4.15 - €4.20/kg, roughly the same quotes from last week Base price quotes for cows stand at €3.20-€3.65/kg, again no change from week.
 
Commenting on this week’s trade, Mr Cleary said: “Things are much better than last week. Prices are high and factories are actively looking for stock to meet their quotas so this all means that farmers are in the driving seat. Farmers, however, should not be simply settling for whatever the factory quotes them for their stock. These places are desperate for stock so those more adept at negotiating can push for higher than the quotes. The main piece of advise the ICSA could give to anyone at the minute is not to sell soft. The overall outlook is for a positive eight to nine months for 2012. The kill rate should remain below the norm for the majority of 2012 and this will mean that prices should continue strongly for the majority of the year."
 
Sheep prices are on the rise also with scarcities developing across the country. Prices for lambs up to 23.5kg are €5.25/kg, up 5c from last week. Ewes are being quoted €3.20/kg, no change from last week.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2012, 02:07:52 AM »

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Weekly US Broiler Hatchery Report

US - According to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), compared to the same week last year, six per cent fewer broiler-type eggs were set and four per cent fewer chicks were placed.
 

Broiler-type eggs set down six per cent
 
Commercial hatcheries in the 19 State weekly programme set 193 million eggs in incubators during the week ending 7 January 2012. This was down 6 per cent from the eggs set the corresponding week a year earlier.

Average hatchability for chicks hatched during the week was 85 per cent. Average hatchability is calculated by dividing chicks hatched during the week by eggs set three weeks earlier.

Broiler-type chicks placed down four per cent
 
Broiler growers in the 19 State weekly programme placed 162 million chicks for meat production during the week ending 7 January 2012. Placements were down 4 per cent from the comparable week a year earlier.

Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2012, 02:27:49 AM »
Thursday, January 12, 2012
Cargill Earnings Fall Sharply
US - International producer and marketer of food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services, Cargill, has reported an 88 per cent fall in earnings in the second quarter of the 2012 financial year.


Earnings from continuing operations to the quarter to the end of Novemebr last year were $100 million down from $832 million in the same period a year ago.

In the first six months, earnings from continuing operations were $336 million, compared with $1.53 billion in last year’s first half.

Both the year-ago figures exclude earnings from Cargill’s former majority investment in The Mosaic Company.

Consolidated revenues in the 2012 second quarter were $33.3 billion, up 17 per cent from $28.5 billion a year ago.

First-half revenues reached $67.9 billion, compared with $54.2 billion in the prior period.

“The second quarter was significantly below expectations, especially in contrast to last year when we posted our strongest quarter ever,” said Greg Page, Cargill chairman and chief executive officer.

“Our food ingredients and agriculture services businesses generated solid earnings. At the same time, our commodity-based trading and asset management businesses faced significant challenges.

"First, commodity and financial markets were driven more by political uncertainties than by underlying supply and demand fundamentals.

"Second, our performance in the sugar market was poor. Additionally, our meat businesses on a combined basis experienced one of their weakest quarters. Finally, we recognized a significant number of one-time items, including asset impairments, and acquisition and integration expenses.”

Mr Page said Cargill is actively working to reduce its costs and simplify its work processes, and he is optimistic about the company’s earnings prospects for the remainder of the fiscal year.

“Cargill has been through difficult cycles before, made changes and emerged stronger for it. We are confident that the actions we are taking to create a more agile enterprise will better position us in the current economic environment.”

Mr Page noted the fundamentals of Cargill’s business remain sound. Its diversified business model is backed by a strong balance sheet and excellent access to liquidity.

The company maintains a disciplined approach to risk management, and it continues to reinvest in assets that strengthen its ability to be a reliable supplier and innovative partner to its customers globally.

On a segment reporting basis, the food ingredients and applications segment was the largest contributor to second-quarter earnings.

The segment’s food ingredient businesses on a combined basis almost matched last year’s near record performance.

Its global group of meat businesses was well off last year’s record earnings pace. The shrinkage in US fed cattle supplies pressured margins in beef; other meat units also faced higher raw material costs.

Cargill’s recent acquisitions in food ingredients in Brazil and Europe, and in animal protein in Central America, were all accretive to earnings in the second quarter.

Earnings were solid in the agriculture services segment but lower than in the prior year, a period in which market opportunities for US grain handling and export, and for global feed ingredient merchandising, were more favorable. Costs related to the acquisition of the Provimi animal nutrition company were recorded in this segment.

Earnings in the origination and processing segment were below last year’s exceptional results, reflecting the challenges of operating in commodity markets driven more by the volatile political environment than by the underlying supply and demand fundamentals. Additionally, performance in sugar negatively affected segment results.

Results within the risk management and financial segment were mixed. Strong performance in risk management services to customers was more than offset by weaker results in asset management due to the stress in global financial markets.

The industrial segment, which makes up a small portion of Cargill earnings, was moderately below the year-ago level due in part to higher freight expenses.

Cargill completed the acquisition of Provimi, a leading global animal nutrition company, for an enterprise value of $2 billion. The merger brings together Cargill’s expertise in compound feed, supply chain and risk management with Provimi’s nutritional expertise, technology and portfolio of premix, additives and feed ingredients. Now with more than 16,000 employees in 37 countries, the combined business has the scale, reach and capabilities to deliver innovative, high-quality products and services to customers worldwide.


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2012, 03:41:43 AM »
Friday, January 13, 2012
2011 - Poor Year for Spanish Agriculture
SPAIN - 2011 was a year with more pain than glory for the Spanish livestock sector. Cuts in state aid, falls in agricultural income and increases in debt all led to the majority of livestock producers making a loss, says the Spanish Federation of Livestock Producers.


An immediate reaction to this was the drop in the number of farms.

One of the consequences of this, was an increase in unemployment. In Spain more than 700,000 people live directly off livestock production.

The group says that another serious issue is the decline in breeding herds, and pedigree breeding herds.

A dramatic rise in production costs pushed agricultural incomes down by 3.4 per cent in 2011. Fertiliser prices rose by 20 per cent, energy by 17.7 per cent, feed by 15.5 per cent and diesel by 7.3 per cent.

For farmers the main concern has been the rise in the cost of raw materials for animal feed. Concentrates for beef have risen by 18.4 per cent between September 2009 and September 2011.

On top of this, the Federation of Livestock Producers says that the government has done little to support the agricultural sector.

The proposals for the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy will seriously hurt Spanish farmers.

Beef: Margins in the beef sector have reduced dramatically, which means the sector remains in a delicate situation. An increase in meat exports and live animals has helped to balance this slightly.

Dairy: In 2011 dairy prices improved. The dairy sector welcomes the EU milk package announced at the end of 2011, which encourages milk contracts. Spanish producers have been active in campaigning for fair milk prices.

Pigs: Increased costs and problems in the supply chain marked this as a poor year for pig producers. High grain and soy prices cut into farm profitability, as feed accounts for 70 per cent of production costs.

Many farms incurred capital costs, adapting for the EU regulation banning sow stalls, which will come into play in 2013.

Poultry: High prices have benefited poultry producers and offset some of the high input costs. However new welfare implications, with the introduction of the ban on battery cages for laying hens has caused some uncertainty in the industry.


Mustang Sally Farm

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Re: The Meat Site:
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2012, 03:49:29 AM »

Friday, January 13, 2012

Mixed Start To 2012 Livestock Markets

AUSTRALIA - The first full selling week of 2012 was somewhat of a mixed bag for prices, particularly when compared to the end of 2011.While young cattle prices remained near all-time highs, prices for export categories averaged lower than the final full selling week of December (17 December). All lamb categories started the year lower, reports Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA).

MLA reports however, it must be stated that the first full week of trading can often by marked by an absence of buyers, while producers can be keen to market stock after the lack of selling opportunities over the Christmas and New Year break.
 
For 2012, both appear to be applicable, with cattle yardings up 22 per cent on the corresponding week last year, and lamb offerings jumping 15 per cent. While much of the year-on-year national increase in cattle numbers for the past week was in Queensland, it must also be remembered that yardings during the first full selling week of 2010 were extremely low, as flooding saw most sales cancelled.
 
After hitting an all-time high of 428¢/kg cwt in the final few selling days of 2011, the EYCI opened 2012 on Monday at 419.25¢/kg cwt – slipping to 412.75¢/kg cwt by Friday. Demand for young cattle remains very strong, with the results from the opening weaner sales of the year well received by most sellers.
 
Heavy steers averaged 349¢/kg cwt for the week, cheaper than the end of 2011, and equal with the corresponding week in 2010. Nationally cows averaged 307¢/kg cwt for the week, with direct to works prices at 295¢/kg cwt.
 
Lamb prices started 2012 cheaper, with prices back across all categories, albeit just barely for restocker and feeder lambs. Higher lamb offerings in NSW, Victoria and SA reportedly contributed to the lower start to the year, with the hot weather throughout early January possibly inducing increased turnoff. Nationally, trade lambs finished the week at 494¢/kg cwt, while heavy and light lambs averaged 477¢/kg cwt and 499¢/kg cwt, respectively.
 
Less impacted by the summer break, the national average for restocker and feeder lamb prices only started the year down 1¢ on the finish of 2011, averaging 542¢/kg cwt. Producers are reported to be chasing additional lambs for finishing, keen to make the most of an abundant supply of feed grain and pasture.
 
As market activity increases in coming weeks, a clearer state of play for both cattle and lamb markets should become evident.

 

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