PINOYAGRIBUSINESS

LIVESTOCKS => AGRI-NEWS => Topic started by: mikey on March 20, 2008, 08:21:17 AM

Title: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 20, 2008, 08:21:17 AM
Hog production seen rising 3.5%



Inquirer
First Posted 05:33am (Mla time) 05/25/2007


The Department of Agriculture expects hog production to grow 3.5 percent this year as meat exports to Singapore, the US, Russia, Japan and other Asian countries are likely to increase, Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said.

From 1.84 million metric tons in 2006, production is projected to reach 1.905 million metric tons this year, he said in a statement.

Aside from frozen meat, the agriculture department expects several processed meat items to start penetrating the global market this year as the Philippines moves closer to being declared totally free of foot-and-mouth disease by the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE), or Animal Health Organization.

The processed meat items include luncheon meat, pork and beans, “lechon paksiw,” pork “adobo,” “sisig,” chili con carne and “bistik tagalog.”

“Singapore is willing to accept Philippine exports of fresh frozen meat, subject to certain conditions, which are being work out,” Yap said.

He added that the Department of Agriculture was eyeing Japan, the world’s top meat importer, which imported a total of 1.32 million metric tons of meat in 2005.

He said the department would also help meat exporters break into the markets in the US, Russia, Mexico, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan and the European Union.

Yap said that every ton increase in value of hog production was equivalent to P68,750, while every ton increase in rice production, before milling, was equivalent to only P10,000.

In 2006, hog production contributed 14.26 percent of the total value of agriculture, ranking second to rice (before milling), which contributed 18 percent.

It contributed about 39 percent of the total livestock production, with gross output value pegged at P126.5 billion last year. Amy R. Remo, with INQUIRER.net
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 20, 2008, 08:27:29 AM
Good news,the Philippine Govt. has confidence in the hog business.With future plans to export to foreign countries.We now have Singapore,NEXT, take no prisoners.

Slyfox,you are with the Federation,is the Federation not a Special Interest Group.Special interest groups lobby Govt. for change and action.Is the Federation asking for more export opportunies?What is the long range plan for the Federation??
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 27, 2008, 10:21:51 AM
Philippine Pork Market 2008
By Pia Abuel-Ang, USDA FAS GAIN Report. The Minimum Access Volume (MAV) utilization for pork increased from five to 19 per cent last year, indicating an increase in importation of more premium pork cuts. In October 2007, the Philippine Department of Agriculture announced that it would be reviewing its MAV regulations, which is expected to be completed within the first quarter of 2008.

 

Tariff Rate Quota: Data from the Minimum Access Volume (MAV) Management Committee of the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) shows that in 2007, utilization rates of tariffrate- quotas (TRQ) or MAV for pork increased from five per cent in 2006 to 19 per cent in 2007, indicating more imports of higher-value pork cuts, such as bellies and other unspecified prime cuts.







MAV usage for pork has been relatively low, due in part to the entry of large quantities of buffalo meat with a low tariff rate of 10 per cent and illegally imported pork in the market. Buffalo meat, from India, has been traditionally used in the Philippines as a substitute for pork by the local meat processing industry. MAV utilization is expected to remain low due to the high in-quota duties for pork as well as high pork prices in the world market relative to the price of local pork. Majority of the pork imported in the Philippines is pork rind and pork fat.

WTO Commitments: Since 2005, the DA has continued to maintain 10th or final-year MAV levels under its Uruguay Round commitments. For pork HS 0203, the final-year MAV was 54,210 MT. The DA previously stated that it will continue to do so until such time as a new WTO agreement is reached. In October 2007, the DA announced that it would defer the distribution of 2008 MAV licenses, while it undertakes a review of MAV distribution guidelines. According to the DA, the review is being undertaken in order to allow new entrants and more entities to participate in the MAV system. On 17 January 2008, the DA released the MAV allocations for 2008, pending completion of the review, which temporarily disrupted trade for about 3 months. The review is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2008.

Tariff Rates: In-quota and out-of-quota tariff rates for MAV commodities have not changed since 2005. Tariff rates for pork are as follow:




1 ASEAN Free Trade Agreement-Common Effective Preferential Tariff






Imports: Last year, according to data from the Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), total pork imports increased by 43 per cent, mostly composed of pork rinds or skin and pork fats used by the meat processing industry. The Philippines imported about 32 per cent of its pork requirement from Canada and about 16 per cent from Germany. The United States supplied a little over 13 per cent (10,351 MT), mostly pork offals, fats and other unspecified pork cuts.







Production: Live hog production grew by 2.72 per cent in 2007 and 3.66 per cent in 2006. Hog production is expected to expand in 2008, albeit only marginally, due to increasing cost of feeds. In 2007, the Philippines imported 273 head of swine for breeding from the United States, an increase of 174 percent from the previous year (USDA/ERS FATUS Reports). Already in January 2008, local hog associations reported the arrival of 230 live hogs imported from the United States (see GAIN RP8003).







Consumption: Philippine population is roughly 90 million and growing at a rate of 2.36 per cent per year. According to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, annual per capita consumption of pork at 13.88 kg, grew by 1.39 per cent in 2006, while consumption of pork offal grew by 3.57 per cent.







Processed Meat: Demand for processed meat products is expected to remain strong. Canned food is very popular among Filipino households. Though canned meat/meat products had been losing popularity in recent years due to increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles, demand for such products is being awakened by more aggressive campaigns by suppliers. Due to low Philippine per capita income, demand for frozen food will remain extremely pricesensitive. Hotdogs, hams, sausages, salami and meat patties for burgers are favorite chilled processed meats among consumers.

Demand for imported processed food products will remain relatively strong given the following factors: the growing interest and preference for western style cuisine, an increasing number of dual-income families and the increasing popularity of branded processed products. Additionally, a growing segment of young consumers is demanding imported products as a growing urbanization of the Philippine population spurs this growth.

According to the Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc. (PAMPI), the domestic meat processing industry is forecast to continue to grow. The growing demand for processed meat products, which is estimated to be about 60 percent of the domestic meat market, is expected to drive this growth. Canned goods, in particular, have a strong growth potential due to wide distribution prospects in both traditional retail outlets such as supermarkets and groceries as well as remote neighborhood convenience stores or “sari-sari” stores in rural areas.

PAMPI is looking to expand into the international market. With the recognition of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) that most parts of the country are free from foot-andmouth disease, PAMPI is reportedly optimistic about the country’s potential to export more products and to become the regional production hub for processed meat products.











However, the industry’s growth and export potential are constrained by lack of new investment, an increasing global trend towards more stringent sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements for food products, and a limited source of raw materials, particularly beef, a base ingredient for most canned meat products. Because of the relatively small domestic cattle industry, local meat processors must source most of their meat requirements from outside the country such as India, and South America as well as Australia, Europe and the United States.

Foot-and-Mouth Disease: On 4 January 2008, the Philippine DA filed an application for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) free certification from the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), after having an absence of FMD outbreaks since the start of 2006. Under OIE rules, a country seeking FMD-free zone certification must have had no cases of FMD for at least 24 months before the time of application. According to the DA, an international scientific committee from the OIE will convene in March to evaluate the Philippine application, along with that of other countries. Should the Philippines’ application be favorably received by the committee, the DA expects to receive the FMD-free certification, but with vaccination, from the OIE by May 2008. After one year of attaining FMD-free status, the Philippines may once again apply for a more stringent FMD-free status, with no vaccination if no outbreaks occur. The Visayas and Mindanao islands have already been certified by the OIE as FMD-free in 2002.

The Philippines is hopeful that this certification from the OIE would pave the way for more Philippine meat exports to other countries. The DA is looking at prospective markets in Singapore and China for Philippine pork products. The Philippines is hopeful that the upcoming inspections of Philippine meat facilities by the Singapore government would result in eventual market access for local products.

Currently, the DA’s Bureau of Animal Industry restricts the movement of animals and uncooked/unprocessed meat products, including imported meat products from FMD infected countries, from Luzon to other OIE declared FMD-free zones such as Visayas or Mindanao. Imported meat products from FMD countries are only allowed to enter Luzon, provided that certain measures are in place (i.e., boneless, deglanded meat, with proper maturation and appropriate quarantine protocols, etc.). Moreover, imported meat products from FMD countries may only be imported for use by the meat processing industry and cannot be sold in the retail markets. The BAI is currently implementing a "biosecurity" program, which emphasizes the proper handling of livestock to prevent diseases, instead of vaccinating infected swine.

The Philippine DA will not likely change any policy on the movement of livestock and unprocessed animal products, even after receiving FMD-free, with vaccination certification However, should the Philippines eventually attain FMD-free status, with NO vaccination (expected by May 2009 at the earliest) the current restrictions on the movement of live animals and uncooked meat products may be reviewed, to be made consistent with policies currently implemented in Visayas and Mindanao. These possible changes may have implications on the movement of imported and domestic live animals within the country, as well as importation of meat products from FMD-countries. How these issues are eventually resolved will directly impact U.S. exports of both meat products and livestock.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 10, 2008, 11:39:40 AM
Ditching Pork For Other Meats
PHILIPPINES - Consumers are shifting meat purchases from pork to chicken and goat meat, says Dr. Alice Utlang, a Cebu City veterinarian.



According to the Globalnation-Inquirer, data from the animals slaughtered at the Cebu City abattoir indicate ashift of customers away from pork.

Dr Utlang said that in the first quarter of the year, the number of slaughtered chicken reached 175,711 compared to last year's 52,908. Goat slaughtered at the abattoir also increased from January to March this year from 6,357 to 9,185.

Less hogs were slaughtered at the abattoir in the same period this year with 21,277 hogs compared to last year's 25,446 hogs.

Utlang said lechon (roasted pig) dealers told her that most of their hog suppliers shifted some of their supply to Manila, which is experiencing a scarcity of pork after hog farms in Bulacan, the biggest supplier of hogs in Metro Manila, were affected by hog cholera.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 10, 2008, 11:42:00 AM
Friday, April 04, 2008Print This Page
Two Phase Livelihood Plan aims to Minimise Risk
PHILIPPINES - The Bacolod City Government Employees Multipurpose Cooperative will implement the Swine Livelihood Project in two phases, because it considers the business to be “high risk”.



BACGEM's Board of Directors decided to implement the first phase by giving the responsibility to the officers because of the risk of the animals acquiring Foot and Mouth disease, Hog Cholera virus and other related diseases.

The second phase of the project for the members was supposed to be implemented in the last quarter of 2007, but due to the Hog Cholera Virus that hit the swine industry in Luzon, the supposed series of orientation to inform its members was delayed, it added.

The release also said the swine livelihood project aims to provide income to the cooperative and individual members.

The BACGEM, which was started eleven years ago with an asset of P11,595.80, had grown to P72,569,443.06 as of Dec. 31, 2007, it said.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 10, 2008, 11:44:45 AM
Friday, April 04, 2008Print This Page
Two Phase Livelihood Plan aims to Minimise Risk
PHILIPPINES - The Bacolod City Government Employees Multipurpose Cooperative will implement the Swine Livelihood Project in two phases, because it considers the business to be “high risk”.



BACGEM's Board of Directors decided to implement the first phase by giving the responsibility to the officers because of the risk of the animals acquiring Foot and Mouth disease, Hog Cholera virus and other related diseases.

The second phase of the project for the members was supposed to be implemented in the last quarter of 2007, but due to the Hog Cholera Virus that hit the swine industry in Luzon, the supposed series of orientation to inform its members was delayed, it added.

The release also said the swine livelihood project aims to provide income to the cooperative and individual members.

The BACGEM, which was started eleven years ago with an asset of P11,595.80, had grown to P72,569,443.06 as of Dec. 31, 2007, it said.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mr hog on April 10, 2008, 01:02:02 PM
Some great info sir mikey...Iam back in bizniz!
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 07:48:04 AM
One can go,but one never really leaves,your back on track.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 08:02:27 AM
Government 'Neglect' is Crippling Business, say Producers
CEBU CITY – Pig producers in Central Visayas says that the lack of government support for the local livestock industry is helping to fuel increases to meat prices.


According to GMA News, pig farmers have been asking for assistance amid rising feed prices and escalating inputs costs. Meat vendors in major markets in Cebu City claim that they are losing out as fewer people are buying meat due to the high prices.

The National Federation of hog farmers blamed increasing costs of feeds and other livestock inputs why they could not sell their products at low prices. Amid calls for support, the Department of Agriculture Central Visayas admitted it could only give technical support to hog raisers


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 08:05:36 AM
Expo Tour Leads to Exports
PHILIPPINES - Co-ordination between the National Swine Registry and the local Philippine hog industry during a World Pork Expo Tour has resulted in imports of about $450,000 worth of live breeding swine and semen from the US since last year.

 

A shipment of 230 breeding swine from the US valued at an estimated $270,000 arrived in the Philippines on 8 January.

The imported live breeding swine were:



16 Landrace Boars

73 Landrace Gilts

16 Yorkshire Boars

74 Yorkshire Gilts

20 Duroc Boars

31 Duroc Gilts
Before this shipment, 109 purebred breeding swine valued at $152,000 in addition to an estimated $30,000 worth of hog semen were imported from the US and arrived during July and August last year.

The live swine and semen imports are the result of Post’s assistance in organising and facilitating arrangements for a 50-plus Philippine tour group to World Pork Expo in Des Moines, Iowa, in June last year.

Post worked closely with the National Swine Registry in packaging the tour, which included an orientation and educational tour of US hog farms in Iowa shortly before the World Pork Expo.
 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 10:32:53 AM
New hog farm to benefit Sumilao farmers - San Miguel
PHILIPPINES - San Miguel Corporation (SMC) has appealed to Sumilao farmers who have marched to Manila to “try to look at the bigger picture" in staking their claim on a 144-hectare property in Bukidnon where the company is constructing a state-of-the-art hog farm facility.


In a statement, San Miguel Foods Inc. (SMFI), a subsidiary of SMC, said the farmers need to examine their claims without bias in order to allow both parties to move forward “towards sustainable growth for the province."

The SMFI also maintained that its hog farm project in Sumilao is “anchored on creating shared value both for the company and the community - the farmers in particular" in the province.

“The company earnestly believes in its capability to transform the Sumilao farmers into partner-agricultural entrepreneurs with SMFI serving as stable buyer of their produce - at guaranteed prices," SMFI said.

According to SMFI, the local government of Sumilao invited them to the province as the local government wishes to uplift the social conditions in the province and provide sustainable livelihood for the community that is mostly made up of farmers.

The SMFI said that while there were other “equally attractive offers from other provinces for the company to invest" they chose to put up their hog expansion project in Sumilao because of its commitment to become “a positive force in countryside development" through the building of “stronger communities" and “enhancing individual capabilities."



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 10:47:25 AM
Matutum Meat seeks full government accreditation

KORONADAL CITY -- One of the pork meat processing firms tapped to pioneer the country's foray into the export market has not been given permanent accreditation by the government because it lacked requirements, a top meat inspection official said Friday.

Jose Ariel Billones, director of the National Meat Inspection Service-Central Mindanao, noted that what Matutum Meat Packing Corporation has until now is a conditional "AAA" accreditation.

Arroyo Watch: Sun.Star blog on President Arroyo

"The temporary accreditation is set to expire this November. The firm will only be granted permanent accreditation until it submits the necessary requirements," he said in a telephone interview.

Among the requirements for a permanent accreditation, but which is still subject for a yearly renewal, is the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system clearance and establishment of a mini laboratory, Billones said.

But he revealed that Matutum Meat, which is based in Polomolok town, is now in the process of compliance so the firm's operations will not go unhampered once the temporary accreditation expires in November.

"They're doing everything so they will not experience future glitches," Billones said, referring to the looming shipment of the firm's cut pork products outside the country.

Matutum Meat, along with the Davao-based Nenita Quality Foods Corporation, was tapped early this year by the Department of Agriculture for the country's first pork meat shipment abroad, particularly Singapore.

Billones said that Singaporean food and sanitary officials are expected to arrive in Mindanao next month to inspect the facilities of Matutum Meat as well as the condition of piggeries in the area.

Earlier, Stephen Castillo, Matutum Meat general manager, said Singapore has not yet issued an export certificate to the firm pending another round of ocular inspection.

Singaporean experts visited South Cotabato last year to initially assess the condition of the swine industry in the area.

Castillo, in various interviews, expressed confidence the firm could meet the rigid standards set by Singapore, as well as regulations observed in the Philippines.

The firm, which has been in operation for four months now, operates state-of-the art facilities in the venture with an investment of some P200 million. With basically automated machines, the firm has the capacity to process 240 pigs an hour. The company has been serving the domestic market since its operation started.

It is a sister company of the Cebu-based Sunpride Foods Inc., maker of Holiday corned beef and Sunpride canned goods.

Sunpride's slaughterhouse has a long-standing "AAA" rating, supposedly the highest accreditation issued by the NMIS.


For more Philippine news,

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 11, 2008, 10:58:18 AM
IN NEGROS OCCIDENTAL
OPV sustains services
to ensure animal health 
The Office of the Provincial Veterinarian in Negros Occidental is sustaining its animal health support services to avoid an outbreak of endemic disease in the province, Provincial Veterinarian Renante Decena said in a report to Gov. Joseph Marañon this week.

The report detail the activities of the OPV for the month of July amid reports of hog cholera and other swine diseases outbreak in Luzon provinces.

Decena said Negros Occidental is free from threats of hog cholera, but the OPV has intensified its hog vaccination campaign to ensure protection of hog farms in the province.

In July 2007, OPV said it has vaccinated 54,125 and dewormed 36,974 farm animals. Also, 37,214 animals were diagnosed, treated and castrated. Under the slaughterhouse and livestock auction market, slaughtered were more than 1.198 million animals. These include 996 cattle; 1,652 carabaos; 614 goats; 13,873 hogs; and almost 1.181 million poultry.

The OPV Diagnostic Laboratory examined 581 animals for the period.

Under its Paravet Development Program, 201 paravets attended the 17 paravet/raisers association meetings conducted for the period. Registration of five hog raisers associations are also being processed. As part of its Veterinary Regulation Services, OPV approved the shipment of 102,329 animals, including 16,043 gamefowls; 4,524 hogs; 3,407 goats; and 78,000 old chicks.

Animal byproducts, including meat, shipped from Negros Occidental included 32,160 hatching, table and salted eggs; 203 kilos processed meat and 100,941 dressed chickens.*NLG

 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 12, 2008, 12:05:22 PM
Chinese consortium pledges $5B for agro-industrial projects

A chinese consortium recently inked an agreement with governors of six provinces and Filipino-Chinese company, SL Agritech Corporation (SLAC), to establish an agro-industrial processing enter, and develop 1.3 million hectares for the production of Chinese hybrid corn and hybrid sorghum.

The Fuhua Agricultural Group of China, headed by its Chairman and CEO Liu Ye, pledged to invest five billion dollars in a processing center that will be located in one of six provinces, namely, Camarines Sur, Lanao del Norte, Isabela, Occidental Mindoro, Tarlac and Nueva Ecija. The center will house a feed mill, a brewery, a food factory, a corn processing plant, a cattle raising facility, a slaughterhouse, and biological medicinal garden. Its Philippine partner, SLAC, which is headed by President Henry Lim Liong, is a pioneer in hybrid rice production in the country.

In adition to one million hectares for corn production, the group will also develop 300,000 hectares for cultivation of Chinese hybrid sorghum. Liong said that China’s industrialization is using up its agricultural lands and it is trying to build food baskets in neighboring countries like the Philippines.

National Hog Federation:
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 13, 2008, 06:19:25 AM
ARMM can export hogs to other provinces -- reports


By Nash Maulana
Mindanao Bureau
First Posted 06:22pm (Mla time) 04/10/2008


COTABATO CITY, Philippines -- In the midst of increasing prices of meat, enterprising buyers may find it profitable to import hogs from the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM).

A low demand for swine in a region of over five million Muslims and with Christians representing only three percent of the population explains a growing supply of hogs in the ARMM, officials say.

Inventory of animal live weight by the Department of Agriculture shows the region has a stable cattle supply at 10,734 metric tons (MT), which barely outweighs swine at 9,599 MT.

The region has 6,798 MT of water buffalo, 5,972 MT of goat; 8,623 MT of chicken, and 1,486 MT of duck, according to the 2007 ARMM Livestock and Poultry Industry Report.

Swine raising for food is prohibited among Muslims, but some Muslim hunters are up for wild pigs to be bartered for bullets with enterprising non-Muslim dealers.

In terms of hog headcount, Maguindanao posted the highest at 121,140, outnumbering both cattle (41,763) and goats (118,918) in that province.

ARMM is composed of Basilan, Lanao Sur, Maguindanao, Shariff Kabunsuan, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi.

But ARMM Agriculture Secretary Sajid Druz Ali, who hails from Maguindanao, said the region has not been promoting the marketing of pigs. Instead, he said, the region has been strengthening its halal (permitted food) industry with intensified research and development endeavors, improved slaughter houses' facilities as well as healthier and stable cattle and poultry supply.

Ali said agriculture officials gained, from a recent trip to Australia, more knowledge about processing of halal meat, and a commitment of grant in the form of a mobile halal slaughter facility from an organization of Australian Muslims.

An Arabic word "halal" means "permissible" or "lawful" and is the opposite of haram or "prohibited" which is what pigs are for Muslims.

Dr. Norodin Kuit, chief of livestock division of the ARMM's agriculture department, said the swine supply figures naturally increased as pigs were neither slaughtered for food, nor butchered to be sold in the region's marketplaces.

Kuit said traditional Muslim leaders also did not impose strict prohibition of backyard hog-raising among non-Muslim residents.

Ali and Kuit cited as example their hometown of Ampatuan in Maguindanao, where Christians and the Manobo tribe have been freely practicing their ways of life without being reprimanded by Muslim leaders on traditions and practices inconsistent with their beliefs.

In Basilan, there are also more pigs (28,260) than there are goats (24,392), cows (3,685) and carabaos or water buffalo (13,354), the report said.

The house of the Janjalanis, founders of the extremist Abu Sayyaf Group, in Tabuk, Isabela City (Basilan), is closer to backyard hog-raising neighbors than it is to a mosque or to the community madrasa (Arabic school).

Pigs are lowest in number in Lanao Sur (2,700) and Sulu (410), as compared to goats (63,338); cows (42,194); Carabao (52,058) in Lanao Sur, and goat (29,042); cow (12,250); carabao (470) in Sulu, the report said.

But in Tawi-Tawi, there are still more pigs (710) than there are carabaos (93), but are lesser in number than cows (2,492) and goats (10,214).

Meanwhile, an ARMM press statement said the region had a total of 28,243 hectares of irrigated lands, and that 7,209 more hectares would be irrigated in the next three years.

ARMM issued the statement amid fears of impending rice shortage in the country and other parts of the world.

According to DA national statistics, the country produced 15,327,314 metric tons of rice in 2007. ARMM contributed 3.56 percent or 545,211 metric tons to the national production level.

Figures also indicated that the region had 64.8 percent sufficiency level and 35.2 percent deficiency level in the 2006 rice production.

Of the region's six provinces, Maguindanao has the most areas of agricultural land planted to rice at 69,500 hectares.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 13, 2008, 06:47:22 AM
Malolos, Philippines
   
Pork prices soar in Metro
Posted by roboblogger on Thursday Apr 3

“It may take until July before the supply normalizes, because our backyard raisers lost their hogs (to disease)”

The price of pork in Metro Manila has increased over the past few weeks partly due to a shortage of hogs in Bulacan, which supplies 60 percent of at least 6,000 hogs that the metropolis requires every day. via ABS-CBN News

 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 16, 2008, 08:09:40 AM
Philippine Hog Industry To Grow This Year
MANILA - The Philippine Department of Agriculture has expressed confidence that the local hog industry will expand by 3.5 percent this year, with exports to Singapore, the Americas, Russia, Japan and other Asian countries rising.


Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said aside from frozen meat, eight other processed meat items might penetrate other markets as the Philippines moves closer to being declared totally free of the dreaded foot-and-mouth disease by the Office Internationale des Epizooties or Animal Health Organization.

These meat products are luncheon meat, spam, pork and beans, lechon paksiw, pork adobo, sisig, chili con carne, and bistek tagalog.

Yap said, "Singapore is willing to accept Philippine exports of fresh, frozen meat subject to certain conditions, which are being worked out. We are looking at Japan, which is the world's top meat importer, as another major market for our meat exports."

The Department of Agriculture is eyeing the Japan market for freeze-dried and ready-to-cook meat products. Japan imported 1.32 million metric tons of meat in 2005.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 16, 2008, 08:12:20 AM
Stakeholders assure ample supply of corn for livestock,
PHILIPPINES - Private stakeholders in the corn industry assured of a stable supply of corn at market levels that would enable hog and poultry growers to maintain the retail prices of meat and chicken at current levels.


In a recent meeting with stakeholders of the industry, Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said the DA was told that with corn farmers surpassing their dry season production targets during the first quarter of 2007, reports of a supply shortfall of corn are actually misleading, if not baseless.

"There is actually no shortage. The reason for relatively strong corn prices in the local market is the high demand and price abroad, which is a result of factors such as the increasing demand for corn as a biofuel feedstock and the drought in Australia," Yap said.

Representatives of the Philippine Maize Federation Inc. (Philmaize), the country's federation of corn industry stakeholders, told Yap during the meeting that even with yellow corn costing as high as P12 a kilo, they do not expect hog and poultry growers to raise prices, owing to the stable supply of the grain, which is a major component in livestock and poultry feeds.

"With this year's high production and with imports ready to fill-in any projected shortfall during the lean months, we do not see any problem with our corn supply that would adversely affect the livestock and poultry subsectors," said Philmaize vice chairman Isidro Acosta.

Yap himself noted that in Pangasinan alone, corn growers have reported a 10 percent jump in dry season production.

The off-season production project of the DA's Ginintuang Masaganang Ani (GMA) Corn Program encourages farmers to plant during the months of February to April to enable them to harvest during the lean months.

DA Assistant Secretary and GMA Corn Program Director Dennis Araullo said there is a projected seven percent increment in production from January to June this year compared to last year's level for the same period.

At present, corn sells between P11 to P12 a kilo.

Araullo said this price level is "sustainable" and acceptable to corn farmers, who are now encouraged to plant more because of the sustained profits in corn production.

Corn production, which reached 6.08 million metric tons (MT) last year, is targeted to increase to 6.92 million MT in 2007 -- indicating a 13.73 percent growth rate.

Araullo said the DA's off-season production target, covering a total of 132,000 hectares, is expected to yield an additional 350,000 to 400,000 MT of corn this year.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 16, 2008, 08:20:03 AM
Hog farmers promoting
frozen pork consumption 
The National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. is promoting the consumption of frozen pork among Filipinos as the Department of Agriculture is strengthening its "Pork in a Box" program.

NFHFI president Albert R.T. Lim said the hog industry will soon launch a campaign that will encourage consumers to buy frozen pork, whose quality, he said, is the same as non-frozen pork sold in meat shops. Since Filipinos have aversion to frozen meats, believing that these are no longer fresh, Lim said hog raisers want them to know that "there's nothing wrong with frozen pork."

In fact, the pork juices can be preserved better if it is frozen, he said, adding that it is actually a practice in homes to put meat inside the freezers, if there is no need to cook it immediately. The DA said "Pork in a Box" players noted that the program, launched in 2005, was not received well, primarily because chilled/frozen pork is not widely preferred by consumers.

Through "Pork in a Box, " the transport of live hogs is eliminated as only chilled or frozen carcass and cut products from Mindanao and Visayas, including Negros Occidental, are brought to markets in Metro Manila.

Lim said the hog farmers are glad the DA has strengthened the program to enable them to take part in the supply chain and provide the consumers easy access to quality pork cuts at a lower price.

The farmgate price of pork is now pegged at P75 per kilo, but the market price can go as high as P120. Prices, however, can still go down to P97 to P100 per kilo, if levels of middlemen are reduced and without add-on cost in marketing pork products.

"We will now be able to control the market and stabilize pork prices," he said, adding that since live hogs are no longer transported, there is also low risk of disease transmission among hogs.

Lim said that, in the past two years, Negrense hog farmers have stopped shipping live hogs to Luzon and since then, have been selling to buyers from Cebu.*NLG

 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 19, 2008, 10:25:34 AM
Friday, April 18, 2008Print This Page
Hog Raisers Conference - Technology Focus
PHILIPPINES - Commercial and backyard pig producers will gather at the Cebu International Convention Center in Mandaue City on April 24 to 26 for the 17th Annual Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc.



Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap will be the keynote speaker and guest of honor.

The convention, which will feature the latest swine production techniques and new equipment and medications for hogs, will be hosted by the Cebu Association of Meat and Poultry Products Multi-Purpose Cooperative headed by Pluy Ong. This year’s theme will be “Enhancing Pork production for the Export Market.”

NFHFI President Albert Lim Jr. said the convention aims to help promote and protect the interests of the country’s hog farmers and to serve as a venue to enhance the opportunities for growth, efficiency, equity and sustainability of the P120-billion hog industry.

It will also feature a series of seminars on swine management and production, and the eradication of common swine diseases as well as a live hog exhibit.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 21, 2008, 08:26:01 AM
 Singapore News   
 
  AVA approves pork imports from Chile, Philippines
By Hoe Yeen Nie, Channel NewsAsia | Posted: 14 April 2008 2012 hrs   

SINGAPORE : Singaporeans will soon have more options when buying pork. The Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) has told Channel NewsAsia that it has approved the import of pork from Chile and the Philippines.

Singapore currently imports chilled and frozen pork from nine countries.

Most of the pork consumed here comes from Indonesia and Australia. And in future, it will be brought in from Chile and the Philippines as well.

But this will take some time because only two slaughterhouses in Chile have been approved to export frozen pork here.

AVA said that supply will depend on market forces.

Meanwhile, AVA is still processing the application from Philippine slaughterhouses.

NTUC FairPrice has welcomed the move to diversify Singapore's food sources.

Sales of frozen pork at its outlets have gone up by three times in the past three months.

It attributes this to due to, among other reasons, greater awareness on AVA's public education campaign on frozen meat.

More pork may also soon come from Malaysia, after a decade-long ban, which came into effect in 1999, when the Nipah virus - which is carried by pigs - struck some Malaysian farms, killing some 100 pig farmers there.

Malaysian newspaper 'The Star' on Sunday reported that a farm in Sarawak may soon export live pigs to Singapore.

But AVA said it has not received any official application from Sarawak.

It added that the application will need to meet Singapore's food safety standards. - CNA/ms


 
 
 

 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 23, 2008, 08:24:10 AM
 Home > Regions > Mindanao Davao hog raisers face crises
JOEL B. ESCOVILLA, Correspondent, BusinessWorld
04/22/2008 | 04:51 AM

Email this | Email the Editor | Print | Digg this | Add to del.icio.us DAVAO CITY, Philippines - About 30% of backyard hog raisers in this city have folded up and a lot more are expected to follow due to rising cost of operation.

Davao Hog Raisers Association chairman, Teresita Pascual, said that losing more backyard hog raisers is alarming because they constitute 70% of the whole industry in the city.

She said other backyard raisers are holding on to their last stock, while some of them have sold off their remaining sows to send their children to nursing school. "They told us that it’s a better investment because their children will also earn P100,000 each month when they go abroad," she said.

Ms. Pascual said the backyard raisers could not cope with the expenses of renovating the pens, building sprinkling systems, and improving the ventilation to prevent heat stroke and diseases among the hogs caused by the intense heat. "It used to be that hog raisers allot one square meter per head; now, we have to double that," she said.

For those who plan to invest in commercial-scale hog farming, she said, P50 million would be an ideal investment for 500 sows at P100,000 per head, which could yield 80% return in three years time.

The situation has caused the farm-gate price of hogs to jump from P78 per kilogram last December to the present average of P90/kg.

Hog raisers, Ms. Pascual added, used to produce 10 piglets for each sow; but productivity dropped to six or seven piglets while the rearing period lengthened for each piglet. "Now traders don’t ask how much, they ask if there’s still stock left," she said.

Ms. Pascual also cited the price of feeds which tripled from five years ago, which she partly blamed on the government’s strategy to promote biofuel stock that, she argued, competed with the needs of her industry.

But William C. Barangan, provincial director of the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics-XI, said the first quarter of the year is considered as seasonally lean months for corn in the country, adding the situation is expected to ease up by the end of the month.

He said the provinces of Bukidnon and Cotabato, the primary corn-producing areas in Mindanao, were also affected by incessant rains which pushed farm-gate prices up to over P13 from P10 last December.

Rising farm-gate prices of hogs provoked meat vendors in Bankerohan, the biggest public market here, to ask the city council to investigate the possibility of price manipulation. In a resolution submitted to the council last month, the Bankerohan Meat Vendors Association asked Councilor Edgar R. Ibuyan to look "into the drastic and continuing increase" of farm-gate price of hogs.

"The hog raisers may have a valid reason to raise farm-gate prices probably due to higher production cost," Mr. Ibuyan said. "But we want to ascertain that these farm-gate prices are reasonable and fair."

Current market stall price of pork in Bankerohan is now P145/kg, up from P120/kg in February
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mr hog on April 23, 2008, 12:12:07 PM
Mikey does not look good for some..I will have to do a major upgrade..build more fattener cages hehe also increase my numbers of sows by 10 fold.so I can keep all happy!
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 29, 2008, 08:32:07 AM
Monday, April 28, 2008
In-breeding in pigs causes defects, small litter-expert

CROSS breeding is a better alternative to in-breeding even for backyard pig farms, a British expert said during the recently concluded hog convention.

Dr. Rex Walters of the British Pig Association said that while in-breeding—allowing swine and sow from the same breed to mate and reproduce—is commonly practiced by pig farms, it increases the possibilities of animal defects and lesser litter yield per year.

Cross breeding, however, improves survival rate of piglets and increases by about six percent the litter size per year, Walters said during the 17th Convention.

The use of good genetics for production would result in a large number of pigs per year, as well as fast and efficient growth, he said. He also said that good genetics would result in pigs with big appetites that, in turn, will lead to better quality pork.

Walters, who talked about the importance of genetics in the improvement of pig reproductive performance, mentioned technological advancements and methods used in hog farming abroad.

But he said these technologies, like the use of DNA technology and the utilization of biochemical pathway, have yet to be adopted in the country.

Cross breeding, on the other hand, can be processed naturally and at a lower cost, which would be an efficient method of reproduction that can be used by local hog raisers.

He pointed out that the Philippines is the 10th biggest hog producer worldwide. (Strawberry Yap, STC Intern)
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 29, 2008, 09:12:22 AM
Philippines Livestock and Products Pork Market Report 2008
By USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. This article provides the pork industry data from the USDA FAS Livestock and Products Pork Market report for the Philippines. A link to the full report is also provided. The full report includes all the tabular data which we have omitted from this article.

 

Report Highlights:
Imports of pork and pork products increased by 43 percent in 2007, mostly made up of pork skin or rinds and fats, for use in meat processing. Majority of pork imports were sourced from Canada (32 percent), Germany (16 percent) and the United States (13 percent). Minimum Access Volume (MAV) utilization for pork increased from 5 percent to 19 percent last year, indicating an increase in importation of more premium pork cuts. In October 2007, the Philippine Department of Agriculture announced that it would be reviewing its MAV regulations, which is expected to be completed within the first quarter of 2008.

Tariff Rate Quota: Data from the Minimum Access Volume (MAV) Management Committee of the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) shows that in 2007, utilization rates of tariff rate quotas (TRQ) or MAV for pork increased from 5 percent in 2006 to 19 percent in 2007, indicating more imports of higher-value pork cuts, such as bellies and other unspecified prime cuts.

MAV usage for pork has been relatively low, due in part to the entry of large quantities of buffalo meat with a low tariff rate of 10 percent and illegally imported pork in the market. Buffalo meat, from India, has been traditionally used in the Philippines as a substitute for pork by the local meat processing industry. MAV utilization is expected to remain low due to the high in-quota duties for pork as well as high pork prices in the world market relative to the price of local pork. Majority of the pork imported in the Philippines is pork rind and pork fat.

WTO Commitments: Since 2005, the DA has continued to maintain 10th or final-year MAV levels under its Uruguay Round commitments. For pork HS 0203, the final-year MAV was 54,210 MT. The DA previously stated that it will continue to do so until such time as a new WTO agreement is reached. In October 2007, the DA announced that it would defer the distribution of 2008 MAV licenses, while it undertakes a review of MAV distribution guidelines. According to the DA, the review is being undertaken in order to allow new entrants and more entities to participate in the MAV system. On January 17, 2008, the DA released the MAV allocations for 2008, pending completion of the review, which temporarily disrupted trade for about 3 months. The review is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2008.

Tariff Rates: In-quota and out-of-quota tariff rates for MAV commodities have not changed since 2005.

Imports: Last year, according to data from the Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), total pork imports increased by 43 percent, mostly composed of pork rinds or skin and pork fats used by the meat processing industry. The Philippines imported about 32 percent of its pork requirement from Canada and about 16 percent from Germany. The United States supplied a little over 13 percent (10,351 MT), mostly pork offals, fats and other unspecified pork cuts.

Production: Live hog production grew by 2.72 percent in 2007 and 3.66 percent in 2006. Hog production is expected to expand in 2008, albeit only marginally, due to increasing cost of feeds. In 2007, the Philippines imported 273 head of swine for breeding from the United States, an increase of 174 percent from the previous year (USDA/ERS FATUS Reports). Already in January 2008, local hog associations reported the arrival of 230 live hogs imported from the United States (see GAIN RP8003).

Consumption: Philippine population is roughly 90 million and growing at a rate of 2.36 percent per year. According to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, annual per capita consumption of pork at 13.88 kg, grew by 1.39 percent in 2006, while consumption of pork offal grew by 3.57 percent.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 06, 2008, 08:14:44 AM
Monday, May 05, 2008Print This Page
Pork and Chicken Price Changes Differ
THE PHILIPPINES - According to ABS-CBN, while the price of pork goes down, chicken prices take a leap.



The price of pork in markets will soon go down -- in five to six months' time, that is.

According to agriculture undersecretary Salvador Salacup, the supply of pork will go back to its normal levels by October or November this year, eventually leading to lower prices.

Pork prices reached a high of up to around P180 per kilo following an illness that struck hogs during the last quarter of 2007.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 14, 2008, 11:08:55 AM
Tuesday, May 13, 2008Print This Page
Singapore: Pork Processing Firm Accredited
SINGAPORE - According to Sun Star, Singapore has finally ratified the country's plan to export cut pork products. This has, thereby, enabled a local pork processing firm in Mindanao, officials from the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) report.



Jane C. Bacayo, NMIS executive director, said Matutum Meat Packing Corp was recently given the green light to ship frozen pork parts in Singapore by that country's Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA).

Matutum Meat, based in nearby Polomolok in South Cotabato province, was one of two Mindanao firms earlier identified by the Department of Agriculture to pioneer the country's foray in the foreign pork market. The other one is the Davao City-based Nenita's Quality Foods Corp.

Ma. Elizabeth D. Callanta, NMIS export coordinator for Singapore, said the private sector would embark on a trade mission to Singapore to discuss arrangements with meat dealers there.

"We hope that we can start exporting pork meat parts to Singapore next month with Matutum Meat taking the lead," she said.

Callanta said Nenita's application to export pork meat products to Singapore has not yet been approved as there are corrective actions that need to be done for its facilities.

Also involved in the program is the Bureau of Animal Industry, another attached agency of the Department of Agriculture, Callanta said.

In March, Jose Ariel B. Billones, NMIS regional meat inspector, said Singapore has approved the country's bid to export frozen cut pork meat products to the island state.

But it was only last April 28 that AVA officially listed in its website Matutum Meat as a pork meat exporter to Singapore, the only company from the Philippines. Singapore also allows companies from 25 other countries to export meat products in the island state.

Matutum Meat, a sister company of Cebu-based Sunpride Foods, Inc. which produces Holiday corned beef and Sunpride canned goods, has invested around P200 million for its state-of-the-art processing plant in Polomolok town.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 16, 2008, 08:51:00 AM
Thursday, May 15, 2008Print This Page
DA Supports Import of 38,000 MT Pork
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) is encouraging the importation of 38,000 metric tons (MT) of pork under the minimum access volume (MAV) program in order to augment supply and help cut the price of pork in the local market, reports Manila Bulletin.



DA Secretary Arthur C. Yap said the importation of the low tariff-bearing MAV program will ease hog price in the market along with government’s breeder restocking and vaccination program.

The MAV program over the past few years was not being utilized by the private sector due to the previously higher availability of swine locally. But now that hog price hit R200 per kilo, now settling at R180 to R195 per kilo, DA believes private companies that have allocation under the MAV should import their allotted volume.

The country imports pork from Germany, United States, and Europe. It has abstained from importing the meat from neighboring Asian countries due to the absence of proper quarantine procedures in importation and due to prevailing diseases like foot and mouth disease and hog cholera in these countries.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 21, 2008, 10:11:41 AM
Tuesday, May 20, 2008Print This Page
"Double Dead" Pork Confiscated at Quezon City
QUEZON CITY - ABS-CBN News has reported that a minimum of 3 tons of "double dead" pork were seized at Quezon City by the National Meat Inspection Service earlier today.



According to NMIS executive director, Jane Bacayo, the contraband was confiscated at Balintawak market during an operation conducted around 1 a.m.

Bacayo said the raid was done based on a tip from an informant about the arrival of the double dead meat.

"Look at this one. The meat has no NMIS mark. All of these [meat] did not go through NMIS inspection," Bacayo told reporters while holding a slab of double dead pork.

Bacayo said buyers should avoid buying pork that costs only P120 per kilogram. He said the public should not risk their health and avoid buying cheap pork, which, he said, are usually double dead.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 22, 2008, 06:00:30 AM
Meat, fish prices to go up in the Philippines
[1 May 2008] Prices of meat, chicken and fish are likely to rise further in June in the Philippines as local feedmillers are poised to increase prices following the soaring cost of feed inputs such as soybeans, coconut oil, wheat bran and rice bran. Philippine Association of Feed Millers Inc President Norman Ramos said that feed prices are going up, although he declined to say by how much saying this will depend on individual companies. Mr Ramos had earlier warned of difficult times ahead with cost of production increasing 30%.

 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mr hog on May 22, 2008, 10:59:00 AM
So mikey are they saying a 30 per cent increasing of the feed prices to go up?or just production costs?
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 22, 2008, 11:55:31 AM
Mr.Hog,the feedmillers are saying their production cost are up 30%.That will be passed on to us the livestock producers,this drives up the producers cost,the producer wants a scapegoat the (consumer) to pay for the producers increase in cost.I guess we will find out in June.Looks like interesting times ahead.This will drive away more people from wanting to farm.Time will tell.
mikey
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mr hog on May 22, 2008, 12:47:37 PM
All I have to say is how will people afford these extra costs? People have to eat meat?gov better step in already maybe to late now.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: nemo on May 23, 2008, 12:13:55 AM
Usually June to October are the months when the prices of pork would go down. Hopefully this trend would be still true. So, people could still eat pork.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 23, 2008, 06:08:48 AM
Well,if the price of pork drops in June,but the feeds increase.Where does this leave us producers?
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 27, 2008, 08:44:19 AM
Monday, May 26, 2008Print This Page
Aklan Government Contemplating Hog Farming
THE PHILIPPINES - The government of the province of Aklan is contemplating venturing into hog-raising to help meet the supply of pork in the province.



Aklan Governor Carlito Marquez raised this possibility during the recent Local Price Coordination Council (LPCC) meeting here in response to concerns raised by some food processors here that there is a low supply of pork in the province.

A leading food processor here is said to be hesitant to avail of financial assistance from the government as it is not assured of a steady supply of raw meat.

According to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) here, Aklan currently lacks supply of hogs for slaughter. Buyers are said to be sourcing their supply from Capiz backyards. Based on household interviews, BAS revealed that Aklanons currently raised pigs for fiestas.

The Office of the Provincial Veterinarian (OPVET) here bared that Aklan is not operating big piggeries anymore, due to high prices of feeds.

Presently, the province is focusing on livestock production at Tina, Makato, with on-going pasture and forage production, large and small ruminant production, cattle fattening and production, and goat upgrading programs.

The OPVET said the site in Makato is also ideal for hog production. The provincial government through OPVET is currently implementing a swine dispersal program on a rollover scheme among provincial employees.

To help in this concern, council members urged the Office of the Provincial Agriculturist to request Municipal Agricultural Officers (MAOs) all over the province to encourage swine production in their areas.

Governor Marquez, for his part, said the low supply of pork meat might have been caused by the high demand of processed meat products in the market, noting that some companies have branches that have sprouted in the region and even in Manila.

He advised these food processors to operate a piggery too to have a sure supply of pork for their business needs.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 07, 2008, 12:35:34 PM
Friday, June 06, 2008Print This Page
Philippine Province Suffers from Pork Shortage
MARINDUQUE - Local government officials have reported on a shortage of pork in Marinduque province which has led to prices being driven up to as much as P190 per kg.



Carlito Fabaleña, provincial director of the Department of Trade and Industry, confirmed complaints from consumers on the rising prices of meat products and the scarcity of supply in the province, according to the Inquirer.

He said there was basis to believe that massive export of pork from the province to other provinces could be one of the reasons for the shortage.

Dr. Josue Victoria, provincial veterinarian, said illegal traders were contributing to the shortage of pork in the province.

The illegal traders, he said, were reported to be scooping up pork in the towns of Gasan, Buenavista, Sta. Cruz, Boac and Torrijos.

“Hog raisers cross other provinces to sell their pigs to those who offer a higher buying price or they wait for traders coming in from other provinces,” said Gerry Mayo, a hog raiser from Sta. Cruz.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 18, 2008, 07:36:05 AM
Tuesday, June 17, 2008Print This Page
Hog and Poultry Industries See Hope
THE PHILIPPINES - Despite escalating chicken and pork prices, prospects for the hog and poultry industries are bright as the agriculture department has been taking concrete steps to stabilize domestic supplies.



Department of Agriculture (DA) Secretary Arthur Yap said the Philippines remain free of the avian influenza or bird flu and the continuous disease control and eradication programs of the Bureau of Animal Industry have boosted chances for the whole Philippines to be declared totally free from the Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) by the Animal Health Organization by the end of 2008 or early 2009.

Surveillance, vaccination, quarantine and treatment programs to fight cholera, Newcastle, fowl pox and other hog and chicken diseases are also being stepped up by the DA on its own or in partnership with local government units (LGUS).

For cattle, the DA has been undertaking, among others, programs on breeder stock infusion and genetic improvement as well as land tenure and pasture lease negotiations, according to DA Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup.

Moreover, the DA has a slew of initiatives like the pork-in-a-box project that is meant to provide consumers with greater access but affordable beef, chicken and pork products, the DA officials said.

ASEC Salacup said they have been monitoring the domestic market situation and work out further intervention measures that might be needed to further boost domestic production and stabilize both supply and prices of these basic foodstuff.

The DA have been working with leaders of livestock and poultry groups on issues affecting these industries and have been working with these people to meet the meat, poultry and egg requirements of Filipino consumers, Salacup said.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 22, 2008, 10:16:04 AM
Less animal feed in the Philippines
// 11 jun 2008

Animal feed production in the Philippines is expected to drop 7.7 percent this year to 6.0 million metric tons due to weaker demand, a former official of Philippine Association of Feed Millers Inc. said.


Last year, animal feed production was 6.5 million tons, down from 7.0 million tons, former association vice president Ric Pinca said. Pinca told reporters that demand drop was due largely to increasing cost of feed inputs, such as soybean meal and coconut oil.

"The lower demand for feeds may also be due to increasing prices of meat and poultry, which have softened the consumer demand for these products," Pinca said.

He added that animal diseases were also a direct factor in the drop in demand for feeds. Last year, a spate of diseases wiped out about 20 percent of backyard pig farms, he said.

The weaker demand for feed made the feed millers association ask for removal of tariffs on feed inputs, particularly soybeans, soybean meal, DDGS and tapioca residue pellets. Soybeans are subject to a tariff of 1.0 percent, soybean meal to 3.0 percent, DDGS to 3.0 percent, and tapioca to 35 percent.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 23, 2008, 11:06:17 AM
Antibiotic Sourced from Mushroom to Boost RP Livestock       
The National Research Council of the Philippines, an advisory body of the Department of Science and Technology, announced the discovery of an antibiotic-producing microorganism from mushroom which has been found to be effective in treating diseases of livestock, particularly

swine.

Dr. Asuncion Raymundo, an NRCP plant pathologist, led a research team that analyzed the DNA thread or the genetic code of the mushroom species Clitopilus passeckerianus. Dr. Raymundo and her group employed classical and recombinant DNA techniques to determine how this particular species produces the antibiotic called pleuromutilin.

 Pleuromutilin prevents the bacteria from producing protein, an essential component of its diet.  Without protein, bacteria stops reproducing and consequently dies. Pleuromutilin also acts as the building block for the production of tiamulin, a biological compound effective in treating common hog diseases such as mycoplasmas, arthritis, enzootic pneumonia, and dysentery.

According to the PCARRD 2001 Highlights, the Philippines continues to hold a competitive position as among the leading hog raisers in the Asian Region.  However, the report also states that Luzon's production rate—compared to that of Mindanao and Visayas—has plummeted in 2001 compared to earlier years. One of the reasons is the high mortality rate among swines on account of disease.  The NRCP antibiotic derived from the mushroom has the clear potential to solve this problem.

Like tomatoes and apples, mushroom is a fruit.  Scientists classify this fleshy fruit under the fungi kingdom—multi-cell microorganism that get their "food" and energy from other organisms. For thousand of years, humankind has recognized the varied uses of mushrooms. In addition to being an effective fermenting agent, it is also considered an efficient waste disposer and major manufacturer of organic fertilizer. It can grow everywhere and anywhere — from farm animal manure, from spoiled food in the kitchen, to the dead barks and leaves in the deepest reaches of foliage.

This latest NRCP research proves that the mushroom could no longer be ignored nor relegated as among the bottom dwellers in the plant kingdom. The discovery of pleuromutillin and tiamulin should prompt stronger government funding and support in order to boost the country's hograising industry and propel it to even greater global competitiveness.
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 31, 2008, 09:03:03 AM
Wednesday, July 30, 2008Print This Page
Meat Laboratory Inaugurated in South Cotabato
THE PHILIPPINES - Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap spearheaded the opening of the state-of-the-art P20 million meat laboratory as swine industry stakeholders brace for the country's shipment of pork meat products to Singapore.



He said the facility is a big boost to the livestock industry not just for South Cotabato but for the whole country as well. Mindanao has been chosen by the National Government to initiate the country's pork export since the island has been certified as free from the dreaded foot-and-mouth disease.

He added that he is bullish that pork meat from the Philippines can penetrate the Asia-Pacific region, starting with Singapore.

Singaporean investors visiting the processing plant of Matutum Meat Packing Corporation and which is also located near the meat laboratory in Brgy. Glamang is met by the Sec. Yap along with local officials and private sectors.

They will evaluate the facilities of hog farms, farm inspection system implemented by the government, good husbandry practices, cleaning, disinfecting, biosecurity measures and the animal traceability.

DA-12 Regional Executive Director Abusama Alid said the laboratory's establishment has the full support of private hog growers in the province, with the South Cotabato Swine Producers Association donating the 1,500 square meter lot.

He said the facility have the capability to conduct microbial analysis, chemical level analysis, veterinary drug residue analysis, and other meat-related examination and inspection.

Regional Agriculture Director Abusama Alid said the department expects the pork meat export to enhance the growth of the swine industry in the area.

"With a successful penetration of the Singaporean market, demand for pigs would eventually surge," he predicted.

South Cotabato Governor Daisy Avance Fuentes together with Polomolok mayor Isidro Lumayag and Gen. Santos City Mayor Pedro Acharon Jr. expressed optimism that the facility will likewise generate more jobs and opportunities to the province and the city as businessmen would surely invest in livestock.

In related development, Yap led the mechanized planting of corn using a tractor (with corn planter and fertilizer applicator) at Barangay Polunoling in Tupi, also in South Cotabato.

In his speech with the farmers, Yap emphasized that aside from rice, corn should also be given attention since it is also staple to many especially those in the Visayas and Mindanao region. Corn is not only for human consumption but also feeds for livestock and poultry production. Corn is very vital for the livestock industry because it is the main ingredient for feeds.

Yap is happy to note that Mt. Matutum Hybrid Corn Trading Center is now expanding its area to 5,000 hectares. This he said is another development in the corn and livestock industry and to complement, the government is putting up a corn processing and trading center to cater the post harvest operations and marketing needs of the farmers here.

Here in South Cotabato, I am assured that the farmers here are taken cared of because Governor Daisy Avance Fuentes is very pro-agriculture. I also need the help of the mayors, municipal agricultural officials down to the agricultural technicians because they are the frontliners in implementing the programs and projects of the agriculture department. Let us help each other, Sec. Yap explained.

Gov. Fuentes proudly announced that the DA-NABCOR Corn Post Harvest Processing and Trading Center has a great impact on farmers and encouraged farmers to treat it as a gift from the government. This is one of the government initiatives that I salute of, said Fuentes.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 06, 2008, 12:43:24 PM
Monday, August 04, 2008Print This Page
Philippine Producers Go to DA for Help
THE PHILIPPINES - Swine producers in South Cotabato have urged the Department of Agriculture (DA) for funding assistance that would expand accredited piggeries output by 20 percent as Mindanao gears to the looming shipment of cut pork meat products to Singapore.

BOOK SHOP
Gaining the Edge in Pork and Poultry Production
 
A refrigerated container van of cut pork meat products is set to be shipped to Singapore soon, the first foreign foray for the country's swine industry.

Emilio V. Escobillo Jr., president of South Cotabato Swine Producers Association, said they are targeting to capture around 25 percent of the Singaporean demand for pork meat products without hurting the domestic market.

"That's why participating farms need the necessary funding for expansion of swine farms to meet our target in Singapore. We are asking the help of the Department of Agriculture to meet the goal," he said.

According to Sun Star, Singapore's daily pork meat requirement reportedly reaches 4,000 per day or 120,000 heads a month.

But Escobillo said that Mindanao could only so far supply about five percent or 6,000 heads a month to Singapore to avoid shortage in the domestic market.

He noted that Singapore is strict on the no anti-biotic requirement of pork meat products, but that participating swine farms are complying with the standards, including adhering to traceability system that shall determine culpability.

Abusama M. Alid, regional Agriculture director, urged the swine producers to submit proposals for expansion project before the agency, as he noted that the country is now ready for the pilot pork shipment to Singapore.

Alid cited that the Agriculture department has been assisting the swine industry in South Cotabato, Sarangani and General Santos City area to boost trade ties with foreign markets.

One of the interventions of the agency is the construction of a P50-million meat laboratory that was inaugurated last week by Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap, he added.

In May, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore accredited Matutum Meat as the only processor of cut pork meat products in the Philippines allowed to ship in the island state.

"We hope to penetrate other markets in Asia now that we are accredited by Singapore," said Stephen G. Castillo, Matutum Meat general manager, stressing that Singapore's standards serve as the barometer to prick other markets in the Asian region.

Matutum Meat is one of two Mindanao firms earlier identified by the Agriculture department to pioneer the country's venture in the foreign pork market. The other one is the Davao City-based Nenita's Quality Foods Corp.

Nenita's, however, has not been yet cleared by Singapore to supply it with cut pork products.

Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap has originally targeted the nation's foreign pork shipment to take place in July 2007 after announcing the development earlier in the year.

Matutum Meat, a sister company of Cebu-based Sunpride Foods Inc. which produces Holiday corned beef and Sunpride canned goods, has invested around P200 million for its state-of-the-art processing plant in Polomolok town, about 15 minutes from this city.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 07, 2008, 10:25:55 AM
Tuesday, August 05, 2008Print This Page
Breeding Pigs Leave UK for the Philippines
UK - The first consignment of breeding pigs since foot-and-mouth stopped all exports of breeding animals last autumn, has been exported to Asia by JJ Genetics, of Caxton, Cambridge.


Forty-four pigs have been sent to the Co family's Edward Agri Farms Corp, in the Philippines.

Edward, Enrique Jnr and Eugene Co came to England to select breeding stock from the Large White, Welsh and Duroc herds of JJ Genetics.

Enrique manages a nucleus herd of 250 sows which supplies the breeding stock for his family’s commercial farms as well as for other commercial units in the area.

The commercial herds, totalling 2,700 sows, are based on maternal Large White cross Welsh females and terminal sires using a combination of terminal Large Whites, Duroc and Pietrain.

Eugene has been impressed with the mothering ability of the Welsh pigs and exceptional growth rate if the Large White and needed to import new stock to improve his existing Welsh and Large White lines.

This imported stock will up date the existing JJ Genetics stock imported 12 years ago. Enrique Jnr reports he is pleased with the stock he has imported and with the way the pigs have settled in the Philippines. He has ordered another shipment from JJ Genetics for delivery in February.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 07, 2008, 10:31:57 AM
, July 24, 2008Print This Page
Buffalo Imports Threaten Philippine Livestock
PHILIPPINES - A decision made by the Philippines Department of Agriculture to open the market to buffalo meat importation may adversely effect the rest of the livestock industry, whilst also posing a serious threat of disease.



According to the Manila Bulletin, the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI) and the Philippine Association of Meat Processing Inc. (PAMPI) are opposing a DA administrative order which is allowing food chains and hotel and restaurant businesses to import their own table-grade buffalo meat needs.

First, allowing the importation of buffalo meat from India will threaten health of the livestock sector.

"We’re just done with our battle against FMD (foot and mouth disease), and here is an order contradictory to it. The OIE (Office International des Epizooties) has not yet certified India as foot and mouth disease-free," said NFHFI chairman Gabriel Uy in an interview.

The Manila Bulletin reported that a PAMPI officer said that the DA regulation will be very hard to monitor so that buffalo meat can definitely find its way to the local wet market and thus dampen local hog price to the detriment of the hog sector.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 12, 2008, 11:45:36 AM
Monday, August 11, 2008Print This Page
Mindanao producers seek help to meet export target
PHILIPPINES - Swine producers in South Cotabato have asked the Department of Agriculture (DA) for funding assistance to expand accredited piggery output by 20 percent as the region gears up to for the export of cut pork meat products to Singapore.

 A refrigerated container van of cut pork meat products is set to be shipped to Singapore soon, the first foreign foray for the country's swine industry reports the Sun Star.

Emilio V. Escobillo Jr., president of South Cotabato Swine Producers Association, said they are targeting to capture around 25 percent of the Singaporean demand for pork meat products without hurting the domestic market.

"That's why participating farms need the necessary funding for expansion of swine farms to meet our target in Singapore. We are asking the help of the Department of Agriculture to meet the goal," he said.

Singapore's daily pork meat requirement reportedly reaches 4,000 head per day - up to 120,000 head a month.

But Escobillo said that Mindanao could only so far supply about five percent or 6,000 heads a month to Singapore to avoid shortage in the domestic market.

He noted that Singapore is strict on the no antibiotic requirement of pork meat products, but that participating swine farms are complying with the standards, including adhering to traceability system that shall determine culpability.

Abusama M. Alid, regional Agriculture director, urged the swine producers to submit proposals for expansion project before the agency, as he noted that the country is now ready for the pilot pork shipment to Singapore.

Escobillo expressed optimism that Singapore's acceptance of the country's pork meat will open the doors to other foreign markets in the Asian region.

In May, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore accredited Matutum Meat as the only processor of cut pork meat products in the Philippines allowed to ship in the island state.

"We hope to penetrate other markets in Asia now that we are accredited by Singapore," said Stephen G. Castillo, Matutum Meat general manager, stressing that Singapore's standards serve as the barometer to prick other markets in the Asian region.

Matutum Meat is one of two Mindanao firms earlier identified by the Agriculture department to pioneer the country's venture in the foreign pork market. The other one is the Davao City-based Nenita's Quality Foods Corp. which is still working on receiving accreditation.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 14, 2008, 08:12:25 AM
Wednesday, August 13, 2008Print This Page
San Miguel Profit Trebled
PHILIPPINES - San Miguel Corp. profit jumped by a factor of three in first half of the year. Feeds delivered "solid performance" while higher live pig market prices allowed SMPF-Vietnam's piggery operations to post significant improvement.



A report in Manila Times says this profit was supported mainly by income from its beer and food operations.

South-east Asia's biggest food and beverage company disclosed its half-year results to the Philippine Stock Exchange.

The company said its net income reached 19.7 billion pesos (PHP) in the first semester as its total revenues went up by 9 per cent to PHP79.8 billion after businesses led by its beer subsidiary registered steady volume and revenue growth.

The end-June profit was 199 per cent higher than in the same period a year ago. Profit growth boosters included savings of PHP5.67 billion from discontinued operations in the first quarter, non-recurring gains from San Miguel Brewery Inc.'s initial public offering and the sale of San Miguel's stake in KSA Realty.

"Faced with challenging economic conditions affecting consumer spending behavior and escalating input costs, we're particularly encouraged by these results," said Ramon Ang, San Miguel president and chief operating officer, pointing to growth "achieved across almost all of our reporting segments in the first six months of 2008."

Mr Ang said to drive volumes in San Miguel food and beverage businesses, the company continues to expand brand availability into new consumption occasions and across the expanding network of outlets.

"We've also put in place several cost saving and productivity initiatives to meet near-term profitability challenges," he added.

During the period, the company's consolidated operating income increased by 28 percent to PHP8.21 billion year-on-year. Profit from continuing operations during the period was significantly higher at PHP14.5 billion than last year.

Volumes of San Miguel Brewery Inc. rose 7 percent as revenues of PHP23.8 billion were 9 percent higher than last year. Operating income for the first semester reached PHP7.16 billion, a 25-percent growth from previous year.

San Miguel's international beer operations ended the first half with overall volumes growing 4 per cent and revenues 30 per cent to $136 million. Volumes were strongest in Indonesia and Thailand and in San Miguel Brewing International Ltd’s export business.

Ginebra San Miguel's volume, meanwhile, grew 16 per cent on growth from gin and brandy. Net income was PHP243 million, 5 per cent higher than last year, while revenue grew 17 per cent year-on-year.

Despite unprecedented commodity and fuel price increases, San Miguel's Food Group under San Miguel Pure Foods Co. delivered consolidated revenue of PHP33.7 billion, 16 per cent higher than last year.

Feeds and poultry delivered solid performances and coffee turned in better margins. The Food Group's income from operations ended at PHP1.26 billion, 7 per cent higher than last year on account of stronger poultry volumes and contained fixed operating expenses, while higher live pig market prices allowed SMPF-Vietnam's piggery operations to post significant improvement.

San Miguel Yamamura Packaging Group posted operating income of PHPP758 million, a 156 per cent rise year on year, while revenue increased 8 per cent to PHP10.1 billion due to stronger sales in plastics and glass.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 30, 2008, 10:36:50 AM
Friday, August 29, 2008Print This Page
Vaccination for Swine Diseases to be Launched
THE PHILIPPINES - The Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) has announced the launch of a P30 million massive vaccination program to stop the outbreak of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PPRS) and other emerging swine diseases in Central Luzon.



The DA will also provide feed subsidies to complement an ongoing stock dispersal program to help the sector recover from a growth slump in the first semester.

The livestock subsector contracted 3.33% in the first semester of 2008, with hog production suffering a decline of 4.33% during the period owing to an outbreak of swine in Central Luzon, reports GMA News.

In a statement, Bureau of Animal Industry Director Dave Catbagan said the subsidy program for the hog industry will be carried out in Central Luzon and Calabarzon (Cavite-Laguna-Batangas-Rizal-Quezon), which will involve assisting backyard raisers acquire healthy piglets and their required animal feeds.

The DA will also include in its rehabilitation package for the livestock sector animal health programs and laboratory services, Catbagan said.

The stock dispersal program, which has been going on will go full blast next month, Catbagan said.

The feed subsidy program aims to grow hogs by at least an additional 10 kilograms to 15 kilograms to increase output from the national average of only 77 kilograms.

As part of measures to assist the hog growers, BAI and the National Meat Inspection Service will finalize plans to complement the meat inspection laboratories set up in General Santos City and Polomolok in South Cotabato .

Catbagan said he was optimistic that a bright future lies ahead for the Philippine hog industry, with local producers soon to ship pork cuts to Singapore after complying with the island-state’s stringent requirements, including an assurance that these pork items are free from banned drugs and veterinary drug residues.

He said Singapore’s Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority recently accredited the Matutum Meat Packing Corporation in Polomok, South Cotabato as the sole processor of pork exports to that country.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 11, 2008, 07:47:15 AM
Thursday, September 04, 2008Print This Page
PROVET Launches 'Piglet Restocking Program'
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA), through the Regional Field Units (RFUs) and in coordination with the Office of the Provincial Veterinarian recently launched the "Piglet Restocking Program" in selected municipality/barangay beneficiaries the Antique province.



The objective of this program is to increase pork production in Regions III, IV-A and Regions V and VI to be able to meet the demand in Metro Manila calculated to be realizable and to reach the consuming public just in time for Christmas season.

Accordingly, this program was undertaken to cushion the impact of pork shortage in Metro Manila, as a result of great pork inventory losses suffered by Regions III and IV-A when an outbreak of animal diseases hit their swine industry last year.

In like manner, neither Regions II, IV-B and V could sufficiently support pork to Metro Manila, because they too experienced a drop in pork production during the prior years.

Meanwhile, out of 181 beneficiaries allotted for the province of Antique, partial deliveries were already made among the municipalities of Patnongon, Barbaza and Tibiao equally receiving 20 piglets each through piglet subsidy at the cost of P1,000.00 per piglet. These shall be distributed at a minimum of two piglets per swine raisers.

It was learned that this program is to continue until the objective will have been achieved and also when the top pork producing regions supplying pork in Metro Manila will have recovered from their losses in the swine industry.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008Print This Page
First Batch of Restocking Piglets Received
THE PHILIPPINES - Being the first beneficiaries of the Department of Agriculture's (DA) Piglet Restocking Program, the provinces of Antique and Iloilo received a total of 730 piglets.



The DA regional field unit 6 (DA-RFU 6) information division disclosed that the total number of piglets released to the two provinces were 590 in Iloilo and 140 in Antique, writes Adelaida Bulaon.

The office said the delivery for other provinces are scheduled in the next succeeding weeks subject to the availability of stocks.

The DA central office has identified Western Visayas as one of the five regions in the country to implement the program that aims to provide sufficient supply of pork to Metro Manila during the last quarter of the year and address the market requirement this Christmas season.

DA regional executive director for Western Visayas Larry Nacionales said the department through the Livestock Development Council (LDC) has allocated P4,526,000 for piglet subsidy to identified livestock raisers in the region.

A total of 2,263 heads will be released to the identified beneficiaries in the region to include 414 heads in Aklan; 362 heads in Antique; 496 in Capiz; 262 in Guimaras; 1,582 in Iloilo and 1,410 heads in Negros Occidental.

The beneficiaries were identified by the DA RFU 6 in coordination with the provincial and municipal officials of the recipient provinces.

It is expected that an estimated volume of 407,340 metric tons or 19,400 heads at 90 kilograms per head will be produced out of the program, Nacionales said.

Under the program, the DA will provide piglet subsidy of P1,000/piglet at a maximum of two piglets per swine raiser.

Other participating regions are Central Luzon, Southern Tagalog (Regions IV A and B), and Bicol Region.

The sites were identified because of their proximity to Metro Manila and availability of stocks present in the areas.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008Print This Page
First Batch of Restocking Piglets Received
THE PHILIPPINES - Being the first beneficiaries of the Department of Agriculture's (DA) Piglet Restocking Program, the provinces of Antique and Iloilo received a total of 730 piglets.



The DA regional field unit 6 (DA-RFU 6) information division disclosed that the total number of piglets released to the two provinces were 590 in Iloilo and 140 in Antique, writes Adelaida Bulaon.

The office said the delivery for other provinces are scheduled in the next succeeding weeks subject to the availability of stocks.

The DA central office has identified Western Visayas as one of the five regions in the country to implement the program that aims to provide sufficient supply of pork to Metro Manila during the last quarter of the year and address the market requirement this Christmas season.

DA regional executive director for Western Visayas Larry Nacionales said the department through the Livestock Development Council (LDC) has allocated P4,526,000 for piglet subsidy to identified livestock raisers in the region.

A total of 2,263 heads will be released to the identified beneficiaries in the region to include 414 heads in Aklan; 362 heads in Antique; 496 in Capiz; 262 in Guimaras; 1,582 in Iloilo and 1,410 heads in Negros Occidental.

The beneficiaries were identified by the DA RFU 6 in coordination with the provincial and municipal officials of the recipient provinces.

It is expected that an estimated volume of 407,340 metric tons or 19,400 heads at 90 kilograms per head will be produced out of the program, Nacionales said.

Under the program, the DA will provide piglet subsidy of P1,000/piglet at a maximum of two piglets per swine raiser.

Other participating regions are Central Luzon, Southern Tagalog (Regions IV A and B), and Bicol Region.

The sites were identified because of their proximity to Metro Manila and availability of stocks present in the areas.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 18, 2008, 11:07:55 AM
Swine Raising for Meat Production In the Philippines
Roundworm infection
Roundworm infection is caused by the bacterial agent scientifically known as Ascaris lumbricoides. Symptoms of this disease depends heavily on the number of worms present in the pigs, management and nutrition of the animals. Pigs infected with this disease demonstrate a slow growth rate, thinness, thick and dull hair growth. Pigs may expel worms through vomit or feces.

This disease may be treated by oral administration of a de-wormer through fees or drinking water. Piperazine dewormers are effective treatment of this disease.

Swine dysentery
Swine Dysentery is caused by the bacteria Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. This disease is common to pigs at weight twelve to 75 kg. Severe cases sometimes occur in sows and their sucking piglets. The bacteria associated with these diseases causes a severe inflammation of the large intestine with dysentery or bloody mucus diarrhea.

This disease is characterized by loss of appetite, fever, weakness, rough coat and watery feces spotted with blood or mucus.

Twitching of the tail, slight reddening of the skin, sunken eyes and dehydration may also be observed. Sudden death may occur in heavy finisher pigs.

Antibiotics in feed for two weeks may be used to treat this disease. New arrivals should be quarantined for seven days and fed high level antibiotics to prevent this disease.

Costs and marketing
Important factors should be considered before venturing into the swine raising enterprise.

A backyard operation requires investments in housing facility with a concrete floor that is livable for hogs, and a viable and healthy seed stock. The backyard operation also requires operation expenses such as feeds, veterinary services, medication and supplements. Livestock insurance is also a n operation expense to be considered.

Large scale operations require fixed investments that include hog houses, facilities and equipment. Required hog houses are farrowing houses or stalls, a gilt/dry/gestating stall, a boar house, a weaning house, a growing/fattening house and an isolation house. Equipment investments for a large-scale operation include water pumps, electrical connections, hammer will, feed mixer, hog scales, and other farm and sanitation equipment. Stock investment are sows or gilts and boars. Large-scale operation expenses are on hog feeds, veterinary services and medication, vitamin supplements, repair and maintenance of buildings and maintenance of machinery and equipment.

Hogs are marketed at weight of 8o kg. There are three ways to market finishing pigs: through a middleman, direct marketing, or auction marketing. Middlemen act as buying or selling agents. Direct marketing to meat processors may be done without the sue of middlemen. Auctioning at a market may also be done where animals are sold to buyers with the highest acceptable price per kilo liveweight or per head. It is important to scout the market for the most viable marketing type in the area before starting a hog farm.

Proper shipment and transport of the pigs should be observed when marketing a large number of hogs. This minimizes losses caused by shrinkage, bruises, injuries and possible deaths.

Large animals should be separated from smaller pigs by a partition. Loading facilities should be provided to proper loading of animals. Beddings of sand and saw dust should be provided when necessary. These beddings should be wet down before loading top keep the animals cool and comfortable in hot weather. Transport vehicles should not be over crowded or over loaded. Hogs should be protected from stress and excitement and should be given enough rest before they are butchered. The animals should not be overfed before transport to prevent vomiting or suffocation.

Record keeping is a key tool in a successful operation and marketing. Record keeping must be kept simple and precise as this can be used for improvements and adjustments to achieve the maximum profitability of the farm and successful daily farm operation.

The two types of records are economical and technical. Economical records refer to the financial side of the operation. This record includes price of meat, price of weanlings and price of feed. Technical records are production and farm schedule. This includes age of sow, farrowing dates, and number of piglets.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 18, 2008, 11:12:09 AM
Updates on Pig Nutrition
A well-renowned international animal nutrition expert share his expertise to the Filipino commercial hog raisers.

The recent technical forum on “Feeding the Prolific Sow to Maximize its Genetic Potential” and “Feeding Strategies to Optimize the Performance of Piglets” sponsored by SARIMANOK HEALTH AND NUTRITION COMPANY (makers of Sure Value Veterinary PIGROLOC HOG FEEDS) last May 22 reconfirmed what animal nutritionists have been saying about sow feeding-that it need not be a laborious task. In fact, a basic understanding of nutrition can go a long way in improving the overall health and performance of pigs.

The speaker, Dr. Ken Bryant, an expert in swine nutrition and Senior Vice President of North American Nutrition Companies, Inc. emphasized the following factors that influence sow productivity. These include management, herd health, environment, genetics and nutrition. Focusing his lecture on the latter, the animal nutrition expert says the there are key management practices that is needed in order to improve feed intake. These are provision of ample fresh water; keeping sows comfortable; keeping feeders clean; wetting feeds; feeding more frequently not overfeeding sows in gestation. In their company for example, the outspoken scientist says their research challenge is how to feed each sow to meet her specific nutrient demand at each phase of the reproductive cycle.

Bryant, whose company is considered as one of the most advanced research centers in animal nutrition, also underscored North American Nutrition’s basic animal nutritional philosophy: “minimal nutritional stress after weaning and gradual adaptation to simple diets.” He said the basic features of an effective nursery feeding program should be one which is highly palatable and digestable, uses high quality ingredients, properly fortified to meet requirements and should be positioned correctly.

A significant part of Bryant’s lecture focused on nutrient requirements for starter pigs. He said that all these depend on the weight and age of the pig, the animal’s daily feed intake and environmental stresses. He then went on to discuss the how the digestive enzyme development of pigs changes rapidly during the early post weaning period and that the rate of development is influenced by five factors: age at weaning; health status; environment; management and nutrition.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 28, 2008, 09:18:22 AM
Friday, September 26, 2008Print This Page
Meat Processors Protest Ban on Pork Imports
THE PHILIPPINES - The country’s largest group of meat processors has protested over a ban imposed by the Department of Agriculture (DA) on pork importation, warning that this could affect the supply of meat products in the coming holiday season.



In a statement on Friday, the Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc. (PAMPI) said that it had sent a letter to Secretary Arthur Yap on September 23, requesting for the immediate lifting of the suspension of import applications for pork manufacturing-grade parts.

BusinessWorld reports that last September 16th, Mr. Yap instructed the the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) to suspend the issuance of (veterinary quarantine clearance) VCQ for pork import applications, amid pressures from Congressman Nicanor Brioners and an influential group of hog raisers.

Mr. Briones blamed the presence of imported pork in the wet markets for a large inventory of 50,000 to 60,000 oversized hogs, amid a lack of market demand.

"It is disappointing to note that the DA would unilaterally and immediately react to this allegation without a benefit of consultation on confrontation with importers and processors who are users of imported pork parts," PAMPI said.

The meat processors said the suspension of pork importation took effect without the conduct of a dialogue between PAMPI members and the hog raisers, or the DA and BAI, or among the three parties.

"It is fearful to think that the DA would actually decide to sacrifice the meat processing industry so that you could submit to the pressures that Congressman Briones and the hog raisers have applied upon your department," PAMPI said in their letter to Mr. Yap.

PAMPI claimed that the suspension of VCQ for pork importation has affected the delivery of manufacturing-grade parts needed by the meat processing industry, including pork bellies, fats, offals, and skin/rind.

Data from the BAI that show as of September 13th, pork imports reached 83,454 metric tons, compared to the 12-month importation of 79,381 MT in 2007.

PAMPI said that while the pork import volume this year appeared quite high, this cannot be traced to the importation of manufacturing-grade pork parts.

"Our importation of manufacturing grade pork parts are not unreasonably high compared to 2007 volumes, except for bellies which has become scarce in local supply, forcing us to depend on imported sources to support the increased demand of bacons," PAMPI said.

As of August 30, imports of pork bellies reached 6,503,480 kilos this year, against 3,343,918 kilos in August 2007.

PAMPI said what contributed to the surge in pork importation this year was the increase in the shipments of "cuts".

"We do not believe that the meat processors would be the importers of this category of pork parts," PAMPI said, noting that importation of cuts reached 23,761,236 kilos as of August 2008, against 4,963,011 kilos in August 2007.

"A sweeping control on, or restriction, of all pork imports will be an unfair stance for the meat processors and would challenge the enterprise system in a free economy. The distortion in market behavior of pork prices may have been introduced by the entry of huge volumes of pork cuts," PAMPI said.

PAMPI asked the government to reduce, if not suspend the importation of pork cuts, while allowing the uninterrupted sourcing of manufacturing grade parts for bellies, deboned pork parts, fats, offals, rind/skin, which are substantial raw materials for processed meat products that utilize pork-based formulations.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 11, 2008, 08:37:27 AM
Monday, November 03, 2008Print This Page
Hog Cholera No Threat to Humans
PHILIPPINES - Hog cholera or swine fever affects only pigs and has no detrimental effects on other animals or humans.



However, the potential damages to the pig industry would be severe.

The disease is endemic in Asia, Central and South America, and parts of Europe and Africa. It was believed to have been eradicated in the United Kingdom by 1966. It was eradicated in the United States of America in 1978.

On August 20, 2007, the Department of Agriculture investigated the outbreak of swine flu in Nueva Ecija and Central Luzon prompting the Philippine National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) to raise a hog cholera "red alert" warning over Metro Manila and five regions of Luzon.

The pesti virus almost ruined the backyard piggeries in Bulacan and Pampanga, top hog producers in Central Luzon.

Agriculture officials said it killed at least 500 pigs of the 5,438 infected heads before it was contained.

Hogs stricken with the virus lose their appetite, show signs of diarrhea, and later, constipation and red spots on the skin. It also causes fever, skin lesions, convulsions, and usually (particularly in young animals) death within 15 days.

The acute form of hog cholera is highly virulent, causing persistent fevers that can raise body temperatures to as high as 107°F.

The chronic form of hog cholera causes similar clinical signs in affected swine, but the signs are less severe than in the acute form.

Discoloration of the abdominal skin and red splotches around the ears and extremities often occur. Pigs with chronic hog cholera can live for more than 100 days after the onset of infection.

The mild or clinically inapparent form of hog cholera seldom results in noticeable clinical signs. Affected pigs suffer short periods of illness often followed by periods of recovery. Eventually, a terminal relapse occurs.

The most common method of transmission is direct contact between healthy swine and those infected with hog cholera.

The disease can also be transmitted through contact with body secretions and excrement from infected animals. Healthy pigs coming into contact with contaminated vehicles, pens, feed, or clothing may contract the disease. Birds, flies, and humans can physically carry the virus from infected to healthy swine.

Swine owners can inadvertently cause infection through feeding their herds untreated food wastes containing infected pork scraps.

Sun Star offers some tips on how swine owners can protect their animals:

Check animals at least twice a week for unusual signs or behaviors.
Make sure food waste is properly heated to destroy pathogens.
Isolate newly purchased hogs for at least 21 days.
Isolate sick pigs until the cause of illness is determined.
Fence property to prevent wild pigs from coming in contact with domestic herds.
Practice standard bio-security measures, such as cleaning and disinfecting clothing, equipment, and vehicles entering and leaving the farm.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 11, 2008, 08:41:04 AM
Monday, November 03, 2008Print This Page
DA Assures Consumers of Sufficient Pork Supply
PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) Regional Director Larry Nacionales has assured local consumers that there would be enough supply of pork during the Christmas season.



Nacionales said that although the supply was somehow affected by Typhoon Frank, but then there is still enough for local consumers.

He also said that the region before Typhoon Frank is able to transport 12,000 hogs per month to Manila, Cebu, Dumaguete and Bacolod city.

The director said that the price of live animals is also still quite low at P80-82 per kilo as compared to the price in Metro Manila which is around P140 per kilo.

Balita reports that aside from the local source of hogs, Western Visayas is also getting supplies from other regions that the DA director is confident it will have sufficient supply this Christmas.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 12, 2008, 01:49:54 AM

Retail prices of choice pork items like liempo, pigue and kasim have started to go down in Metro Manila markets from their week-ago rates of as high as P160-P170 per kilo following last Monday’s agreement by major hog industry players and Department of Agriculture (DA) officials to adopt a “reference price” band of P140 to P150 for these prime cuts.

Yesterday morning’s market inspection visits by Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap showed that these choice pork cuts now sell for an average P140 to P145 a kilo, with the retail cost dropping to as low as P135 in some stalls in the Mega Q-Mart, Quezon City.

Aside from this Mega Q-Mart where the lowest retail price was monitored, Yap also instructed DA Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup and Bureau of Animal Industry Director Davinio Catbagan to monitor more markets to check on whether the agreement reached with industry players ranging from producers and meat processors to wholesalers and retailers on a “reference price” during the DA-hosted dialogue had started “to bear fruit.”

Yap expressed optimism that the price drop will boost consumer demand, thus benefiting not only the consumers in the form of cheaper pork items but the producers and traders as well in the form of higher sales and more profits.

He said that, “As agreed upon during the Oct. 6 dialogue at the DA central office, agriculture officials and the hog industry players would be meeting on a regular basis to review the ‘reference price’ accord and to take up other concerns that are meant to ensure the steady supply at reasonable prices of prime pork cuts, especially during the Christmas season.

At the end of the three-hour meeting at the DA last Monday, over 30 industry players in attendance agreed to pull down the cost of prime pork cuts ahead of yuletide by agreeing on a “reference price” ranging from P140 to P150 per kilo of choice cuts.

This reference price band was arrived at during the meeting after DA officials and the private-sector stakeholders had reached a consensus on the reasonable profit margins for growers, wholesalers and retailers.

Market data discussed during the dialogue showed that while the farmgate price ranges from P75 to P88 per kilo, the retail cost now average P140 a kilo for all cuts, but with the price of liempo and other prime cuts reaching as high as P160 to P170 in Metro Manila markets.

Among the industry players present during the DA dialogue were Rene Eleria, chairman of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI); Albert Lim, NFHFI president; Soledad Agbayani, president of the Philippine Association of Hog Raisers Inc. (PAHRI); Dan Gomez, chairman of the Meat Handler and Dealer Association of the Philippines (MHDAP); and Jess Cham, president of the Meat Importers and Trader Association (MITA).

Also present were Jerome Ong, vice president of the Philippine Association of Meat Processor Inc. (PAMPI); Emar Ozaeta, marketing manager of Gemsun Marketing; Rico Geron of the Sorosoro Ibaba Development Corporation; and Rep. Nicanor Briones of  the partylist AGAP.

Ramon Galicia, general manager of the Maypajo Market Multi-Purpose Cooperative; Ruben Tristan Avillanosa, market supervisor of Commonwealth Market; Lorna Valdez, market master of Pritil Market, and other retailer-representatives from different markets in Metro Manila also attended the meeting.

Aside from Yap , the other DA officials who attended the dialogue were Salacup, Catbagan and Director Carlos Mendoza of the Livestock Development Council (LDC).

Prior to Monday’s dialogue, DA officials have already been meeting with hog industry leaders to discuss their concerns over certain issues saddling the livestock subsector, notably the big spread between the farmgate and retail prices of pork cuts.

DA officials have also denied reports of a government ban on meat imports to the Philippines .

Last week, Catbagan was instructed by Yap to directly establish linkages between hog producers and meat processors, to discuss, among other concerns about the domestic supply and pricing of pork items.

Salacup said that plans are being firmed up to link backyard hog growers with meat traders like PAMPI and MITA.

As for reports of a ban on meat imports, Catbagan made it clear last week that there was no such directive issued by the Secretary, adding that Yap had merely asked the DA’s regulatory agencies to review the issuance of import permits for agricultural products as part of the Department’s intensified efforts to curb smuggling.

“There is no ban,” Catbagan said. “The instruction of the Secretary is in view of the alleged rampant smuggling in the hog sector, he instructed the DA regulatory agencies such as the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Bureau of Plant Industry and BAI to review the issuance of import permits to determine if there are lapses.”

He added that, “There was no instruction to suspend the issuance of import permits or  authority for any particular agricultural  product.”

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 13, 2008, 10:39:51 AM
16 October 2008] The Philippine hog industry may find 2009 a bit bleaker as farm prices are expected to decrease by 4-5% due to improved supply and weak consumer spending. Dr Dante Palabrica, head of Universal Robina Corp's Piggery Business Unit, said that while farm prices went to as high as PHP 115 (USD 2.44)/kg in the early part of 2008, this has now dropped to PHP 85 (USD 1.80)/kg. Although prices could pick up again producers should not expect to attain the high prices it enjoyed in the first part of 2008. He said that while production will improve by about 18-20% in 2009,cost could go up to about PHP 90 (USD 1.91)/kg.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 18, 2008, 08:25:42 AM
Monday, November 17, 2008Print This Page
DA Warns of Higher Pork Prices Despite Sufficiency
THE PHILIPPINES - Although a sufficient supply of pork is expected during the holiday season, projected high prices are to be anticipated due to high demand for pork, according to the Department of Agriculture.



According to Balita.org, the DA's regional executive director Larry Nacionales said the price increase is a normal trend that can be felt by consumers up to the first quarter of 2009.

Nacionales said the DA has actually completed its piglet restocking project last month where farmers were given piglets for growing to pre-empt any possible shortage.

Nacionales said live production of swine in the region is huge but processed meats are being supplied outside of the region.

Before typhoon Frank, he said that some 12,000 head of swine were shipped outside of Western Visayas every month.

“We have no problems when it comes to supplies of pork products. We have an inter-regional marketing channel where we can access these products in other regions in case of shortage, likewise we provide them with these commodities should they are in need of the same products,” he explained.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 18, 2008, 12:02:18 PM
Philippine hog raisers urge probe on technical smuggling. Philippine hog raisers are calling on the government to probe the possible technical smuggling of meat products from Canada. They are asking the Department of Agriculture to look into the invoices of meat imports from Canada which may declare meat prices that are higher than the actual price registered in Canada. An industry official said there is an oversupply and if the declared price is higher than the actual price, this amounts to technical smuggling, and may lead to a further drop in the farm price of locally produced hogs, which is now hovering between PHP 70-80 (USD 1.50-1.72)/kg.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 20, 2008, 11:26:26 AM
Price of pork could go up by 20% as the Christmas holiday nears, however processed and canned meat products should be stable. Trade and Industry Secretary Zenaida Maglaya said that should the price of pork go up, it would only go back to PHP 170-180 (USD 3.53-3.74)/kg, adding that there will be no supply problem so that any price increases would be caused by an increase in demand. She also noted that there is adequate supply of processed and canned meat so there should be no price increases, although prices of Christmas ham, a staple on Filipino tables for Christmas, may increase by less than 10%.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 20, 2008, 11:30:35 AM
The Philippine hog industry may find 2009 a bit bleaker as farm prices are expected to decrease by 4-5% due to improved supply and weak consumer spending. Dr Dante Palabrica, head of Universal Robina Corp's Piggery Business Unit, said that while farm prices went to as high as PHP 115 (USD 2.44)/kg in the early part of 2008, this has now dropped to PHP 85 (USD 1.80)/kg. Although prices could pick up again producers should not expect to attain the high prices it enjoyed in the first part of 2008. He said that while production will improve by about 18-20% in 2009,cost could go up to about PHP 90 (USD 1.91)/kg.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: sanico on November 20, 2008, 08:44:34 PM
Hi Mikey,
Do you have also news with regards to feeds cost and medicines for 2009. Right now, fuel prices
are lower but why feeds cost and medicines are still high in the market? Thanks.
Nick
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 21, 2008, 08:45:27 AM
Sanico
Wednesday, November 19, 2008Print This Page
CME: Crude Oil Prices Impact Livestock Production
US - CME's Daily Livestock Report for 18th November 2008.



Notice: As you click on the link below, please find a special notice regarding the start of trading of options on Feeder Cattle futures on the CME Globex trading platform.

Crude oil prices continue to plummet and this remains a bearish influence on grain prices. As the below chart shows, crude oil and corn prices have moved almost in lockstep for the past two years, in large part thanks to the increased linkages between the corn feed and energy sectors.


The ethanol industry remains one of the largest users of US corn stock at this time (estimated at about 32% of overall US corn usage in 2008-09) and this will continue to make the corn markets especially vulnerable to the extreme volatility in the energy market. If the relationship between crude oil and corn is to hold in the short term, one could see corn prices continue to drift further into December.

Reports indicate that current new corn crop sales are very light, possibly indicating that US corn producers are somewhat more bullish on the price outlook for 2009 than the futures market. But, if ethanol and world demand continue to slump, it will be difficult for corn values to maintain any significant rally going forward. The strength of the US currency clearly is a concern as is the weakness in the US livestock industry. Indeed, with all the talk of possibly slumping ethanol demand, it is also important to consider the expected contraction in livestock and poultry production. The latest USDA report indicated that egg sets are currently 11% lower than year ago levels and have declined in double digits for the past two weeks.

If large poultry producers are forced to declare bankruptcy, and possibly liquidate, it could cause significant disruptions in the feed grain markets and put further pressure on grain prices in 2009. As for beef, prices remain under pressure following the decline in equity values and talk about weak beef demand. Feeder cattle contracts were hit especially hard in today’s trading, with futures declining by as much as 265 points (Feb ‘09 contract) and most contracts establishing new life of contract lows. Feeders were pulled lower by the weakness in live cattle futures and did not get much support by lower corn futures. As for hogs, the market traded mixed today but continues to be weighed down by speculation of weakening export sales and uncertain outlook for US supplies in 2009.

Looks like the feed prices maybe somewhat unstable for the year 2009.Corn is in high demand.

mikey
Farmers Feed The World:



















Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 21, 2008, 11:17:24 AM
The Quezon City government has intensified its efforts against the selling of 'hot' or 'double-dead' meat in the cities wet markets following reports that the city's Market Development Administration Department has confiscated more than five tonnes of double-dead pork meat in 10 separate raids between the Cloverleaf and MC markets in the northern part of the city. Mayor Feliciano Belmonte Jr warned scrupulous traders that his government will prosecute those caught engaging in this illegal activity. Earlier this month, authorities caught 230 kg of double-dead pork meat being transported with live hogs in nearby Pasay City.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 21, 2008, 11:31:13 AM
Philippine meat processors have asked the government to scrap the ban on pork imports as this may lead to supply problems during the coming Christmas season. There were reports earlier that Department of Agriculture (DA) Secretary'Arthur Yap ordered the suspension of the issuance of veterinary quarantine clearance (VCQ) for pork import applications, amid pressures from an influential group of hog raisers who said pork imports are flooding the wet markets despite a lack in demand. The group said the suspension of VCQ for pork imports has affected the delivery of manufacturing-grade parts needed by the meat processing industry, including pork bellies, fats, offals, and skin/rind.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 21, 2008, 11:40:46 AM
 The Philippine Department of Agriculture [DA] released the first piglets totaling 730 heads to the provinces of Antique and Iloilo, both of which are in Western Visayas. Western Visayas is one of the five regions identified by the DA to implement a program that aims to provide adequate supply of pork to Metro Manila during the last quarter of the year, especially during the Christmas season. A total of 2,263 heads of piglets will be released to backyard hog farmers in the region. Under the program, the DA will provide a piglet subsidy worth PHP 1,000 (USD 21.43) per piglet, with each raiser getting maximum of two piglets. Other regions that will receive piglets are Central Luzon, Southern Tagalog and the Bicol region.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 25, 2008, 10:28:58 AM
The article says the native pig is thought to be extinct. I wonder how much problems it would be to try and breed it back?(not original, but close to it).

Philippine Native
The Philippine Native pig is either black or black with a white belly. Varieties include Ilocos and Jalajala. The Berkjala, Diani, Kaman, Koronadel and Libtong breeds were all developed from this breed. It is now thought to be extinct.

The breed is very prolific, in average the gilts could exhibit signs of sexual maturity as young as 4 to 5 months. They are have a low feed conversion ratio. Growing swine reach 60 kilos during the 6 to 8 months fattening period. This breed is popular throughout the Philippines in the for Letchon (broiled whole pig).

Reference:

Professor Liwayway H. Acero, Philippines

Mason, I.L. 1996. A World Dictionary of Livestock Breeds, Types and Varieties. Fourth Edition. C.A.B International. 273 pp.

Photographs:

R. E. McDowell, Professor Emeritus of International Animal Science, Cornell University, and provided by Paul O. Brackelsberg, Professor of Animal Science, Iowa State University

 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: nemo on November 25, 2008, 11:43:37 PM
dwindling population but not yet extinct ;D

They say in Ifugao there are still some.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 26, 2008, 10:20:50 AM
I agree Doc.still some around our place plus we own some ourselves.
The native is what one would call a Heritage Breed.Hertiage Breeds are not used in commercial or semi commercial operations usually due to late to mature,(longer growing period).Heritage breeds are still in demand more suitable to a  niche market.
Once the numbers are in a real decline,their value increases.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: nemo on November 26, 2008, 07:49:43 PM
This is another niche market to explore.

And possible also to be a pet if trained/tamed properly. Like the potbellied pigs.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 04, 2008, 10:06:19 AM
Wednesday, December 03, 2008Print This Page
DA: Enough Pork Supply in Bicol During Christmas
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) has assured consumers in Bicol of a stable supply of pork during the Christmas season as it has secured adequate supply commitment from suppliers in Masbate and the neighboring Visayan Islands.



Balita-dot-ph reports that the DA gave the assurance with an expected increase in demand for pork during the holidays as Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve will never be complete without pork, particularly ham.

"There are some speculations on possible pork shortage during the holidays," DA regional director Jose V. Dayao said in a statement.

Dayao said last Tuesday, Crown B Corporation, a commercial farm based in Aroroy, Masbate has delivered 100 heads of hogs to Arrow Meat Shop in Naga City.

He said that this initial delivery will boost the current hog stocks and help stabilize priced of pork for the holiday season.

If necessary, he said DA can source stocks from the Visayas and Mindanao regions to augment the region's stocks to assure enough pork supply.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 07, 2008, 12:02:40 PM
NMIS Intensifies Campaign Against Unsafe Meat
THE PHILIPPINES - To make sure that consumers are eating safe meat, in the coming Christmas season in particular, the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) has started to inspect public markets, slaughterhouses and post-abbatoir operations with the assistance of law enforcement agencies.



Meat agency officer-in-charge Jane Bacayo said they have strengthened partnerships with local government units to implement more effective regulation of the meat industry, by watching closely on the country’s meat processing plants and public markets along with 426 accredited slaughterhouses and more than 1,000 unaccredited slaughterhouses nationwide.

“The NMIS has lately been conducting a lot of ‘post-abbatoir’ operations where it was able to confiscate some nine metric tons combined of ‘hot’ or double-dead meat in several markets in Metro Manila, in coordination with the National Bureau of Investigation [NBI] and the Criminal Investigation and Detection Group of the Philippine National Police,” Bacayo said in a report to Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap.

Bacayo said the operations led to the filing of criminal cases against 10 people for selling unsafe pork and chicken from January to August alone.

The Manila Times reports that while the Bureau of Animal Industry has jurisdiction over animals transported from farms to slaughterhouses, it is the job of the Meat agency to oversee all industry-related activities from slaughterhouses to the markets.

Because of this, the NMIS has the mandate to confiscate all meat and meat products that have not passed the standards set by the agency, Bacayo explained.

“So after we catch people selling double-dead meat, we file cases against them for violation of the Consumer Act of the Philippines,” Bacayo added.

The Meat official further said that market inspection work is being done all year round. However, the Meat agency’s operations are stepped up during the last quarter because unsafe or hot meat is “most prevalent from August to December, when the changes in the weather make animals and poultry less resistant and more susceptible to diseases.”

The Meat agency always conduct seminars and advocacy campaigns on food safety, trying to convince local governments to do their share in the food safety campaign of the government.

Bacayo said that alongside food safety seminars and advocacy campaigns for local governments, the Meat agency has also been extending financial assistance to municipalities for the improvement of their slaughterhouses, through grants on a counterpart arrangement.

Helping local governments improve their meat processing facilities actually falls under a new project of the agency, which is the Meat Establishment Improvement Program.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 12, 2008, 08:42:07 AM
Thursday, December 11, 2008Print This Page
Filipino Hogs Found Positive for Ebola Virus
THE PHILIPPINES - Hogs in four Philippine piggery farms have been found positive for Ebola Reston virus, the Department of Health (DoH) and Department of Agriculture (DA) reported yesterday.



As of yesterday evening, Ebola Reston cases were confirmed in four farms in Luzon, the northern Philippines, after six out of 28 hogs tested positive for the virus.

Arthur Yap, Secretary of the Department of Agriculture, allayed fears that the disease will be transferred to humans from infected hogs, Philippine TV network GMA News reported.

There has been no documented case on the virus being transmitted from hogs to humans, said the agriculture chief.

"This is an animal health problem and not a human issue," Yap said.

Yap added that most of the hog samples that were tested yesterday yielded negative results.

Meanwhile, he advised the public that pork meat should be properly cleaned and thoroughly cooked before they are eaten.

"The WHO (World Health Organization) said that the meat should be thoroughly cooked because the heat could kill the virus. The meat should likewise be properly handled and washed," Yap said.

On Thursday, the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) set up "hog checkpoints" to prevent the transport of pigs from four piggery farms in Luzon for slaughter or breeding.

Soledad Agbayani, president of the Philippine Association of Hog Farmers, likewise said the Ebola Reston virus was not harmful to humans.

"The virus is not harmful to humans but to be sure, make sure the meat you eat is not 'double dead'," Agbayani told a local radio.

Meanwhile, the Department of Agriculture has issued a ban on pork exports to other countries.

The government was planning to export choice pork cuts to Singapore early next year.

Ebola-Reston, a sub-type of the Ebola, was first discovered in 1989 from crab-eating macaques originating in the Philippines. Reportedly, it is non-pathogenic to humans and is only mildly fatal to monkeys.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 13, 2008, 10:09:31 AM
Friday, December 12, 2008Print This Page
Hog Checkpoints Set Up Amid Ebola Scare
THE PHILIPPINES - The National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) on Thursday said it has intensified its meat inspection efforts following the discovery of hogs in at least three piggery farms in Luzon tested positive for ebola reston virus.



NMIS Director Jane Bacayo said he has ordered strict monitoring of slaughterhouses all over the country.

He also directed its personnel to properly screen the requirements being submitted by hog dealers for the issuance of health certificates.

On the other hand, Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) director Dave Catbagan said they have set up "hog checkpoints" to prevent the transport of pigs from the infected piggery farms in Luzon for slaughter or breeding.

He said they already coordinated with local government officials of the provinces concerned to prevent such transports.

"Walang makalalabas, na-coordinate na natin mula pa kagabi sa governors at mayors. May nagbabantay doon na mobile police (Pigs from those farms will not get out. We already coordinated with mayors and governors concerned. Police will set up checkpoints to make sure pigs from the infected farms will not get out)," he said.

"I'm assuring the public walang makakalabas na baboy (no pigs will be allowed to be brought out of the farms concerned) for slaughter and breeding," he added.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 31, 2008, 06:05:26 AM
Tuesday, December 30, 2008Print This Page
DA to Seek FMD-free Certification for Luzon
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) will submit documents to world animal health authorities to have Luzon certified as free of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and lead to the declaration of the Philippines as an FMD-free country.



Luzon is the only area in the country that has not yet been declared by the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE) or World Organization for Animal Health as FMD-free, Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) officials said.

BAI Director Davinio Catbagan said that OIE already declared as FMD-free the entire Mindanao in May 2001, and Masbate, Palawan, and the entire Visayas in the same month the following year.

Mr Catbagan said the DA is confident that the issue on the Ebola Reston virus, which was earlier detected in a few hogs in two swine farms in Luzon, would not affect the Philippines’ bid to secure a clean bill of health from the OIE, considering that the government has been fully transparent and decisive in dealing with this animal health concern.

"We have exerted extra efforts to make sure that we deal with the Reston issue in a transparent and responsible manner, which is why DA is optimistic that the OIE will act positively on our application for FMD-free status," Catbagan said.

DA acted on the Reston case by placing the two affected farms under quarantine, according to Manila Bulletin Online.

As an additional precaution, the farm handlers and the butchers in the slaughterhouses where the animals are usually brought, were tested, for the non-pathogenic virus.

All the tests conducted on human samples yielded negative for the presence of the Reston virus, Mr Catbagan said.

DA is continuously monitoring the movement of animals and pork meat and has imposed stringent requirements in the issuance of health certifications on animal shipments, he said.

In a report to Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap, Catbagan said DA aims to secure OIE certification for most of Luzon as FMD-free "without vaccination," and the regions of Central Luzon and Calabarzon (Cavite-Laguna-Batangas-Rizal-Quezon) as FMD-free areas with vaccination.

Mr Catbagan pointed out that the Philippines has not had an FMD outbreak in nearly three years.

"Our papers are complete so we are now looking at the possibility of submitting our application to certify Luzon as FMD-free as well depending on the timetable of the OIE," he said.

He said BAI would submit the paper requirements next month, in time for the meeting of the OIE’s Scientific Commission within the first two months of next year.

The last case of FMD was reported in Lucban, Quezon on 28 December, 2005.

FMD is a highly contagious viral disease that strikes cloven-hoofed animals.

Reildrin Morales, the deputy head of the FMD National Task Force, said the OIE has asked the government on sanitary checks on swill feeding in backyard farms. Most of backyard hog farmers who use swill either cook it or just add it to livestock feeds, he noted.

"They thought that most hogs from backyard farms feed on swill so we conducted a national survey to scientifically answer their questions," Morales said.

Backyard farming accounts for 73 projects of the country’s hog production.

Morales said the OIE also asked the BAI about controls on hog transport between areas where vaccination is practiced and the areas that are less stringent on this requirement.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 01, 2009, 03:43:13 AM
Wednesday, December 31, 2008Print This Page
Health Ministry Warns Against Philippine Pork
BRUNEI - Brunei's Ministry of Health and Agriculture Department, Ministry of Industry and Primary Resources have reported that the number of pigs carrying the Ebola-Reston virus in the Philippines have been increasing and has issued a precaution to the public.

Borneo Bulletin reports that in a press release by the Health Ministry, it cited reports from the International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN) and the World Health Organisation (WHO), that the Philippines Veterinary Services have reported to the Food and Agriculture Organisation, the World Organisation for Animal Health and WHO, that a rise on the Ebola-Reston virus has been detected in pigs in the Philippines.

There has also recently been an increase of pigs, in a number of farms in three provinces in the Philippines, carrying the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), with deaths reported in recent months due to the Ebola-Reston virus.

An official notification was made and released earlier by the World Organisation for Animal Health, but to date, there have been no known human infections from the virus.

The Department of Agriculture confirms that Brunei does not import raw pork, frozen or chilled from the Philippines. However, processed pork products are currently being imported into the country in small numbers, according to importation records from the Food Quality and Safety Control Section, Environmental Sanitation Health Section, Ministry of Health.

As a precaution, the Ministry of Health and Department of Agriculture has stated that it would assist and ensure that raw meat and processed pork products from the Philippines will not be sold in the market or imported to Brunei for the mean time.

They have also advised importers and businesses to remove all pork products dating back six months from the market and to submit them to the Food Quality and Safety Control Section or any health office nationwide to be destroyed.

Consumers in possession of raw pork, frozen or chilled, from the Philippines are also requested to surrender them to the Animal Quarantine Unit, Department of Agriculture of any agriculture department nationwide, whilst those in possession of processed pork are to return them to their place of purchase or to the Food Quality and Safety Control Section or to any health office
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 08, 2009, 08:04:13 AM
Wednesday, January 07, 2009Print This Page
Virus in Filipino Pigs May Pose Human Risk
PHILIPPINES - Animal and health experts have said they were conducting an investigation in the Philippines to determine whether the Ebola Reston virus recently discovered in pigs poses a threat to human health.


International Herald Tribune reports that about a dozen experts from the United Nations (UN), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) were invited to Manila to help the government investigate the virus, first identified in October in the northern Philippines.

The discovery not only marked the first time the virus has been found outside of monkeys, but also the first time it has been found in swine, a food-producing animal.

Those factors make the mission "particularly important," said a joint statement by the investigating organizations.

"We hope to identify the risks certainly for animal health and human health, if there are any," said Dr Juan Lubroth of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization and head of the Manila mission.

Ebola's three other subtypes — the Zaire, Sudan and Cote d'Ivoire strains — can cause deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, according to WHO.

The 10-day research mission, which started on 6 January, will focus on the source of the virus, how it is transmitted, its virulence, its natural habitat, and the best way to identify it, the experts told International Herald Tribune.

The Ebola Reston virus was discovered in October while tests were being conducted on samples from pigs that had died of another swine disease at two farms in the northern Philippines.

Philippine Health Secretary, Francisco Duque III, said the two farms in northern Bulacan and Pangasinan provinces, which have nearly 10,000 pigs, are under quarantine.

Tests in late December on pig samples from the farms were negative for the virus, and no pigs have died of the disease or shown any signs of illness, he said. Bureau of Animal Industry Director Davinio Catbagan said the foreign team would verify the results with the slaughter of about 140 pigs.

"If we do not see the virus on these tissue samples, we can decide to lift the quarantine, and later on (proceed) to a wider surveillance," Mr Duque said, according to International Herald Tribune.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 10, 2009, 03:33:21 AM
Thursday, January 08, 2009Print This Page
Vet Sounds Warning Against Ebola Reston Virus
THE PHILIPPINES - The Office of the City Veterinarian in Zambo City recently warned the public against the so-called Ebola Reston strain virus among pigs.



As a precautionary measure, the Office of the City Veterinarian is presently coordinating with leading government agencies such as the Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, Office of the City Agriculturist, City Health Office and other offices for updates.

To date, there is still no report of any pig infected with the strain virus.

Meanwhile, the public is advised that it is safe to eat pork provided the meat is duly certified, properly handled and thoroughly cooked. Bringing the food to a boiling point to make sure that the core of the meat reaches 70°C will kill the virus.

For meat and poultry, the public is advised to make sure that the juices are clear, not pink.

Food handlers and the public are likewise advised to follow the key rules of food safety as provided by the WHO:

Keep clean
Separate raw and cooked food
Cook thoroughly
Keep food at safe temperature
Use safe water and select fresh food
The City Mayor's Office also advised the consumers to buy meat only from meat registered and licensed by the city government and meat having inspected and accompanied by meat inspection certificate by the meat inspectors.

Hog farmers and animal caretakers are also encouraged to report unusual sickness and deaths among pigs to the Office of the City Veterinarian.

"The Office regards this with great importance since this is an animal health issue," the mayor added.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 10, 2009, 03:35:16 AM
Friday, January 09, 2009Print This Page
Government Team Helping Out with Reston Study
THE PHILIPPINES - The government has formed a local team to assist a visiting group of international human and animal health experts carry out a 10-day epidemiological investigation into the re-emergence of the Ebola Reston virus that was detected in a few hogs in two farms in Bulacan and Pangasinan late last year, the Department of Agriculture (DA) said yesterday.



Bureau of Animal Industry Director Davinio Catbagan, who heads the DA's Crisis Management Team (CMT) on the Ebola Reston virus, said the local counterpart team comprise BAI Assistant Director Victor Atienza, Dr Samuel Animas of the BAI-Animal Health Division; and BAI officials Dr Emelinda Lopez, Dr Laarni Cabantac, Dr Rubina Cresencio, Dr Ma Gracia Flores, Dr Magdalena Cruz, Dr Rachel Azul, Dr Reildrin Morales and Marites Gealone.

Atienza is also the assistant manager of the CMT, while Animas heads the Department's Crisis Management Center on the Ebola Reston virus, which has proven to be not harmful to humans.

A team from the Department of Health (DOH) completes the local counterpart group that will assist the international experts from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) or World Animal Health Organization in conducting the epidemiological study aimed at finding out the extent and possible source of the Reston virus and of other virulent swine diseases such as the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) and Circovirus.

The 15-man team of international experts, which is led by Juan Lubroth of the FAO, includes: Dr Carolyn Benigno, Veterinary Epidemiologist, Dr Kate Glynn, Risk Assessment Specialist (OIE), Dr William White, FAO/seconded from USDA), Mr Mario Musa, International Consultant (Crisis Communication), Ms Elizabeth Christy, International Consultant (Operations) Dr Romeo Gundran, National Consultant (Veterinary Epidemiology), Dr Cesar Ballesteros, National Consultant (Pig Production) and from WHO: Dr Soe Hyunt, Dr Julie Hall, Tony Hazzard, Caroline-Anne Coulombe, Boris Paulin, Pierre Formenty, Peter Ben Embarek.

As this developed, DA Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup noted that the joint DA-DOH move last 10 December to inform the public of the resurfacing of the Reston virus has had no adverse impact on the consumption of pork during the last holiday season, as he noted that demand for the product remained high in that period.

"There were initial concerns raised by the hog industry on the effect of reports about the discovery of the Ebola Reston virus in swine. But contrary to that, a survey of the Social Weather Stations last 22 December showed that the most demanded agricultural wage product before Christmas was pork," Salacup said.

He noted that prices of pork even rose to P160-P170 a kilo due to high demand despite the government's official disclosure about the Reston virus's detection in a few hogs in one farm in Bulacan and another one in Pangasinan.

"The re-emergence of the Reston virus in hogs has had no impact insofar as the supply and consumption levels of pork are concerned," Salacup said.

The Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) reported that from 12-23December, or right after the DA and the DOH disclosed the re-emergence of the Reston virus, the prices of pork even shot up by P10 a kilo due to the increased demand for the commodity, which is a staple in the Noche Buena fare of Filipino families.

Salacup said the government had correctly handled the Reston case, with international health experts led by Dr Soe Nyunt-U, the WHO country representative to the Philippines, speaking earlier on behalf of his organization, FAO and the OIE, citing the DA and DOH for taking "appropriate action" in dealing with this animal health issue.

Earlier, DA Secretary Arthur Yap welcomed the arrival of the team of international animal and human health experts, saying the exhaustive tests it will carry out would help the government craft a national surveillance plan along with prevention and control programs to get rid of the Reston virus.

He noted that following the government's disclosure of this virus' return in December last year, the DA and BAI promptly asked the international health community for assistance in conducting a risk assessment, in testing the local swine population for the presence of the Reston virus and in drawing up diagnostics and disease prevention plans to prevent the spread of the infection.

Both Yap and Duque thanked the members of the international team last Wednesday and assured them of the government's full cooperation in the conduct of the study.

Lubroth, the mission's team leader, said that since learning about the existence of the virus in pigs in the Philippines,"FAO, OIE and WHO have been fully committed to provide technical assistance to the Government of the Philippines."

These experts arrived in Manila on 6 January and immediately started their mission, with the field investigation component beginning the following day, 7 January. Lubroth said the mission will last 10 days with preliminary results expected "in a few weeks at the earliest."

Catbagan noted that even before the arrival of the team of experts, the BAI already collected 110 blood samples from swine in a Reston-infected farm in Bulacan and another 55 samples from the affected farm in Pangasinan.

These samples, which were all collected last 27 December, were sent for testing to the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM), which had received ELISA kits for antigen and detection from the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control. The kits that were sent by the CDC are good for 8,000 blood samples.

ELISA stands for Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay, which is a biochemical technique to detect the presence of an antibody or antigen in a blood sample.

This total of 165 samples was on top of the 129 samples earlier sent to the RITM, all which tested negative for this virus, which has proven to be not harmful to humans.

Catbagan said that alongside helping the DA craft a national surveillance and disease prevention plan, the results of the experts' study would help the Department assess the public health risks of the Reston virus; evaluate its laboratory capabilities and needs; and work on its public awareness and risk communications campaigns.

He said that while the WHO has classified the Reston case as a "predominantly animal health issue," the DA would still want to determine how the virus, which infected monkeys about a decade ago, has now jumped to hogs.

He recalled that after a series of tests undertaken by the RITM to prevent the spread of the virus and determine the extent of the infection, it found out that there were no sick pigs and no sign of illness even in the animal caretakers where the Ebola Reston was detected.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 11, 2009, 12:29:50 PM
   
Sunday, January 11, 2009
 
 
RP’s Ebola-virus ‘brand’ sets
off alarm bells worldwide
 
By Paul M. Icamina, Special Reports Editor
 
THE discovery is disturbing: pork is one of the world’s most popular meats—though not among Muslims and Jews—and swine infected with a virus makes for a potentially alarming food on the table.

Pork is a major human food and the Ebola-Reston virus detected in Philippine swine prompted international food, animal and health experts to see for themselves the situation here.

The Ebola-Reston virus— detected in October in pigs from two commercial farms in Bulacan and Pangasinan— is not harmful to humans but it has shown in an earlier outbreak 20 years ago to be fatal to monkeys, a distant human cousin.

This is the first time the virus has jumped species and the first time ever anywhere in the world that it has been detected in a major food source that is closer than most to humans in the food chain.

At this point, given the little knowledge about the virus, “it is more an animal than a human health issue,” Health Secretary Francisco Duque 3rd told The Manila Times. “While there are potential public health implications, one can’t go beyond what the evidence shows.”

That is, the Ebola-Reston virus that affected laboratory monkeys from Laguna in the 1990s infected 25 people but they did not get ill; one handler got sick from what was probably an unrelated cause and he recovered quickly.

The Department of Agriculture (DA) says it is not a public health issue but a veterinary one, adding the Ebola-Reston strain “does not pose a significant public health risk.” Humans can get the virus, but it does not cause illness, the Department of Health (DOH) said in turn.

The concern this time is that the virus has been detected in food-producing swine. More worrisome is the possibility that hogs are so close to humans in the food chain that the virus may eventually infect humans.

Duque cautions there is very inadequate evidence to make definite conclusions now. “Anything is possible,” he said. “We want to make sure, to know more about the virus which is unique to the Philippines.”

“We don’t go overboard, nor should we assume a laid-back, complacent attitude,” he said. “It’s a tightrope [and] we have to look at the matter closely.”

“We can’t afford a cavalier attitude,” he added. “We are concerned but tempered against an epidemic of misinformation that is more dangerous. We have to look at the matter closely.”

The matter is “open-ended,” he said, adding that’s why the international experts have been invited to look at the matter closely. “Not really because of the potential threat to humans but because of the information, the scholastic, the very high research value.”

“All systems are in place to prevent public transmission. Our preparedness for SARS is now helping us adequately respond to emergencies,” Duque said in reference to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 caused by the SARS coronavirus.

“We are confident of our capability to test for the [Ebola-Reston] virus,” he said, citing facilities at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM).

The RITM said 94 percent of blood samples of hogs from affected farms tested negative for Ebola-Reston. Some 42 people who had close contact with the pigs also tested negative.

Cautious approach

“The fact that this is the first time that the virus has been found outside monkeys, and the first time ever, worldwide, that it has been found in swine, a food-producing animal, makes this mission particularly important—especially considering the potential implications for animal and human health and welfare,” said a statement this week from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

The FAO, OIE and WHO, upon the invitation of the government, are here on a 10-day mission that started on Monday. They are conducting field and laboratory investigation on the source of the virus, its transmission, virulence and natural habitat.

The aim is to provide appropriate guidance for animal and human health protection—although Ebola-Reston has not been found to be dangerous to humans.

Calling it an “unfolding situation,” FAO said other microorganisms isolated from sick and dying swine—rather than the Ebola-Reston virus—may have been the cause of elevated mortality.

Some 22 foreign epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, veterinarians, food safety and public health and risk communication experts are working closely with agriculture and health authorities.

Preliminary results, which will guide further investigations, are expected in a few weeks at the earliest.

In a cautious approach to what FAO calls an “evolving situation,” the United Nations agency stressed it is still not known whether humans can be infected.

“To make sweeping statements as to Yes-Risk or No-Risk based on six caretakers exposed to Ebola-Reston at this stage would be premature,” it said in a statement.

“The answer requires close collaboration between producers, veteri-narians, health officials and market intermediaries. Studies need to be carried out in the commercial swine sectors affected, animal handlers, throughout the market chain and its intermediaries, and among consumers before full advice can be given.”
 
   
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 11, 2009, 12:35:21 PM
   
Sunday, January 11, 2009
 
 
SPECIAL REPORT:EBOLA-RESTON VIRUS
 
Should the government have been more prompt in publicizing the accidental discovery of the Ebola-Reston virus?
 
DOH: Public disclosure
made at the correct time
 
 
A FEW critics of the government have faulted health and agriculture officials for allegedly not going public early enough—and only speaking up about the Ebola-Reston virus because of pressure from the United Nations and international health agencies.

The critics said the government had known about Ebola-Reston for a month before it was publicized on December 10.

But a Department of Health (DOH) disease expert said the Department of Agriculture (DA) was quick to ascertain the presence of the virus in other pig farms nationwide and were in constant consultation with health authorities.

The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) immediately quarantined the affected farms and agriculture officials nationwide were alerted.

All the infected animals in the two farms where the virus was detected were burned and buried, the premises and establishments disinfected and the affected areas put under strict quarantine and movement control.

Meat inspectors were also busy, albeit silently, making sure that contaminated products did not reach the market.

At the same time, the DOH and the BAI collected blood samples from animals and humans in the farm vicinity. No humans tested positive for antibodies, meaning their bodies have not initiated their immune defense because they were not infected.

Health officials were alerted and made ready to put in place contingency plans to contain a potential outbreak, if ever.

“Authorities wanted to make sure all preventive measures were in place, that the virus was only limited to two farms and were not widespread and indeed there was no cause for the public to panic,” explained the disease expert who requested anonymity.

“Intensive consultations, cross-checkings and verifications were made before authorities went public,” he stressed.

Only then, on December 10, did agriculture and health officials declare that swine in the two pig farms were found positive for the Ebola-Reston virus.

“Following the government disclosure, the DA and BAI promptly asked the international health community for assistance in conducting a risk assessment, in testing our swine population for the presence of the Ebola-Reston virus and in drawing up diagnostics and disease prevention plans to prevent the spread of the infection,” Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said.

Criticism has died down because the faultfinders have realized that the government had to make sure what they were dealing with and what the facts were before they could announce anything.

US Agriculture lab isolated the virus

A United States Department of Agriculture laboratory isolated the Ebola-Reston virus in swine samples and promptly alerted Philippine authorities on October 30.

More than a month passed before agriculture and health officials here announced that the virus was indeed detected in local swine.

And the decision to invite foreign experts was made on December 23.

By late December, even before the arrival of international experts, the BAI collected blood samples from farmhands and sent them for testing to the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM). All tested negative for the virus.

BAI Director Davinio Catbagan said that after a series of tests made to prevent the spread of the virus and determine the extent of the infection, the RITM found out that there were no sick pigs and no sign of illness among animal caretakers and butchers in slaughterhouses in affected areas.

Catbagan heads a Crisis Management Team on the Ebola-Reston virus that was created last month.

First-ever pork export halted

The detection of the virus caused the DA to suspend in December the country’s first-ever export, scheduled this month, of 50,000 tons of choice pork cuts from Polomolk, South Cotabato, to Singapore.

The suspension, Health Secretary Francisco Duque 3rd said, indicates a very conservative stance.

“Although the virus does not affect the health of humans, we decided to put on hold all exports,” Yap said, adding the virus must be eliminated first before the ban is lifted.

He said that all hogs that are sources of pork exports have passed the stringent requirements of Singapore health authorities on food safety, but the government still subjected the pork for testing as a matter of precaution.

“Given all the safeguard assurances, we still want to subject our farms to tests and we want to eradicate this virus,” he said.

The ban on pork exports remains effective until the virus is completely eradicated from livestock.

Catbagan also explained that from the original number of four farms—two of them commercial and two backyard—test results showed that only the pigs from the commercial farms in Pandi, Bulacan, and Manaoag, Panga-sinan, were positive for the Ebola-Reston virus.

These farms have since been quarantined.

“As we clear those farms, then we are going to go back to our export track,” Yap said, even as he expressed optimism that all hogs in South Cotabato and General Santos City will test negative for the virus.

“I’m confident that Visayas and Mindanao are not affected at all because since 1995 we have stopped moving animals from Luzon to these regions.”

Inspectors have been directed to confiscate meat products from Luzon that do not have shipping permits and travelers have been urged to refrain from bringing meat and meat products especially from Luzon. Quarantine checkpoints are up on major highways.

Cagayan de Oro City reported 2,000 hog fatalities in what was reported to be an outbreak of “hog cholera” in late November in backyard pigpens. Misamis Oriental reported another 300 hog fatalities.

Yap said the findings of the international experts would help determine not only the extent and possible source of the Ebola-Reston infection but also of other virulent swine diseases such as the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome.

And they would help the government craft a national surveillance plan along with prevention and control programs to rid the country of the Ebola-Reston virus.
-- Paul M. Icamina And Ira Karen Apanay
 
   
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 11, 2009, 12:49:54 PM

Heart to Heart Talk
Deadlier than Ebola virus


By Dr. Philip S. Chua
Cebu Daily News
First Posted 13:37:00 12/29/2008

Filed Under: Health, Diseases, Politics, Local authorities, Government


The recent incident surrounding the revelation of the discovery of Ebola Reston virus in pigs in the Philippines clearly underscores the incompetence, irresponsibility, and callousness of our government. It also highlights how reckless it could be with public health, safety, and the lives of its citizens. Given the choice between promptly informing the public for the prevention of a potential grave risk to people’s lives and protecting the pig industry, the government chose to safeguard the market and hide the truth from the people. Why am I not surprised?

Three deadly strains of the Ebola virus killed countless people in the Congo, wiping out villages, in 1976. That epidemic and the subsequent equally lethal Ebola outbreaks in the various parts of the globe created massive fear in people’s mind around the world.

Fortunately, the outbreak in pigs in the Philippines involved the Ebola Reston, a strain that infects monkeys and has not been found to cause disease in humans. But that’s beside the point.

While there is no scientific evidence at the present that Ebola Reston can be transmitted by animals to humans, the experts also do not know if “passing” from monkeys to pig the virus could mutate to a deadly strain like the other three and eventually develop the ability to infect humans.

The possibility of said mutation alone, and the subsequent potential grave risk, would have alarmed any intelligent and responsible person. But these qualities seem to be too much to expect from many of our government officials.

The following pertinent excerpts from the article written by Jonathan Cheng, which appeared in the December 19, 2008 issue of the Wall Street Journal, vividly illustrate how our government bungled the handling of this important public health issue:

“Global health authorities are preparing an emergency mission to the Philippines after U.S. scientists discovered a strain of the Ebola virus in dead pigs there that had previously only been found in monkeys.

“But (international) health officials say it is too early to rule out a possible threat to humans, and expressed concern over the fact that this incident, first revealed in an Oct. 30, 2008 teleconference between the Philippine government and U.S. health authorities, wasn’t made public until a news conference for local media in Manila last week.

“Pigs have served as genetic mixing vessels for viruses that pass from animals to humans, which makes the Philippine discovery significant ... When a virus jumps species, in this case from monkeys to pigs, we become concerned, particularly as pigs are much closer to humans than monkeys in their ability to harbor viruses,” says Peter Cordingley, Western Pacific spokesman for the World Health Organization in Manila.

“According to officials at the WHO, the World Organization for Animal Health and the Philippines’ Bureau of Animal Industry, pig farmers in three provinces near the capital of Manila began noticing high rates of sickness and death among their livestock as early as May.

“In August, Philippine authorities sent samples from the dead pigs to the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in New York, where scientists detected the presence of several diseases, including a devastating pig virus known as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or blue-ear pig disease.

“Weeks later, during the October 30 teleconference, authorities at the Philippines’ Department of Agriculture were notified that scientists had further discovered Ebola Reston virus in six of the 28 pig samples sent to the U.S.

“The Philippine government waited until December 10 to make the presence of Ebola Reston virus public, citing concern for the pork industry and a lack of evidence that humans were in any danger.

“The WHO said it learned of the disease through the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization in late November. Concerns have been deepening across Asia about diseases among stocks of chickens and pigs, including H5N1 avian influenza and blue-ear pig disease. The latest announcement forced the Philippines to abort its first-ever commercial export of pork, which was to be made to Singapore earlier this month.

“According to people at the WHO and the Paris-based World Organization for Animal Health, known by its French acronym OIE, Philippine authorities decided to go public only after being pressured by those two groups and the FAO. Dr. Bernard Vallat, director-general of the OIE, said it was ‘not an easy negotiation’ to persuade Philippine authorities to go public with the news.

“He said the pigs were most likely killed by another disease, but that the presence of the Ebola Reston virus in pigs should be investigated to assess the risk to humans.

“The Ebola virus comes in five distinct strains, three of which are associated with the high-fatality outbreaks that first appeared in the Congo in 1976. In 1989, scientists discovered what would be known as the Reston strain of the Ebola virus among monkeys imported from the Philippines and kept for research in a Reston, Va., lab. A handful of humans were infected in that case, but only one person showed any symptoms, and fully recovered.”

If the World Health Organization and the international experts, who are foreigners, showed that much concern for the welfare and safety of the Filipinos, why don’t our government officials at least care as much, if not more, for our own people, instead of being blatantly dishonest and contemptuous of them?

But, of course, what else is new?

This cancer of indifference, immorality, incompetence, and irresponsibility afflicting majority of our government officials, not to mention the pervasive malignant graft and corruption among most of them, are far worse than the Ebola virus itself.

While even the deadliest Ebola strain can only kill its victims, the criminals and plunderers in our government, with premeditation, methodically kill not only the future of the Filipinos, but also their self-respect, hope, dignity, and pride as a people and as a nation.

These Philippine strains of eBola Trapo viruses (where “e” stands for evil and “Bola” for lies and larceny) are much deadlier, indeed!

My prescription: A massive dose of a truly united People Power vaccine for good governance to eliminate all these sickening bugs!

What are we waiting for?

Here’s wishing you one and all: A year of new vision and hope for our people and our nation.
 

 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 12, 2009, 02:51:22 PM
 Mysterious disease hits backyard farms in Davao del Sur
[12 January 2009] At least 50 pigs from at eight villages in Davao del Sur province in Mindanao, Philippines have died from a mixture of viral and bacterial infection, said provincial veterinarian Dr Nestor Barroga, who added that they could not yet determine what type of virus has affected the animals. Animals in the area are already being quarantined and affected farms have been disinfected while veterinary officials wait for test results. Symptoms include excessive salivation, red skin and blood oozing from the snout. Among the viruses suspected of causing the deaths is hog cholera complicated by PRRS. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 13, 2009, 10:47:34 AM
 Philippines eyes lifting of quarantine on local hogs
[13 January 2009] The Philippine Department of Agriculture is seeking to have the quarantine on local hogs lifted to enable it to send its pork meat exports to Singapore. The first shipment was scheduled for loading in early December 2008, but was scrapped following findings that the Ebola-Reston virus was found in some pig samples sent to a US laboratory. Although the virus is non-pathogenic to humans, and was only found in samples from pigs from Luzon, the government decided to hold back the shipment. Further tests on pigs have yielded negative results and the DA and the Bureau of Animal Industry is now eyeing the removal of the quarantine. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 13, 2009, 10:51:50 AM
Monday, January 12, 2009Print This Page
Pork Export Accreditation Plans Put on Hold
THE PHILIPPINES - The government has temporarily set aside its plans to tap Asian markets for its pork exports, pending findings of tests by an international team now in the country to study the Ebola Reston virus in local hogs, the head of the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) said in a phone interview late last week.



The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), the Livestock Development Council, and the NMIS — all attached agencies of the Agriculture department — have put on hold plans to apply for pork export accreditation from South Korea, Hong Kong and Japan, NMIS Executive Director Jane C. Bacayo said. "We have to prioritize because we are not yet sure on the effects of Ebola [Reston on hogs and humans]" Mr Bacayo said in Filipino.

The agencies had earlier planned to submit documents on local sanitary and biosecurity programs to South Korea in the last part of 2008, as well as to Japan and Hong Kong early this year, according to BusinessWorld.

"With this Ebola scare, no one from abroad will buy from us until we get a final statement of the international organizations," Albert R.T. Lim, Jr., president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., said in a separate phone interview.

The Ebola-Reston virus, a subtype of Ebola, was discovered in the Philippines in 1989 among crab-eating macaques exported to the Hazleton Laboratories in Reston, Virginia. Late in October last year, the Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory of the US Department of Agriculture reported to the Agriculture department that six out of 28 pig tissue samples taken from four hog farms in May, June and September were positive for the virus.

While Ebola Reston is believed to be harmless to humans, the outbreaks last year were the first recorded cases of the virus jumping species, hence, the concern.

"We continue to communicate with foreign governments to learn more about their safety protocols, but we cannot focus on [meeting the protocols] right now," Mr Bacayo said.

"[Getting export accreditation] will depend on the outcome of the studies and recommendations of the international experts," he added.

Mr Lim agreed, saying that plans will now depend "if we can get a clean bill of health from those agencies."

A 22-man team of public and animal health experts from the World Health Organization (WHO), World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and Agriculture department are testing tissue samples from hog farms in the towns of Pandi in Bulacan and Manaoag in Pangasinan — the suspected source of the virus. The 10-day mission will end early next week.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 14, 2009, 09:12:31 AM
Tuesday, January 13, 2009Print This Page
Hog Producers Blame Retailers for High Costs
THE PHILIPPINES - The Christmas holidays are over but retail prices of pork have increased by more than six per cent to as much as P180 per kilo from a week-ago and retailers and hog raisers are pointing fingers at each other.



A price monitoring report by the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics of the Department of Agriculture showed that Metro Manila retail prices of pork liempo went up to P180 per kilo as of 8 January from P170 per kilo of 3 January while pork ham also increased by P10 per kilo to P170 from P160 per kilo.

According to Manila Bulletin Online, hog raisers have blamed the high cost of pork meats on the retailers saying that farm gate prices have not increased as much since December last year.

"Absolutely there is no reason why retail prices should go up that much because the average farm gate is only P105 per kilo," said Albert Lim, president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc.

Even at farm gate prices of P140 to P150 per kilo, Lim said that retail prices should have increased only to P175 per kilo. At the current farmgate rates, retail prices should have been lower.

According to Lim, farm gate prices have not moved much since December when demand was up and farm gate prices were at P100 to P102 and now P105.

Lim also noted that increase in farm gate prices was limited to P2 only per kilo despite the fact that prices of corn, which is converted into feed hogs, are now hitting P24 per kilo.

There could also be a shortage in local corn production because of the poor harvest, he said.

In December, corn prices were at P12 to P13 per kilo but prices shoot up to P18 per kilo before Christmas.

Lim said that as prices of corn go up, the backyard hog raisers are the first to be affected.

On the other hand, traders said there is really a shortage in hogs because of the "ebola" disease and the high price of corn.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 15, 2009, 11:07:13 PM
Thursday, January 15, 2009Print This Page
High Demand for Poultry and Meat Products Seen
THE PHILIPPINES - Provincial Veterinarian Romeo Magdato foresaw a high demand of poultry and meat products this year based on the demand/consumption reported last year.



Magdato in an interview assured the public that pork coming from Antique is certified free of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) and safe from Ebola Reston virus despite detection of said virus in few hogs in two farms in Bulacan and Pangasinan late last year,

"We continue to be supplier of poultry and meat products to Aklan particularly Boracay, Iloilo and some parts of Metro Manila because of the high demand from these areas", the source said.

The implementation of Piglet Restocking program of the Department of Agriculture has helped a lot in providing supply of pork not just for local consumption but also of other areas.

PROVET further reported that supply of poultry and livestock were affected by the devastation of typhoon Frank last year where hundred of stocks were killed/lost.

Magdato encouraged poultry and livestock raisers even in backyards to double the production since the demand are increasing and prices are on the uptrend where hog cost P85-P88 a kilo in current livestock market prices.

Meanwhile, the government has formed a local team to assist a visiting group of International human and animal health experts carry out a 10-day epidemiological investigation into the re-emergence of the Ebola Reston virus that was detected in Bulacan and Pangasinan said the Department of Agriculture (DA).

DA Secretary Arthur Yap has welcomed the arrival of the team of international animal and human health experts, saying the exhaustive tests it will carry out would help the government craft a national surveillance plan along with prevention and control programs to get rid of the Reston virus, PIA report said.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 24, 2009, 08:37:46 AM
Friday, January 23, 2009Print This Page
DOH Confirms Worker Infected with Ebola-Reston
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Health (DOH) confirmed that one farm worker in the Philippines has been infected with Ebola-Reston antibodies, officials announced today.



ABS-CBN News reports that the US Center for Disease Control (CDC) said this is likely to be an old infection contracted more than six months ago.

The person is healthy and has had no serious illness in the past 12 months, said Dr. Enrique Tayag, director of the Department of Health's National Epidemiology Center.

The government ban on pork exports is still in effect.

The source of the virus is still being determined, and the scientific investigation is still on-going.

Experts from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Organization for Animal Health, and the World Health Organization are in the Philippines to investigate the discovery of a strain of the Ebola virus in some dead pigs in the Philippines.

The Philippines had asked the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) for help in stopping the spread of Ebola-Reston virus after an infection was found in some hog farms last year.

The presence of the Ebola-Reston virus in some pigs in two commercial farms and two backyard farms in the country was the first such case anywhere in the world.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 29, 2009, 04:03:27 AM
Wednesday, January 28, 2009Print This Page
Possible Hog Cholera Infection Reported
THE PHILIPPINES - The local veterinary office in Tacloban City has been receiving reports of possible cholera infection in pigs, reported a health official today.



SOURCE reports that Eunice Alcantara, city veterinary officer, said her office have been receiving reports about pigs that have diarrhea, fever and other respiratory diseases, which are symptoms of hog cholera.

"Barangay Captains and some individuals are coming to the office about these reports. We give [the pigs] immediate treatments," Alcantara said.

Alcantara, meanwhile, assured Tacloban City residents that there is nothing to worry about the reports. She said none of the pigs have been tested positive with hog cholera.

She, however, advised the public to carefully choose pork products in the market. She said the public should avoid eating pork of sick hogs.

Alcantara said meat inspectors are now closely monitoring hog farms and around the city and nearby towns. She said meat inspectors are also strictly inspecting pigs being brought to the city slaughter house.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 29, 2009, 01:23:47 PM
27 January 2009] Philippine hog production in 2008 dropped 1.6% to 1.86 million tonnes. The Bureau of Agricultural Statistics reported that there were notable decreases in stocks and number of animals slaughtered in Luzon because of the hog cholera scare during the first half of the year, and that while there was a slight increase in slaughtering volume in the last half of the year, it was “not enough to offset the losses” recorded earlier. Value-wise, however, the sector posted an 11.29% increase with PHP 149.59 billion (USD 3.16 billion) from PHP 134.42 billion (USD 2.84 billion) in 2007. The growth is attributed to improved farm prices which averaged PHP 80.61 (USD 1.70)/kg in 2008 vs PHP 71.27 (USD 1.51)/kg year before
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on January 31, 2009, 04:21:58 AM
Friday, January 30, 2009Print This Page
Exposure to Ebola-Reston Virus Confirmed
MANILA - At least four Filipinos were found to have been exposed to the Ebola-Reston virus that was discovered in pig farms in the Philippines, health officials confirmed today.



However, Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said there is no cause for alarm as the five workers had antibodies that indicated they have developed an immunity to the virus.

"Hindi kailangan mangamba basta gawin ang apat na tagubilin ng DOH (There is no cause for worry so long as you follow the four steps the health department has prescribed)," Mr Duque said in an interview on dzBB radio.

GMA News.tv reports that Mr Duque said the steps include keeping infected hogs out of the food chain, taking bio-safety and bio-security measures, making sure pork is cooked, and prevention of double-dead meat.

Consumers can call a hotline for the Ebola Reston virus at (02)925-99-99, he said.

Radio dzBB's Carlo Mateo quoted National Epidemiology Center head Eric Tayag as saying three of the five were from affected hog farms, one from the Valenzuela area, and one from a backyard farm.

Mr Tayag said they are still investigating how the five were exposed to the virus.

Mr Duque said the four found positive for exposure to the Ebola Reston virus had normal immune systems and do not need to be quarantined.

"Kaya nilang tibagin ang virus, hindi na sila kailangang i-quarantine.

Hindi sila infectious (They have an immunity against the virus, they do not need to be quarantined. They are not infectious)," he said.

The four Filipinos were among the 77 who gave blood samples to health workers.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 03, 2009, 05:22:23 AM
BY NEIL JEROME C. MORALES, Reporter

RP seeks clean bill of health from contagious animal virus
THE GOVERNMENT last week submitted its application to the World Organization for Animal Health (also known for its French acronym OIE) to remove most parts of Luzon island in the list of areas with foot and mouth disease (FMD), which would effectively facilitate domestic and international livestock trade.

"We have already submitted documents last Jan. 28 for the initial evaluation of [OIE] animal health experts. After the evaluation in February, we will know if we have a chance [to be certified FMD-free]," Reildrin G. Morales, deputy head of the National FMD Task Force of the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), said in an interview late last week.

"There would be an initial evaluation by [six to ten FMD] experts. If we pass, our application would be endorsed to the scientific commission [for a comprehensive evaluation]," he said in Filipino.

The Philippines had filed for the restoration of its FMD-free status for Luzon in 2008, but was retained in the list of countries with FMD due to a missing blood test. The OIE also questioned the swill feeding and quarantine measures to prevent the entry of smuggled pork.

OIE experts sent their comments to the government only in March 2008, which was short time for the government to respond before the OIE general session held last May, Mr. Morales said.

The BAI last year collected 5,000-6,000 blood samples for the protein elisa test, he added.

FMD is a highly contagious viral disease that infects cloven-hoofed animals. The local livestock sector had lost about P2.3 billion from the 1995 outbreak to 2005 because of the disease.

The latest FMD infection was recorded in December 2005 in Lukban, Quezon province.

The Agriculture department had allotted P10 million annually to eradicate FMD.

The government has sought FMD-free with vaccination certification for Pangasinan province in Region 1 (Ilocos Region) and provinces in Region 3 (Central Luzon) except for Aurora and Region 4-A (Cavite-Laguna-Batangas-Rizal-Quezon), and the rest of Luzon as FMD-free without vaccination.

Regions 3 and 4-A account for more than a quarter of domestic hog production.

The OIE had certified Mindanao as FMD-free in 2001, and Visayas, Palawan and Masbate in 2002.

FMD-free areas without vaccination are allowed free movement of hogs and pork products to other provinces and countries.

"For one, we could be allowed to export [pork products from Luzon] especially if we can get over with the Ebola Reston case," Mr. Morales said.

The Agriculture department has issued an export ban on all pork products following the detection of Ebola Reston in local hogs late last year.

That is what we want, for us to be able to export hogs or pork products to other countries," Albert R. T. Lim, Jr., president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., said in a separate phone interview.

Mr. Lim said Koreans have been asking the industry for pork bellies while traders from Hong Kong have shown interest in buying live hogs.

Hog production dropped last year by 1.6% to 1.855 million metric tons (MT) from 1.886 million MT as the industry is only starting to recover from a hog respiratory disease two years ago and due to a cholera scare in the first semester last year, data from the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics show.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 03, 2009, 05:25:29 AM
Monday, February 02, 2009Print This Page
DoH Issues Warning Against Salmonella-tainted Pork
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Health (DoH) in Eastern Visayas has warned people about pork infected with salmonella bacteria.



Health officials have urged consumers to buy only pork meat that was certified by the National Meat Inspection Services (NMIS), in the wake of reports that Salmonella infected hundreds of hogs in one Samar town alone, said Boyd Cerdo, regional sentinel nurse of the Department of Health for Eastern Visayas.

Salmonella is harmful to humans and can cause diarrhea. Humans can contract salmonella by eating the meat of infected animals, Cerdo said.

“Salmonella bacteria are present in the intestines of the infected animal. For this reason, we at the Department of Health strongly advise against its consumption,” he said.

The regional office of the Department of Health has reported that salmonella has infected about 750 pigs from various villages of Sta. Rita town in Samar.

Eighty-four of these hogs were confirmed to have died due to the bacteria, reports Inquirer.net. The Department of Health said the emergence of the bacteria could have been caused by poor sanitation, contaminated feeds, improper care of animals and even the bad weather condition.

Cerro also warned that the waste of the sick pigs could also contaminate water sources, since some of these were stray animals.

“That is why, we urged the Department of Agriculture to intensify its campaign [against the infected hogs], especially on its quarantine procedure,” Cerro said.

Since Salmonella in pigs was detected in the region last December, the health department had not monitored persons getting sick due to the bacteria from affected pigs, Cerro said.

The National Meat Inspection Services, an agency of the Department of Agriculture, earlier received reports that salmonella affected pigs in other towns like in Burauen, Dagami, both in Leyte and even Tacloban City.

But these cases had yet to be confirmed, NMIS supervising officer Doctor Claro Dennis Morantte said.

Morantte said health inspectors in the region were ordered to report immediately any occurrence of the bacteria in their respective areas.

The NMIS strictly prohibited clandestine slaughtering of hogs, he said.

“We have also put up some check points, particularly in Sta. Rita, to control the movements of those animals,” Morantte added.

The NMIS also recommended the isolation of pigs showing symptoms of the disease that include the loss of appetite, diarrhea and fever ranging from 40 degrees Celsius up to 42 degrees Celsius.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 03, 2009, 05:42:51 AM
 Four more farm workers infected with Ebola Reston
[03 February 2009] Philippine Health Secretary Francisco Duque III confirmed that four more individuals have tested positive for Ebola Reston virus antibodies, bringing the total to five. The four new cases were from pig farms in Bulacan, Pangasinan and Valenzuela City, and a slaughterhouse in Pangasinan. The first who tested positive was a backyard pig farmer from Valenzuela City. Mr Duque reiterates that there is no cause for alarm as all five individuals are healthy and have not been sick in the previous year. Based on initial findings, the five individuals got exposed by directly handling infected pigs. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 04, 2009, 06:35:15 AM
Salmonella infection hit pigs in Eastern Visayas
[04 February 2009] The Philippine Department of Agriculture is calling on local government units in Eastern Visayas after reports the 760 pigs in the town of Sta Rita in Samar province have been infected with salmonella, 84 of which have died. The DA has recommended a ban on the movement of pigs from infected to non-infected areas, isolation, treatment and therapy for infected animals, ban on slaughtering of sick pigs, and setting up of checkpoints in strategic places to ensure that the infection in contained.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 07, 2009, 04:13:49 AM
Friday, February 06, 2009Print This Page
Close Monitoring for Ebola Virus in the Philippines
PHILIPPINES - Authorities have increased the level of monitoring for Ebola Reston virus following the infection of four people with the virus.



Veterinary authorities in Misamis Oriental have told Sun Star of the Philippines that they are closely monitoring signs of Ebola Reston in the province, as four people have been reported to have contracted the rare virus through pig-to-human transmission.

Dr Alfonso Ramosa, the province's veterinary chief, said they are being extra cautious about Ebola Reston – first discovered among monkeys in Luzon in 1989 – because "we could not specifically tell the symptoms and effect of the Ebola virus on hogs."

He said they are closely coordinating with the Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Agriculture in monitoring the disease for immediate containment.

The province's livestock industry is still reeling from last year's hog cholera outbreak, which killed over 2,000 pigs. Hundreds of pigs also died in Cagayan de Oro.

The outbreak led to a massive vaccination program all over Region 10, in which at least 34,000 pigs in Misamis Oriental alone were vaccinated.

Dr Ramosa said Ebola Reston may not be fatal to humans unlike cholera, but immediate prevention was still imperative as the virus strain may evolve into lethal subtypes.

Three of the Ebola virus's five sub-types are associated with deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans; two other subtypes, including the Reston, are not, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Health Secretary, Francisco Duque III, said on 30 January there are now five known cases of possible pig-to-human transmission of the virus after a backyard hog raiser from a northern Manila suburb became the first confirmed case this month.

An initial report said that none of the five men wore protective clothing and all had direct contact with sick pigs, according to Mr Duque.

Ebola Reston has not been known to cause serious illness among humans. At least 25 people in the Philippines have been infected with the virus by monkeys, but only one victim exhibited mild flu-like symptoms.

WHO's Dr Julie Hall said the five cases in the Philippines "increase the likelihood” of pig-to-human transmission of the virus, but investigators were not yet certain. She said all five people are now virus-free.

"They are not infectious, they therefore do not need to be quarantined," she told Sun Star.

While the virus appears to pose low risks to humans, Dr Hall said the government must implement strict measures such as quick reporting of sick or dying pigs and preventing the sale of illegally slaughtered meat to keep the virus from spreading among the swine population.

The government has already invited experts from WHO, Food and Agriculture Organization, and World Organization for Animal Health early this month to conduct a study on the health risks of the virus, first found in pigs in the country in October.

The discovery not only marked the first time the virus has been found outside of monkeys, but also the first time it has been found in swine, a food-producing animal.

Health officials were trying to locate anyone who may have had contact with the five men, concludes the Sun Star report.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 10, 2009, 07:46:51 AM
Monday, February 09, 2009Print This Page
Salmonella Infection in Samar Hogs Under Control
THE PHILIPPINES - It is considered that the cases of salmonella infection of hogs in Santa Rita town in Samar province are now "under control," reported Dr. Andrew Orais, Regional Livestock Coordinator.



"There were no report until this time of sick pigs from the area. We are optimistic that the cases are now controlled," said Mr Orais.

Records have indicated that since December last year 84 pigs have died and almost 772 hogs were affected. Twenty-five others were found to have been slaughtered by owners upon detection of the symptoms of the disease.

The cases affected seven barangays of Santa Rita.

"We have been conducting a series of animal health missions in the municipality. So far 334 pigs had been treated, 252 were given prophylaxis and 87 were vaccinated,” Mr Orais disclosed.

According to Filipino news agency, ABS-CBN News, he said that based on their assessment, at least 90 per cent of the swine that were treated “have recovered."

“Cases of deaths could have been prevented if only suspected animals were reported at once and consequently given treatment. We encourage the hog raisers to immediately contact the nearest veterinary or agriculture office once they observe manifestations of the disease,” he stressed.

He said that after receiving reports of hog mortalities in Barangay Manunca in Santa Rita last December, “we immediately conducted an investigation in the area.”

Laboratory tests of liver and tissue samples from the affected animals were found positive of salmonella infection and not hog cholera. Hog infected with salmonella bacteria exhibit clinical signs such as, loss of appetite, high fever, diarrhoea, nasal discharge and conjunctivitis.

"We implemented the so-called biosecurity measures in order to prevent the spread of the disease to non-affected areas, we recommended a 30-day strict quarantine regulation in Santa Rita. This means, in particular, that movement of hogs will be regulated through several checkpoints installed at strategic locations. Likewise, we proposed banning the slaughter of sick animals,” he stated.

Through the Quick Response Team of DA and with the help of local officials, certain prevention and control measures were implemented to control the spread of the disease.

“But until this time we are intensifying our information campaign focused on proper management practices in backyard swine raising, observance of good hygiene and proper disposal of dead animals.

"We also advise residents, especially hog owners, that if they observe something wrong with their pigs to kindly report it immediately to the nearest municipal agriculturist officer for proper action,” he added.

The infection among the hogs was detected December last year and by early January, DA officials confirmed it as salmonella infection and not hog cholera as was initially thought of.

Among factors that reportedly trigger the infection were feeds contamination, changes in weather conditions, continuous rains, no proper housing and sanitation and poor nutrition.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 10, 2009, 07:48:01 AM
Monday, February 09, 2009Print This Page
Corn Shortage Likely to Up Pork and Chicken Prices
THE PHILIPPINES - An agricultural lawmaker has warned of possible increases in the price of pork and chicken as the country faces a shortage of corn.



According to AGAP party-list group Rep. Nicanor Briones, the shortage of corn would definitely have an impact on the price of pork, chicken and eggs since corn comprises 50 per cent of the feeds animal raisers use.

“As it is now, there is a price hike on chicken and pork and it will continue to increase if there will be a corn shortage,” Briones said.

Moreover, corn prices increased in January to between P25 and P28 a kilo from P12 to P13 a kilo, reports The Manila Times.

However, Briones said the price of corn went down to P18 a kilo this month because of the importation of 100,000 metric tons of young corn from Brazil and 120,000 metric tons of feed wheat from Ukraine.

He said the country would import more corn, 62,500 metric tons this month and 187,500 metric tons from March to May to meet the demand until the second quarter of the year.

He added that corn is being pegged at 600,000 metric tons in the coming months.

According to Briones, the original plan was to course the privately financed importation through the National Food Authority (NFA) to expedite the process and minimize, if not lift, the 35-percent tariff duty on imports.

But NFA imposes a fixed tariff of P4 for a kilo of corn, which is not beneficial to the farmers especially when the price of corn in the world market has gotten really low.

The Department of Agriculture has said NFA should have a buffer stock of 75,000 metric tons to 100,00 metric tons of corn to shield the farmers from shortages and possible unscrupulous hoarding.

In light of this development, Briones has asked the Agriculture department to bring down the fixed tariff to P2 a kilo to help the poor farmers, and avoid the subsequent increases in the price of pork and chicken.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 11, 2009, 04:13:14 AM
Tuesday, February 10, 2009Print This Page
More Than 200 Hogs Die in Cholera Outbreak
THE PHILIPPINES - An outbreak of cholera killed at least 240 hogs in the southern Philippine province of North Cotabato, a health official reported yesterday.



The outbreak was detected in the remote villages near the Malitubog River in the townships of Alamada, Aleosan, and Midsayap, according to Dr. Enrico Garzon, a local veterinary officer.

Garzon said hog traders and raisers in the region have been informed of what they would do to counter the disease.

"We suspect contaminated water caused the outbreak," Garzon said.

Also known as Classical Swine Fever (CSF), hog cholera is a contagious disease transmitted through direct contact between healthy swine and infected swine.

Local officials warned people against eating meat from infected animals, as antibiotics used to cure them could be harmful to human beings.

The cholera broke out months after health officials found a strain of Ebola virus among hogs at some northern farms in the country. It was the first time in the world that the Ebola virus was found on the swine, a food-producing animal category.

Last month, the Philippine health authorities also reported that three pig farm workers and a slaughterhouse worker have been found infected with the Ebola-Reston virus.

Ebola-Reston, unlike its African counterparts which are proven deadly to humans, was first found on monkeys shipped from the Philippines to Reston, Virginia, the United States in 1989.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 12, 2009, 05:24:31 AM
Wednesday, February 11, 2009Print This Page
China Bans Filipino Pork Imports
BEIJING - China's top quality supervisor has banned imports of Philippine pork products after the island country reported finding of Ebola-Reston virus in four pig herds on its Luson Island at the end of last year.



It was the first time the lethal virus was discovered in livestock.

All pork products from Philippine already at Chinese ports should be turned back or destroyed, the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (GAQSIQ) said in an online announcement on Wednesday.

The administration also said no to pigs or pork products coming to China via delivery and travelers. Pork products found on foreign ships, planes or trains staying in the country will be frozen.

At the same time, the administration urged people from Philippines having symptoms such as fever, muscle pain, blood loss or fetter to report to quarantine institutes and seek medical help as soon as possible.

Ebola virus, first found in the 1960s, has four types. It could communicate among people via sweat, blood and saliva and cause fevers with a death rate over 80 per cent. There has been few reports of human deaths from Ebola-Reston type so far.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 13, 2009, 03:51:46 AM
Thursday, February 12, 2009Print This Page
DA Probes Unknown Disease Affecting Hogs
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) office in the region said it has noted sporadic cases of a hog disease in 18 towns and two cities in Eastern Visayas and is already investigating its cause.



In the province of Leyte, DA said there had been reports of sick hogs in the city of Tacloban as well as in towns of Babatngon, Jaro, Alang-alang, Sta. Fe, Palo, Pastrana, Dagami, Buraeun, Tabontabon, La Paz, Mayorga, Abuyog and Dulag.

In the province of Southern Leyte, the disease was also noted in some hogs in the town of Sogod while in Samar it was observed in Catbalogan City, Daram and Sta. Rita.

In the province of Northern Samar, there were 16 cases of sick hogs reported as of Monday in five villages in Lope de Vega town while 20 were reported in Catarman.

Clinical signs of the sick hogs reportedly included loss of appetite, weakness, presence of nasal discharge and fever, reports ABS-CBN News.

Authorities have not yet established the nature of the disease observed in the sick hogs but they suspect it to be a viral infection.

“Hog cholera is endemic in the region. But it could also be viral flu or other types of viral infection,“ said Dr. Leo Mira of the Animal Quarantine Division of DA.

Mira further stressed that they have yet to confirm their suspicion through the result of laboratory tests of blood, urine and fecal samples of the sick animals.

He also clarified that the disease should not cause alarm to humans as it is only confined to the animals. Treatment was also given to the sick animals and he said most of them have responded.

DA has earlier declared the salmonellosis cases in hogs in Sta. Rita town in Samar province under control. As of Tuesday last week, there were 772 sick hogs and 84 deaths and as of now DA said no incidence of morbidity was noted in the town.

Meanwhile, suspected hemorrhagic septicemia or “hemosep” in carabaos was also reported in Calbiga town in Samar but DA said it still has to get the formal report from the town officials including the number of affected animals.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 13, 2009, 04:15:52 AM
Philippines: CSF hits North Cotabato 10 Feb 2009
A suspected Classical Swine Fever (CSF) outbreak in three North Cotabato towns on the Philippines has resulted in the deaths of 240 pigs since last week, Businessworld reports.
Dr Enrico P. Garzon, chief provincial veterinarian, has advised owners of affected hogs to bury them as consuming infected meat may be dangerous to human health. CSF is also known as hog cholera.


"The suspected hog cholera outbreak hit the towns of Alamada, Aleosan and Midsayap," Garzon said.


Verification
Dr John B. Pascual, Department of Agriculture (DA) livestock division chief, said news of the hog cholera outbreak has reached their office here and that they will verify the report.


"We will get tissue samples and have them tested in our laboratory. We will resort to quarantining pigs [in] North Cotabato if we confirm that there is indeed a hog cholera outbreak in the area," he said.


Scheduled programme
North Cotabato vice-governor Emmanuel F. Piñol was concerned on the outbreak’s impact to a scheduled programme launch to increase the income of backyard swine growers. He confirmed that hogs have been dying but 'they are in remote areas' of the province and that the case 'was not alarming'.


The island of Mindanao has been certified FMD-free by the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) or World Organization for Animal Health.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: nemo on February 14, 2009, 01:58:33 AM
Hope so this is hog cholera and not PRRS.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 14, 2009, 05:48:25 AM
Friday, February 13, 2009Print This Page
Pork and Chicken Prices Go Up
THE PHILIPPINES - The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) said the Ebola Reston virus scare has finally taken its toll on the prices of chicken and pork sold in public markets, a television report said today.



A GMA Flash Report said the the DTI noted that current prices of chicken had gone up by P10 per kilogram from P110 to P120.

Meanwhile, the DTI said that pork prices also spiked by as much as P30 a kilo from the previous P140 to P150 to the current P180.

Trade Undersecretary Zenaida Maglaya said the price adjustments were triggered by consumers shifting from eating pork to chicken.

Mr Maglaya attributed this shift to the fear sowed by the recent discovery of a number of hog farm workers from Bulacan and Pampanga being previously exposed to the virus.

The Department of Health (DoH) said that while the cases show that the virus could have been transferred from pig to human, it assured that the hog farmers are in healthy condition.

Aside from the virus scare, Mr Maglaya said that the “tight" supply of chicken feed in the market had also contributed to the price increase.

But meat was not the only basic commodity that became more expensive, according to the DTI, as rice prices have likewise gone up by an average of P2 per kilogram.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 16, 2009, 07:50:54 AM
Hog cholera kills 240 pigs in North Cotabato
[16 February 2009] Roughly 240 pigs have died of hog cholera in North Cotabato province in a Mindanao since late January following flashfloods that submerged several areas in the province. A report by the Philippine Daily Inquirer cited North Cotabato Governor Jesus Sacdalan as saying that the disease was detected in towns of Alamada, Aleosan and Midsayap, and that “a massive anti-cholera immunization drive had been immediately launched to save the remaining hogs from being afflicted with the disease.”
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 23, 2009, 10:30:55 PM
MARK MERUEÑAS, GMANews.TV
02/23/2009 | 05:12 PM

Email this | Email the Editor | Print | ShareThis

Agriculture Sec. Arthur Yap, inspecting pork at a public market in this file photo, orders the 'depopulation of some 6,000 pigs due to the Ebola Reston virus scare. Charlie MagnoMANILA, Philippines - The Department of Agriculture (DA) on Monday ordered the depopulation of 6,000 pigs in a Bulacan farm in northern Philippines believed to have been affected by the Ebola Reston virus.

Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said the pigs were from a farm in the town of Pandi and would be killed to prevent the spread of the virus.

"In Pandi, Bulacan, there are traces and evidence of an on-going viral transmission. And for that reason we are ordering the depopulation of the herd," Yap said in a joint-press conference of the DA and the Department of Health (DOH) in Quezon City.

During the depopulation, the pigs would be restricted from going out of the farm before they would be incapacitated, burned, then buried within the premises.

The government said it would observe a “humane killing" of the pigs and prevent human exposure during the process. International observers are also expected to participate in the depopulation.

The Philippine government, through the help of Regional Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) and the United States Centers for Disease Control (US-CDC), tested 160 pig blood samples: 133 of which came from the Bulacan farm and 27 from the Pangasinan farm.

Of the 133 blood samples from Bulacan, 19 tested positive for ERV. Meanwhile, none of 27 samples from Pangasinan were affected. The results prompted the government to order the depopulation of the pigs from the Bulacan pig farm and lifted the quarantine in the Pangasinan farm.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III quelled fears that humans could be afflicted with the virus, saying that the Ebola Reston virus "remains a low risk to human health at this time." Duque added that ERV remains the only strain not to cause significant illness to humans.

Despite the slaughtering of 6,000 pigs, the government agencies assured that it would not have any adverse effects to the stock supply in the country as the number would only account for less than one percent of the total 15-million pig stock in the Philippines.

Yap also assured that there were no "abnormal deaths" in the farms but that they were just depopulating as a "precautionary measure" to make sure the virus would not spread out further.

A health scare erupted in December last year when the DA and the DOH announced that at least one hog farmer in Central Luzon was found to have been infected.

But only several traces of the virus were left in the victim’s body, an indication that his body was able to fight off the virus.

The following month, the government announced four additional cases of hog farmers contracting the virus. All farmers, the DA assured, are in good health condition.

Monday’s announcement came days after the agency barred the importation of cattle from China and poultry from Belgium, following confirmed cases of foot-and-mouth disease and the avian flu. - GMANews.TV
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 24, 2009, 05:03:47 AM
Monday, February 23, 2009Print This Page
Livestock, Meat Industries Exported P3.3B in 2008
PHILIPPINES - Livestock and meat to the value of 3.3 billion pesos were exported last year.



Sun Star reports officials saying that 3.3 billion worth of livestock and assorted frozen meat products worth 3.3 billion pesos (PHP) were shipped from General Santos City to other parts of the country last year.

In his annual state of the city address, Mayor Pedro Acharon pointed out the city sent out PHP 1.4 billion worth of livestock and PHP 1.9 billion worth of assorted frozen meat products.

"Our [livestock] and meat products still hold a significant market share in the local and foreign trading," he said.

For live animals, there were 199,659 swine shipped out in 2008 with a value of PHP 1.1 billion; 6,765 head of cattle for PHP 175.9 million and 4,907 heads of carabaos for PHP 98.1 million, the city mayor said.

For frozen meat products, pork reached 13,000 tonnes with a value of PHP 1.4 billion; beef generated PHP 385.7 million with a volume of 962.6 tonnes, and poultry (chicken) products was valued at PHP 99.3 million at a volume of 1,100 tonnes, the mayor said.

The city has 37 piggeries, 46 poultry farms, two poultry dressing plants and one private abattoir.

Widely known as the 'Tuna Capital of the Philippines', General Santos City also has several swine farms accredited to export cut pork meat products to Singapore.

However, the maiden shipment was aborted in December following the confirmation of the Ebola Reston virus in some provinces in Luzon.

Dr Antonio Ephraim Marin, city veterinarian, said General Santos was the second largest swine producer last year in the country, next only to Bulacan, reports Sun Star.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 25, 2009, 04:28:19 AM
, February 24, 2009Print This Page
Hog Farmers Say Pork Safe for Human Consumption
PHILIPPINES - Amid the scare triggered by the Ebola Reston virus (ERV) in pigs, a group of hog farmers in the country today assured the public that locally-produced pork and pork products are safe for human consumption – except those that are coming from a hog farm in Pandi town in Bulacan province.



In a QTV Balitanghali report, Albert Lim, president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI), reminded meat consumers not to “misconstrue" the Agriculture department’s order to kill 6,000 pigs in a farm in Pandi, saying the virus was confined in that facility.

“We are also apprehensive that if we keep on talking about this thing, some people might just misconstrue or misunderstand what they are talking about at baka matakot sila talaga [and people might get scared]," Lim said.

At the 18th Hog Farmers Convention in Club Filipino, Lim said the mere mention of Ebola scares people.

Also, he noted that the infection issue is still preventing them from exporting pork products.

According to GMA News.tv, agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap had said the “depopulation" move for some 6,000 pigs in Bulacan could not limit local pork stock, as the bulk represents only a small percentage of the total 15-million-metric-ton supply.

Despite the assurances, QTV’s Steve Dailisan reported that pork vendors in Mega Q-Mart in Quezon City have noted that more and more meat consumers start to shy away from buying pork.

Secretary Yap has already assured the public that prices of pork have remained stable amid the series of reports about the incidents of ERV in Central Luzon.

For its part, Bureau of Animal Industry director Davinio Catbagan assured owners of the infected farm in Pandi they would be properly indemnified after the depopulation process.

But Mr Catbagan refused to disclose the amount of remuneration they would be getting.

“Fina-finalize na lang ho ang contract [of indemnification]. Siyempre malaking halaga rin ito. Pero the amount dapat ay tamang-tama na if ever mangyari pa ito uli, hindi maabuso ang gobyreno," he said.

[We are finalizing the indemnification contract. But we will make sure the indemnification would not be open to abuse].


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 26, 2009, 05:22:47 AM
Wednesday, February 25, 2009Print This Page
Hogs to be Culled to Stamp Out Ebola Reston Virus
PHILIPPINES - Philippine agriculture authority will start culling roughly 6,000 heads of pigs in a farm in Luzon, northern Philippines in a move to curtail the transmission of Ebola Reston virus and protect the local livestock industry.



In a press briefing held Monday, Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap said that they decided to cull animals in a farm in Bulacan, as test results done by various local and international agencies reveal that viral transmission continues to exist in this farm.

Blood samples collected from humans and pigs in this farm were tested positive for the Ebola strain that is proved to pose non-fatal threat to human health.

The testing was done by a joint mission comprised of Food and Agricultural Organization, the World Animal Health Organization, the World Health Organization and their local counterparts.

The investigation on Ebola strain started last month, as it is the first time in the world that Ebola-Reston virus is found to linger in swine and evidence suggests that the virus might have jumped to hog-farm workers from the sick pigs.

Mr Yap assured that the culling won't affect meat supply in the country as the number is less than one per cent of the total hog population in the Philippines. There are over 10 million hogs being raised all over the country.

The Philippines is one of the world's biggest pork consumers and pork is one of the main protein sources among Filipinos.

Mr Yap said that the joint mission recommended this "management imperative" on the back of a possible pig to human transmission of Ebola-Reston virus.

Philippine Health Secretary earlier assured the public that the Ebola-Reston so far will not cause significant illness to humans.

Five people with regular contact with hogs were found to carry the anti-bodies of Ebola-Reston virus, which means they were infected by the strain but have fully recovered without apparent syndromes.

Experts of international agencies said they will continue to study the Ebola strain to know how it can be controlled.

"We can't speculate. We don't know the source of this virus, how it's being transmitted. We're studying that," said Soe Nyunt-U, WHO Representative in the Philippines.

"We support the Bureau of Animal Industry to expand surveillance in other areas," said Kazuyuki Tsurumi, FAO Representative in the Philippines
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 27, 2009, 03:10:09 AM
Thursday, February 26, 2009Print This Page
No Sign of Salmonella Outbreak in Hogs
PHILIPPINES - There is no salmonella outbreak in Region 8, announced Dr. Archie Lluz, Chief of Regional Animal Disease and Diagnostic Laboratory of the Department of Agriculture (DA) in the region.



Dr Lluz said that the results of the laboratory examination on specimens sent to Philippine Animal Health Center at the Bureau of Animal Industry in Manila proved to be negative of salmonella.

The results were identified as "Pasteurella hemolytica" a type of bacterial infection that reportedly causes deaths of swine and is due to bad sanitation and changes in weather conditions, Dr Lluz told ABS-CBN News.

Pigs with this infection reportedly suffer form loss of appetite, dehydration, fever and diarrhea.

Dr Lluz was referring to the specimens from Tacloban and Babatngon where cases of sick pigs were reported.

In Babatngon, there were 270 reported swine deaths due to this condition.

Swine vaccinations were already conducted to avoid the spread of the diseases.

Dr Lluz said, however, that there remains possibility that some of the dead hogs contracted hog cholera. He said, however that this has yet to be confirmed.

He also said, however, that hog raisers should immediately report sick pigs to local government veterinarians so that necessary measures could immediately be taken.

Never butcher hogs that are sick, Dr Lluz also warned. He said this will only make the spread of the disease easier and wider. Also, the sick hogs must be isolated from the healthy ones, he advised.

He said hog raisiers should always see to it that the environment where the swine are should be sanitary and clean. Dr Lluz said that those affected were those raised in backyard pens and not really those in hog farms.

The agriculture department has received reports of sick hogs and early slaughtering from Babatngon, Tacloban City, Alangalang, Sta. Fe, Palo, Pastrana, Dagami, Burauen, Tabontabon, Lapaz, Mayorga, and Abuyog in Leyte; Sogod in Southern Leyte; Catbalogan, Calbiga, Daram, and Sta. Rita in Samar; and Lope de Vega in Northern Samar.

Agricultural officials in the region reported that hog diseases have spread to 18 towns and one city in Eastern Visayas this month and have affected thousands of backyard hog raisers in the region.

DA officials said that unrestricted slaughtering of sick animals has triggered the spread of swine diseases.

Pork vendors in Tacloban are already complaining. They said there is a marked decrease in their sales because many consumers now refrain from buying pork for fear of salmonella.

There is no salmonella outbreak yet, reiterated DA officials. They also said that this type of infection can be treated by antibiotics.


 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 27, 2009, 03:11:30 AM
Thursday, February 26, 2009Print This Page
DA 6: Western Visayas Pork is Ebola Reston-free
PHILIPPINES - Pork consumers in Western Visayas have nothing to fear with the reported ebola reston virus which was reported to have infected several hog farms in Luzon.



Dr. Jonic Natividad, Regional Quarantine Veterinary Officer of the Department of Agriculture in Region 6 said, "It is still safe to eat pork" emphasizing that per their monitoring, our region is still free from the threats of ebola reston.

Earlier, the Department of Health (DoH) in the region disclosed in their advisory that ebola reston is a non-pathogenic virus. Dr. Glenn Alonsabe, Regional Epidemiologist of DOH 6 said the virus is heat sensitive and can be killed "by cooking your food thoroughly".

During the PIA interview, Dr. Natividad said that the DA will conduct a meeting with "our meat dealers especially those importing meat products in the region in order to make sure that we have a safe products sold in the market".

As precaution, Dr. Natividad urged consumers to buy their pork products from accredited meat establishments.

Meanwhile, DA 6 Director Larry Nacionales said that Western Visayas has long been declared as foot and mouth disease free, and they are implementing measures to protect the hog industry from ebola reston virus.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 28, 2009, 04:03:58 AM
Friday, February 27, 2009Print This Page
Culling of Pigs with Ebola Strain to Take a Week
PHILIPPINES - The culling of 6,000 pigs infected with the Ebola Reston virus in Pandi, Bulacan will push through on Saturday (28 February).



Health and agriculture officials said the pigs will be electrocuted, then buried in a 30-meter pit inside the farm.

ABS-CBN News reports that the media will not be allowed to cover the culling ordered by the government to prevent the possible spread of the disease.

The Department of Health (DOH) said this will also minimise human exposure to the sick pigs.

Health officials said the Ebola Reston virus poses no serious risks to humans.

The DOH said six pig farm workers have tested positive for Ebola Reston, but are in good health.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 01, 2009, 02:21:28 PM
27 February 2009] Another slaughterhouse worker from Northern Philippines has tested positive for antibodies to the Ebola Reston virus (ERV), bringing the total to six. Philippine health officials said that the presence of antibodies indicates that he may have been infected with the virus in the past, although he had no direct contact with sick pigs. Scientists are still trying to determine whether the six caught the virus from pigs. Health Secretary Francisco Duque said experts fear that unless the spread of the ERV is curbed there is a possibility that the virus could mutate into fatal subtypes. The Philippines is already set to depopulate the farm in Bulacan which tested positive for the virus and which shows continued viral transmission to prevent further spread of the virus.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 03:21:32 AM
Monday, March 02, 2009Print This Page
Mass Pig Slaughter to Fight Ebola Commences
PHILIPPINES - Health and Agriculture officials arrived at a Filipino farm yesterday to begin slaughtering around 6,000 pigs to prevent the spread of the Ebola-Reston virus.



Security was tight with police checkpoints set up in Bulacan province to prevent reporters from getting close to the farm where traces of the non-lethal virus had been detected.

To keep outsiders away police secured even houses near the farm, reports The Manila Times.

Eric Tayag, head of the National Epidemiology Center, told reporters that an electric stun gun would be used to kill the pigs after which the carcasses would be burned and then buried.

He said they expected to cull only about 500 pigs Sunday but hoped later to slaughter a thousand a day, to complete the process within a week.

Aircraft were prevented from flying over the farm, Tayag said as he turned down a request from a local television station to shoot the scene from the air.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the strain infecting the pigs is not dangerous to humans, unlike the four deadly Ebola subtypes found in Africa.

The government earlier imposed quarantine on two farms in Bulacan and Pangasinan provinces after samples found some pigs were carrying the Ebola-Reston strain, reports The Manila Times. It was later found that the spread of the virus was only continuing in the farm in Pandi town, Bulacan province.

The strain was first found in laboratory monkeys exported from the Philippines to the US in 1989.

So far, six farm workers and butchers have been found with the antibodies to Ebola-Reston and scientists are still trying to determine if the six caught the virus from pigs.

If such a link is proved it would be the first time humans have contracted the disease from pigs.

Meanwhile.... Public Seeks Assurance
The National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI) has assured the public of adequate supply of pork in the market amid threats of the virus.

In an interview on dzRB “Radyo ng Bayan,”, Mr Albert Lim, NFHFI president, said it is safe to eat pork and, despite reports that the virus is progressing, the supply chain is not affected.

He said despite the recent report of the virus progressing in Bulacan and Pampanga, farm-gate price of pork remains at P170 a kilo, indicating that the report has not affected the demand.

“The future is bright for the hog industry. The Philippines is a pork-eating country and Filipinos loves pork. Our pork is safe and the consumer can enjoy eating their favorite dish from pork,” he said.

While unfazed by the report that 6,000 swine in Bulacan had to be exterminated, Mr Lim also said the NFHFI is closely coordinating with several government agencies, led by the Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Animal Industry, the Department of Health, the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization concerning the ERV to prevent outbreak.

The NFHFI will seek an audience with concerned DA officials to know the mechanism for the indemnification of hog raisers affected by the virus, according to news agency BusinessMirror

“We are also asking our members in Bulacan to monitor their hogs and coordinate with the Bureau of Animal Industry to prevent possible outbreak,” he said.

Amid new threats brought about by the ERV, hog farmers are now busy preparing for the 18th Annual Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits from 23-25 April, which will be held at the World Trade Center in Pasay.

The annual event is the biggest and longest-running trade exhibition focusing on the hog industry. It aims to gather thousands of commercial and backyard hog raisers from all over the country. The gathering is free to the public and welcomes those who are thinking of setting up their own businesses.

This year’s theme, “Leading the Way to Self-sufficiency and Sustainability in Pork Production,” aims to provide participants with practical and technical know-how in ensuring the safety and profitability of swine farming.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 03:31:18 AM
[2 March 2009] The Philippine Department of Agriculture is expanding the scope of testing for the Ebola Reston virus (ERV) to include the whole of Central Luzon and the Calabarzon regions, which are big pig producing areas, following the continued infection of a farm in Bulacan province that tested positive for ERV last year. Bureau of Animal Industry Director Davinio Catbagan said they expect the expanded testing to be completed within six months, however the agency is still awaiting the arrival of tests kits from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mr Catbagan said they currently have 10,000 kits and that a further 26,000 kits are needed to complete the expanded testing.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 01:56:04 PM
2 March 2009] Roughly 300 kg of tainted meat were confiscated at a local public market in Pasay City in the Philippines. Local officials said the meat was being loaded when it was seized and that the meat did pass through a legal slaughterhouse. It also lacked the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) certification, proof that the meat is safe for consumption. The Philippine Department of Health has already been urging Filipinos to buy only meat certified by the NMIS, amid the scare of diseases in the country. Meanwhile, the NMIS has been intensifying its efforts to control the sale of unsafe pork.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 02:13:28 PM
The Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA), local health and agricultural teams Sunday have started slaughtering, burning and burying roughly 6,000 hogs in a farm in Pandi, Bulacan, in Central Luzon on Sunday amid the Asian virus scare, as a precautionary measure and to protect the local livestock industry.

“We culled around 300 heads—piglets and growers—in two and a half hours; we tried to start the process at 5 p.m. Sunday; after three hours we disposed of 442 hogs; that includes transporting the hogs to an area in the farm where they will be disposed of; with this rate and with some improvements in the procedure tomorrow, we expect to complete the depopulation by Wednesday,” Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) head Davinio Catbagan said.

But according to Dr. Eric Tayag, the 56-man team's five captive bolts used in stunning the pigs malfunctioned, for which reason, they decided use instead .32 caliber pistols. "We need to finish this off because sometimes it rains," he said.

The culling was witnessed by representatives from FAO, the WHO, animal welfare observers, Bulacan Gov. Joselito Mendoza and Pandi Mayor Roberto Oca, Mr Catbagan said Monday. The slaughter was estimated to cost P16 million, which include hog farm owners' compensation and the cost of culling for five to seven days.

"State compensation for the owner cannot be [100% of the market price.] A range of about 25%-50%, but it has to be discussed [with the farm owner]. At 25%-50%, the government may pay the farm owner P6.28 million-P15.625 million, plus the cost of animal culling operations," said Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap.

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to check the virus' presence was conducted by the US CDC to verify ongoing transmission. "Of 160 pig blood samples that were positive for antibodies, 133 came from Bulacan and 27 from Pangasinan as reported by RITM. Those from Bulacan were traced to pigs at different age groups while those in Pangasinan were found in sows and just one piglet. This means that there is on going viral transmission in Bulacan but past infection with recovery was the case in Pangasinan,” DA Secretary Arthur Yap explained.

The agriculture officials earlier announced that the depopulation will be carried out in a “humane” manner, following current Office international des épizooties (OIE) procedures that ensure protection of animal welfare in the Bulacan farm. According to DOH Secretary Francisco Duque, the quarantine of the hog farm in Palauig, Manaoag, Pangasinan has been lifted after finding no traces of viral transmission.

According to DA Secretary Arthur C. Yap, test results conducted by a joint mission of Food and Agricultural Organization, the World Animal Health Organization, the World Health Organization and their local counterparts, reveal that viral transmission continues to exist in Pandi hog farms, which is only 0.5% of the 13 million pigs raised throughout the country.

Philippine Department of Health (DOH) officials also say a pig farm worker in Cabanatuan City in Nueva Ecija, who had no direct contact with sick hogs, has tested positive for Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the Reston ebolavirus (ERV), which is non-lethal, unlike the Zaïre, Bundibugyo (Uganda), Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa and Sudan strains, according to FAO.

“The additional positive human sample, showed signs of antibodies for Ebola-Reston, was traced to a slaughterhouse male worker and was not sick during visits by the investigation team. He does not recall any direct contact with sick pigs but remembers having flu-like sickness in the past twelve months," a DOH statement said, also confirming four pig farm workers and a butcher from Bulacan and Pangasinan tested positive for the antibodies last month.

"Ebola-Reston poses a low risk to human health at this time," said DOH Secretary Dr Duque. "147 human samples have been tested for Ebola, but only six have tested positive. But stay away from kilawin, and half-cooked pork," he added. The laboratory tests of 147 blood samples from workers in the affected areas were conducted by the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) and the United States Center for Disease Control (US-CDC). RITM has also reported that "1039 pig blood samples collected by the expert mission yielded negative results on antigen tests," the DOH said.

The 24 other workers tested were all found negative for ERV infection. “To date, all close contacts of humans with positive anti-bodies who were tested remained anti-body-free signifying absence of illness in affected humans that can lead to possible human-to-human transmission,” Dr Duque said. The RITM and the US-CDC also tested 160 pig blood samples: 133 of which came from the Bulacan farm and 27 from the Pangasinan farm; of the 133 blood samples from Bulacan, 19 tested positive for ERV; none of 27 samples from Pangasinan were affected.

 
Map of Bulacan showing the location of PandiGlobal experts said they will continue to conduct research studies of the Ebola strain to determine how it can be controlled. FAO of the United Nations has initially committed P10 million to buy additional kits. "We support the Bureau of Animal Industry to expand surveillance in other areas," said Kazuyuki Tsurumi, FAO Representative in the Philippines. "We have not committed any amount of money... [but] we are ready to support a wider surveillance and capacity-building for more tests," Tsurumi explained.

"We can't speculate. We don't know the source of this virus, how it's being transmitted. We're studying that," said Soe Nyunt-U, WHO Representative in the Philippines. "Our current issue is that the test kits are limited because we are depending on the [United States] CDC [Center for Disease Control and Prevention] to send those kits. If we are going to extend the surveillance both in the animal and human side, we need more test kits," he added.

Both the DA and DOH officials have decided to expand the scope of the testing for the Ebola-Reston virus by inspecting and monitoring hog farms in the whole of Central Luzon, Calabarzon, Southern Luzon and Pangasinan province after the slaughter of the 6,000 infected pigs." As a precautionary measure, while there are many questions left unanswered, these ERV-contaminated pigs should be extinguished so we can move forward and study the virus," said the DA's Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) Director Davinio "Dave" Catbagan.

"In six months we might be finished testing Regions 3 and 4 depending on the assurance of the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention [in Atlanta, Georgia, USA] to give test kits. In Region 3 alone, the government would need to test farms in 566 villages that would require around 36,000 kits, but the country only has 10,000 kits" Mr. Catbagan said. "The expanded tests will cover the provinces of Aurora, Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Tarlac and Zambales in Central Luzon, and Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal and Quezon in Calabarzon," Mr. Catbagan added.

Mr. Catbagan has assured infected hog farm owners in Pandi they would be properly indemnified after the country's first large-scale animal depopulation process. "We are finalizing the indemnification contract. But we will make sure the indemnification would not be open to abuse," he said. Fatteners and piglets cost an average of 3,000-4,000 pesos per head, boars cost 25,000-30,000 pesos, and sows cost 14,000-15,000 pesos.

 
Intensively farmed pigs in batch pensJuan Lubroth, senior officer of the Infectious Disease Group of FAO’s Animal Health Service, has arrived on Wednesday to discuss in detail with government officials how the agency can support in the wider surveillance. The DA and DOH officials and other government agencies have met on Thursday to discuss and finalize the procedure in the burning of 6,000 pigs in Pandi, Bulacan.

"The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) and the provincial government of Bulacan, experts carrying out the 500,000 pesos five-day depopulation would observe three guidelines, namely: the main disposal, water safety, and environment protection. The depopulation process will involve stunning the pigs unconscious, burning them in a 6-foot deep pit, then burying them at the site. We want to make sure that our means would not violate the Animal Welfare Act. We are also ensuring that there would be no seepage," Governor Mendoza explained.

"Local authorities have decided to use electric prods and a P 70,000 captive bolt pistol with a blunt rod (also variously known as a cattle gun, stunbolt gun, bolt gun, or stunner) to stun the 6,000 pigs in Pandi, prior to slaughter burning using rice hulls before burying them in a pit dug inside the hog farm," said Dr. Davinio Catbagan.

"About 40 health workers – clad in special hog mask suits and are tasked to facilitate the depopulation – would then dump the pigs into 10 30x30-foot pits that can accommodate 600 pigs each. The pits are located some 30 feet from the infected pig farm," said Mr Eric Tayag, head of the National Epidemiology Centre. "The cull could take up to seven days to complete," Mr Tayag added. A truckload of disinfectants was prepared amid rice husks to be used in the burning.

The Pandi culling will be the first large-scale depopulation because of a disease, Samuel B. Animas, chief of BAI’s animal health division. "Only one to three pigs are slaughtered at a time in backyard farms during the foot and mouth disease infection [in the 1990s]," he added. Rising cases of dengue fever (in Malaysia), chikungunya (in Singapore), bird flu (in China and Vietnam) and ebola viruses were reported in several Asian countries in the past two months, causing the "diseases of globalization” scare.

Meanwhile, in the 18th hog farmers convention launched on Monday at Club Filipino, National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc. (NFHFI) President Albert R. T. Lim, Jr. said hog raisers have feared the effects of Ebola Reston virus on industry, since hog exports are banned due to the infection issue. “We are also apprehensive that if we keep on talking about this thing, some people might just misconstrue or misunderstand what they are talking about and people might get scared," Lim said.

The government has spent about 10 million pesos to maintain the two quarantined hog farms in Bulacan and Pangasinan. “Anyway, we always have our hog producers in Mindanao to supply Luzon if necessary. I am more concerned about our exports although the Ebola scare also somewhat affected local demand,” Lim said.

Amid nationwide ERV scare and probe, local authorities have seized more than 200 kilograms of rotten pork meat at a local market in Pasay City Wednesday. Barangay officials in Maricaban district have intercepted the banned ‘hot meat’ and arrested Roberto Clet and Rafael Fruelda, who were indicted under the "Consumer Act of the Philippines." The statute punishes the illegal sale of unsafe products like double-dead meat with penalty of P1,000 to P10,000 and not less than six-months but not more than five years of imprisonment.

 
Transmission Electron Micrograph of the Ebola Virus.Local police has also arrested four vendors and seized their 3,000 kilos of "botcha" (rotten pork meat or "double dead meat") at MC Market in Balintawak, Quezon City Wednesday evening, and allegedly delivered from Bulacan. The four suspects were charged for violation of the Consumer Act of the Philippines and Republic Act 9296 or the Meat Inspection Code.

In December, International experts have investigated the deadly Ebola Reston virus outbreak wherein about 6,000 pigs at Pandi and Talavera farms had been tested for the Ebola-Reston virus.

"There is no salmonella outbreak in Eastern Visayas, Region 8, said Dr. Archie Lluz, Chief of Regional Animal Disease and Diagnostic Laboratory of the Department of Agriculture (DA) in the region. But hog specimens from Leyte and Babatngon (270 reported swine deaths) where cases of sick pigs were reported, were examined by lab tests. The results revealed cutaneous "Pasteurella hemolytica", a type of bacterial infection which causes swine deaths due to loss of appetite, dehydration, fever and diarrhea.

According to the Department of Agriculture, sick pigs had been culled from Babatngon, Tacloban City, Alangalang, Sta. Fe, Palo, Pastrana, Dagami, Burauen, Tabontabon, Lapaz, Mayorga, and Abuyog in Leyte; Sogod in Southern Leyte; Catbalogan, Calbiga, Daram, and Sta. Rita in Samar; and Lope de Vega in Northern Samar|. Swine infections have spread to 18 towns and one city in Eastern Visayas.

The Reston ebolavirus is suspected of being either another subtype of the Ebola or a new filovirus of Asian origin. It was first discovered in crab-eating macaques originating in the Philippines, from Hazleton Laboratories (now Covance) in 1989. This discovery attracted significant media attention and led to the publication of The Hot Zone. There was then, an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever among monkeys imported from the Philippines to Reston, Virginia. The Ebola-Reston strain was discovered among Philippine monkeys in the U.S. again in 1990 and 1996, and in Italy in 1992.

African strains of the virus caused deaths of about 50 percent to 90 percent of those infected with prior symptoms of lethal bleeding and organ failure, the World Health Organization said. “Since the 1970s, scientists, veterinarians, microbiologists and physicians have been looking at thousands of species to see if they can find this elusive reservoir, and we have been pretty much empty-handed,” Juan Lubroth, head of infectious diseases in the animal health unit of the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome, explained.

"Unlike the three subtypes, Zaire, Sudan and Ivory Coast, which can cause hemorrhagic symptoms, Reston does not. There has been no evidence that Reston can cause significant illness in humans. When Reston was previously found in monkeys, few animal handlers were infected but only one had very mild symptoms," the Philippine Department of Health (DOH) official website statement on the virus announced.

In January 1997, The Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources had ordered the immediate slaughter of some 600 monkeys in Ferlite, a breeding farm in Laguna, to prevent an outbreak of the deadly Ebola Reston strain virus.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 02:26:31 PM
Hog culling to cost P16 million
THIS WEEK’S culling of at least 6,000 hogs in a farm north of Metro Manila this week following a confirmed outbreak of the non-lethal Ebola Reston may cost the state about P16 million-P17 million, according to estimates by hog industry participants.


Heavily armed police prevent people from entering the site where 6,000 Ebola Reston-infected pigs would be slaughtered in Pandi, Bulacan province, north of Manila. The government was set to slaughter 6,000 pigs on a farm where the non-lethal virus has been found in the animals and its antibodies in humans, health officials said. — AFPThe expense would include compensation for the hog farm owner and the cost of culling for five to seven days. The activity would be the first disease-related large-scale destruction of domestic animals.

The Agriculture department is mum on the actual compensation for the farm owner.

"The amount should just be right such that if other cases like these happens, the government will not be abused just right to prevent hog farmers from [not reporting] the disease," Davinio P. Catbagan, director of the Bureau of Animal Industry, said last week.

Asked how much would the state compensate the owner, Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap said: "it cannot be [100% of the market price.] A range of about 25%-50%, but it has to be discussed [with the farm owner]."

At 25%-50%, the government may pay the farm owner P6.28 million-P15.625 million, plus the cost of animal culling operations.

Richard G. Yu, president of the Bulacan Swine and Poultry Producers Association, estimated that a farm equal to the size of the Pandi operations might have some 25 boars and 500-600 sows, while the remaining are fatteners of all ages.

Fatteners and piglets, at current market prices, are worth P3,000-P4,000 apiece on the average, while boars cost P25,000-P30,000, and sows are sold at P14,000-P15,000, Albert R. T. Lim, Jr., president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., told BusinessWorld.

Boars and sows are priced higher compared with the fatteners as the breeders are responsible for the quality of hogs the farms produce.

Based on market estimates, buying all 6,000 hogs will cost P25.15 million-P31.25 million — P625,000-P750,000 for the boars, P8.4 million-P9 million for the sows and P16.125 million-P21.5 million for the fatteners.

Furthermore, the slaughter of hogs, which will involve stunning the pigs unconscious, burning them in a pit, and burying them at the site, would need around P500,000.

About 40 health workers and 30 farm workers were tasked to depopulate the farm, which was set to start yesterday.

The hog farm would undergo another inspection in the next six months to recheck the presence of the virus. — Neil Jerome C. Morales

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 03, 2009, 02:47:11 PM
PETA heartbreak: Wailing of hungry pigs


By Carmela Reyes, Riza T. Olchondra
Central Luzon Desk
First Posted 05:18:00 03/03/2009

Filed Under: Plant and Animal Diseases, Animals, Consumer Issues, Health


PANDI, BULACAN—One of the things that broke the hearts of animal lovers who witnessed the officially sanctioned killing of hundreds of pigs infected with the Ebola-Reston virus (ERV) was that the hogs were not fed for days before they were destroyed.

“We understand that the owner ran out of (funds) to sustain the feeding and that is more painful,” said Anna Cabrera, program director of the Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS).

“The sound of wailing pigs filled the farm when the animals were led out because they had not been fed for days and this is what really made us cry,” Cabrera said in English and Filipino.

Bureau of Animal Industry Director Davinio Catbagan said that after the culling in Bulacan, tests would be done in other farms all over the province.

Other farms to be tested

Testing will later be expanded to the whole of Central Luzon and the Calabarzon (Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal and Quezon).

Catbagan said farms in the two regions would have been tested within six months with the help of international health experts.

According to the World Health Organization, the strain of the Ebola virus infecting the hogs in Bulacan is not dangerous to humans, unlike the four deadly subtypes found in Africa.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said the virus was considered posing minimal threat to humans, noting that the six people who have tested positive for antibodies only showed mild flu symptoms and have completely recovered.

However, he said that all unusual sickness and death in pigs should be reported to authorities, and this should be combined with cautious handling of carcasses, prohibiting the entry of double dead meat in the food chain and proper cooking of food.

The government imposed quarantine on two farms in Pandi, Bulacan, and Manaoag, Pangasinan, late last year after samples found some pigs infected with the virus. It was later found that the spread of the virus was only continuing in the farm in Pandi.

Philippines only

The strain was first found in laboratory monkeys exported from the Philippines to the United States in 1989.

Officials say the Philippines is believed to be the first country in the world where the Ebola-Reston virus has been detected in pigs.

Scientists are still trying to determine if the six caught the virus from hogs.

Health experts are still studying how hogs contracted the virus and if they can pass it on to humans or vice-versa.

No effect on prices

The culling of 6,000 hogs in the town of Pandi is not expected to negatively affect the supply and price of pork, hog industry players said.

The 6,000 represent only about 0.05 percent of the 13 million hogs being raised in the country, according to industry data.

“Anyway, we always have our hog producers in Mindanao to supply Luzon, if necessary,” National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. president Albert R. T. Lim said in an interview.

According to Bureau of Agricultural Statistics data, pork prices have remained stable with pork ham staying at P170 per kilogram since last month.

The price of chicken, which consumers commonly turn to when avoiding pork, in fact declined from P130 per kg (for whole chicken) to P120 per kg.

Gandhi invoked

An international animal rights group on Monday quoted the Indian advocate of nonviolence, Mahatma Gandhi, in appealing to the government for humane treatment of the infected pigs.

In a letter, the People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) reminded Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap that it was no less than Gandhi who said that: “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by how they treat their animals.”

“I urge you to prove the Philippines to be the compassionate nation we know it to be, and secure humane treatment of these animals immediately,” Rochelle Regodon, campaigns manager of PETA Asia-Pacific, said in the letter e-mailed to Yap Monday.

Another concern

PETA expressed concern that the pigs scheduled for killing were not being fed before their culling.

“(PETA) would like to request that your department immediately intervene and secure the humane treatment of the remaining animals over the next two days,” Regodon said.

Regodon said “failure to provide feed to these animals is in direct violation of the Animal Welfare Act of 1998 (Republic Act No. 8485).” With reports from Nikko Dizon and Jerome Aning
 

 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 04, 2009, 03:00:32 AM
Tuesday, March 03, 2009Print This Page
Culling of Pigs Expected to Happen on Schedule
PHILIPPINES - The National Epidemiology Center (NEC) of the Department of Health and the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) expect to finish the depopulation of some 6,000 pigs from a farm in Pandi, Bulacan on Wednesday.



BAI Director, Davinio Catbagan Jr., said that on Sunday, they had killed and buried 472 Ebola Reston virus pig carriers on Sunday.

Mr Catbagan said that they expect to shift to a higher gear today, with their killing, burning and burying to be done in the morning and afternoon, according to The Manila Times.

Mr Catbagan said that they hope to be able to achieve more than the target 500 a day.

Because of this, Mr Catbagan said, they can more than double their speed, and expect to finish it by Wednesday.

NEC Director Dr Eric Tayag assured the public that the buried pigs could not be excavated since it is buried below the ground and inside the farm itself.

He added that access to the farm is also limited.

Pigs to be Shot if Stunning Proves a Failure
The number of pigs culled turned out to be 1,237 by day two at a farm in Pandi, Bulacan, reports ABS-CBN News.

Bulacan's provincial health officer, Dr. Joy Gomez, who is also the spokesperson for the depopulation committee, reported Tuesday morning that the big increase in number from 442 yesterday is due to the adjustments and lessons learned from the procedures in last Sunday's dry-run.

According to Dr Gomez, depopulation teams started working around three in the afternoon on Monday and ended at past eight in the evening with 795 pigs culled.

Stunning, through the use of a captive bolt, is still the method used to cull the pigs.

New photos and videos were also released to media showing workers unloading pigs on the pit, workers taking tissue samples on pigs' carcasses, and the actual burning of culled pigs.

At Bocaue Public Market, which is two towns away from Pandi, Governor Jonjon Mendoza on Tuesday checked if the contamination of Ebola Reston virus at a farm in Pandi has affected pork sales in public markets of the province.

It turned out that pork sales were at a low even before the virus contamination was publicised.

Meanwhile, in the Markets
Meanwhile, Business World reports that the agriculture department plans to ask hog industry leaders next month to review their prices in a bid to spur currently dampened consumption.

"There is already reduced consumption people are shying away from pork products," Agriculture Assistant Secretary Salvador S. Salacup said in a telephone interview yesterday.

Mr Salacup said the drop in pork consumption resulted from a confluence of the Lenten season, the Ebola Reston scare, and high pork prices.

But Renato R. Eleria, chairman of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., said in a separate phone interview that "the occasional drop in consumption is not because of the Ebola Reston, but because retail prices have not gone down."

Pork prices rose to P160 per kilogram to P190/kg. last week from P150-P190/kg. in January and from P145-P170/kg. in end-December because of high feed prices, Bureau of Agricultural Statistics data show.

Meanwhile, prices of corn, the main ingredient in animal feeds, rose to P21/kg. late in January fromP13-14/kg. in early January and from P12/kg. in December amid tight supply. Retail prices of corn were at P22.25/kg. late in February. The private sector shipped 100,000 metric tons of corn from Brazil and 120,000 MT of feed wheat — a feed ingredient used as a substitute for corn — from Ukraine last month to address the shortage. Mr. Eleria said farm-gate prices have fallen this month by P5/kg. from P110/kg. in January, but retail prices have yet to adjust accordingly.

The department will review cost of production and effects of the Ebola Reston scare on consumption, Mr Salacup said.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 05, 2009, 01:47:40 AM
Wednesday, March 04, 2009Print This Page
Bulacan Hog Industry will Recover After Culling
PHILIPPINES - Bulacan Governor Joselito Mendoza said today he is optimistic that the dying hog industry in the province will recover as soon as the government is done with the culling of the Ebola Reston-infected pigs in Pandi town.



"Just like in the past when pigs were struck by FMD (food and mouth disease), the hog industry was able to recover," Mr Mendoza told ABS-CBN's morning show, "Umagang Kay Ganda."

Mr Mendoza on Tuesday said that the already troubled hog industry in the province was aggravated by the Ebola Reston scare, bringing down the sales of pork by 50 a whopping per cent.

"When I went around [public markets] yesterday (Tuesday), vendors told me that pork sales dropped by 50 per cent. Market vendors selling eight pigs a day are now selling only four," the governor said.

Mr Mendoza said hog traders around the province told him that pork sales have been cut to half since the Department of Health (DOH) revealed the Ebola Reston infection in pigs from farm in Pandi town.

The governor, however, said that he is expecting the hog industry in the province to recover as soon as the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) finishes the culling of the Ebola Reston-infected pigs in Pandi town this week.

He said a total of 2,662 pigs have been killed and he expects the BAI to finish the culling of more than 3,000 more infected pigs by Friday.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 05, 2009, 02:56:16 PM
DOH to conduct nationwide random tests on hog farms for Reston virus

MANILA,(PNA) – The Department of Health (DOH) will expand the random tests for Ebola Reston Virus (ERV) on pigs raised in hog farms scattered nationwide.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said the random testing will be conducted as early this week because they are still not aware on the extent of infection of the ERV on other hog farms in the country.

“If we fail to identify the extent of the transmission of the virus, the possibility of virus mutation arises. This means that a more dangerous virus can evolve from ERV," Duque said.

DOH-National Epidemiology Center (NEC) director Eric Tayag admitted there are still a lot of piggeries that remain untested for ERV.

“The joint committee on ERV has agreed to conduct the tests as soon as possible. We also need to intensify our monitoring and surveillance operations on hog farms,” Tayag said.

The DOH and Agriculture department earlier ordered the depopulation of some 6,000 pigs from a hog farm in Pandi, Bulacan where experts found an “ongoing transmission” of the virus.

Both Duque and Tayag stressed the need to contain the virus in the earliest time to prevent more humans from getting infected by ERV.

As of Thursday, 31 persons have reportedly been infected by the virus. However, all of them did not show any changes in their bodies or have been sick due to the transmission.

Health experts said those infected were only found positive for Immunoglobulin (IgG) antibodies which signified that their bodies have effectively mounted a protective defense against the ERV.

Although those infected do not manifest any sign of disease, all of them are now under strict observation.

Experts from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) who are here in the Philippines to study the ERV incident have admitted that they still uncertain on the real effects of the virus to the human's body.

The FAO experts said only infections can occur but there is no serious clinical disease based on their observations.

Meanwhile, agencies concerned in the depopulation met last Wednesday to set the standards in killing and burning the 6,000 pigs from Winfarm in Pandi town.

The DOH said the procedure should meet with international standards, avoid animal to human transmission, and make sure that the ashes from the burning will not spread through air.

The government has assured the owners of Winfarm in Pandi town that it will fairly compensate their losses from the depopulation.

While there is still no evidence linking the ERV transmission from eating pork, the DOH advised those who will consume pig meat to cook it properly.

He said consumers should always look for the seal of the National Meat Inspection Service when buying pork so they will be assured that it passed safety tests of the government.

The DA has setup checkpoints in North Luzon to guard the possible entry of "double-dead" meat in Manila.

Swine industry is second highest in the country’s the P1.3 trillion agriculture industry. Hog earnings have reach P150 billion second to palay industry with P160 billion in 2008.(PNA)
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 06, 2009, 01:08:22 AM
Thursday, March 05, 2009Print This Page
Workers Culling Pigs Complain of Headaches
PHILIPPINES - Authorities will try to complete the culling of 6,000 pigs infected with Ebola-Reston virus at a Pandi, Bulacan piggery by Friday.



As of Wednesday - day 4 of the culling - a total of 4,741 pigs were culled, reports ABS-CBN News.

"We hope to finish it by tomorrow [Friday]," said Dr Eldrin Morales of Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), who is also the field commander at the culling operations.

"We just can't compare yesterday's operation with this morning's because the ones that were culled yesterday were piglets," said Dr. Morales.

The Depopulation Committee also clarified that the dizziness and headaches workers are experiencing are not related to the exposure of Ebola-infected pigs.

If the culling is finished by Friday, disinfection on the infected farm can begin by weekend.

"We're looking at the possibility of sending a different set of team for the disinfection," said Dr. Morales.

Workers Getting Aid from Bulacan Government
Bulacan Governor Jonjon Mendoza inspected the culling of Ebola Reston-virus infected pigs in the province.

According to the news agency, he also checked the condition of workers affected by the temporary closure of the hog farm.

Aside from rice and groceries, the local government has given the more than 30 workers, P10,000 livelihood assistance as well as scholarships for their children.

Mr Mendoza also continues to assure consumers that pork from other farms in Pandi, Bulacan are safe since hogs from only one hog farm were infected with the virus.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 07, 2009, 04:32:01 AM
Friday, March 06, 2009Print This Page
'Double Dead' Pork Seized in Balintawak
PHILIPPINES - The National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) on Thursday seized a ton of "double dead" pork in a surprise inspection at a public market in Quezon City.



Inspectors of the NMIS found several batches of rancid meat, popularly called "botcha," concealed inside plastic bags and weaved baskets while others were being sold in cartons along sidewalks near MC Market in Balintawak.

ABS-CBN News reports that the meat inspectors also seized 60 kilograms of India buffalo meat.

Last week, the NMIS seized 3,000 kilos of rotten pork meat at the public market.

NMIS authorities said the rotten pork, which may have been carved from sick pigs, are discolored, cold, and was being sold at almost P50 lower than the regular market price.

The meat also did not have an NMIS seal, making it unfit for consumption. Indian buffalo meat, meanwhile, is supposedly banned from the market because cow slaughter is illegal in India.

Dr. Eduardo Oblena, NMIS officer-in-charge, said the rotten meat would cause several diseases if eaten.

Dr. Oblena also urged the local government to exert more effort in curbing the rampant sale of 'hot meat' in several markets, especially in Balintawak.

The confiscated meat, meanwhile, will be buried to prevent further sale.

Under the Consumer Act of the Philippines, the illegal sale of unsafe products like double-dead meat has a corresponding penalty of P1,000 to P10,000 and not less than six months but not more than five years of imprisonment
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 07, 2009, 04:43:44 AM
 
Philippines to keep tariff quota for US pork
[6 March 2009] The Philippine government has been forced to take back its threat to severely restrict pork imports by denying permits to legitimate pork importers after US pork producers, through the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC), requested the Office of the US Trade representative to remove the Philippines from the US Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). Under the GSP, designed to provide developing countries like the Philippines with preferential duty access to the US market, the Philippines was able to export USD 1.1 billion of goods to the US. The NPPC said the Philippine decision to maintain its current tariff rate quota administration rules preserves a growing market for US pork exports. In 2008, US pork imports to the Philippines grew 360% to 25,300 tonnes valued at USD 46 million. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 10, 2009, 12:43:08 AM
Monday, March 09, 2009Print This Page
Culling of Ebola-infected Pigs Comes to an End
PHILIPPINES - The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) on Saturday started disinfecting a hog farm in Pandi town, Bulacan province, after completing the culling of more than 6,000 pigs infected with the Ebola Reston virus.



BAI Director Davino Catbagan said a total of 6,210 infected pigs were culled in the six operational days, which started last Sunday. The depopulation in the Pandi farm was declared complete at 8:15 p.m. Friday, according to ABS-CBN News.

"Cleaning and disinfection of the farm premises will start Saturday," Mr Catbagan said, adding that the disinfection process will last for another week.

Officials said the hog farm's operation will resume three to six months after the disinfection.

Mr Catbagan said after the disinfection, the BAI and the Department of Health (DOH) will move to other farms around Central Luzon and Southern Tagalog to make sure pigs in the regions are also safe from the Ebola Reston virus.

After the Pandi hog farm, we will check other hog farms and backyard farms," he said.

Dr Eric Tayag, DOH spokesman and chief of the National Epidemiology Center, said the six hog farm workers in Pandi who have tested positive for the Ebola Reston virus would have to be closely monitored for the next 21 days.

Dr Tayag said the infected farm workers have been advised to regularly check their body temperatures during the monitoring. He said the farm workers remained healthy.

The DOH, meanwhile, advised that the government has not lifted the voluntary ban on the exporting of pork products to other countries.

It, however, clarified that it is still safe to eat pork.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 10, 2009, 08:08:06 AM
 News
rssPhilippine AI swine disease check initiated 06 Mar 2009
The Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) is to establish a registration and accreditation system for artificial insemination (AI) centres and providers to prevent the spreading of swine diseases such as the Ebola Reston virus.
Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap directed the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), an attached agency of the DA, to formulate the registration and accreditation system in consultation with stakeholders.

“Based on scientific studies, Ebola Reston and the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome can be transmitted through unchecked, uncertified semen and poor AI techniques,” said Yap in a memorandum.

PRRS & Ebola Reston
Yap noted the decision to have a registration and accreditation system for AI centres and providers was made after the losses caused by a typical PRRS and the detection of the Ebola Reston virus in pigs in farms in Pangasinan and Bulacan.

AI, a technology that promotes genetic improvement among pigs, is accepted in many areas of the country and has contributed to the growth of the swine industry. “While recognising its importance in genetic improvement, AI’s role on disease transmission should also be reviewed in the light of emerging swine diseases,” said Yap.
 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 12, 2009, 01:48:56 AM
Wednesday, March 11, 2009Print This Page
Contaminated Pork Seized in Angeles City
PHILIPPINES - Some 70 kilos of pork meat believed contaminated with hog cholera disease were seized by personnel from the city veterinary office before it was sold to the public, authorities said.



The owner of the "hot" meat was not mentioned in the report, but veterinary officials immediately separated the contaminated meat from the rest of newly-slaughtered hogs to avoid spread of the disease.

ABS-CBN News reports that Rolando Espino, meat inspector ll, initially discovered the contaminated meat at the slaughter house. He noticed red dots on the hog skin that prompoted him to call the attention of his superior.

Mr Espino said a resident veterinarian found out that the meat is afflicted with hog cholera disease and prevented it from being delivered to the public market to protect consumers.

The veterinary office also recommended the burning of the seized meat. It warned hog dealers to examine livestock being brought to slaughter house to avoid similar incident.

Mr Espino urged the public to immediately report the sale of infected meat.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 14, 2009, 05:32:02 AM
Friday, March 13, 2009Print This Page
Zamboanga Pigs Die of Swine Flu Virus
PHILIPPINES - The death of a dozen pigs last week in barangay Vitali, 72 kilometers east of this city, was caused by mainly swine flu and not the Ebola Reston virus as earlier feared by people in the city.



This were the findings of a team of experts from the Department of Agriculture (DA), city veterinarian and city health offices that went to Vitali and conducted an on-site investigation, according to Filipino news agency BusinessMirror.

Apart from swine flu, other possible causes of the death were Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), Classical Swine Fever, Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae, Salmonellosism Enzootic and Heat Stroke, said Dr Mario Ariola, chief of the city veterinarian office.

DA regional director Oscar Parawan and veterinarian Dr. Marie France Jalao, of the DA regional office that was part of the team, corroborated Ariola’s pronouncement.

Mr Parawan said swine flu is a common disease in hogs that requires proper medication to prevent complications from bacteria that lead to the death of the pigs. He said they also discovered that water in Vitali where the pigs died contains E. coli that can complicate infection when mixed with food eaten by hogs.

City health officer Dr Rodel Agbulos also disclosed that the five-year-old child who died at same time as the pigs suffered severe dehydration caused by infectious diarrhea, and not from eating pork infected by the virus as earlier feared by people in the city.

The team also found out that the owner of the swine that died had sold the meat to the community and this caused diarrhea and other symptoms of one family and eventually led to the death of one child.

Dr Agbulos said other findings showed that the water source of the family has high E. coli content that might have also led to diarrhea and severe dehydration.

Dr Ariola said the pigs that died belong to three households. The pigs were not vaccinated and consequently exhibited nasal discharges, fever, sudden weakness and death within two days.

Seven of the 12 pigs that died are piglets and five sows of which three were pregnant, according to Dr Ariola.

The team has come up with recommendations to double-check these findings since the members have not been able to come up with a definitive diagnosis.

The recommendations include continuous close monitoring of the situation in the affected areas; collection of blood and tissue samples of sick pigs; information and education campaign on swine management; advisory on meat-safety consumption; and intensified meat-inspection measures.

“We cannot come up with a definitive diagnosis since we were not able to observe any sick pigs in the visited areas and necropsy was not performed,” Dr Ariola disclosed.

Mr Parawan said they expect to receive any time soon the results of analysis of blood samples taken from the pigs in Vitali and sent to Manila for laboratory tests.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 14, 2009, 05:33:48 AM
Friday, March 13, 2009Print This Page
Bulacan Officials Feast on Ebola Reston-free Pigs
PHILIPINES - After clearing a hog farm in Bulacan province of Ebola Reston-infected pigs, local officials recently gathered and dug into virus-free roasted pigs.



The Bulacan provincial government said "It’s fiesta time!" in Pandi town after the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) finished culling thousands of pigs that were found infected with the potent Ebola Reston virus.

After the BAI's announcement of the culling’s completion last Friday, Bulacan Governor Joselito Mendoza prepared several roasted pigs for the members of the province's peace and order council.

Mr Mendoza, joined by the chief executives of Pandit, Pulilan and Plaridel town, local police officials and health officials, including Dr. Eric Tayag of the National Epidemiology Center, dug into crispy, juicy roasted hogs after the peace and order council.

The Bulacan government said the roasted pig feast is a sort of thanksgiving after the clearing of a Pandi pig farm, which was affected by the virus.

A total of 6,210 infected pigs were slaughtered by the BAI in a week-long culling operation at the Pandi hog farm, reports ABS-CBN News.

BAI Director Davino Catbagan said the bureau and the Department of Health immediately started "disinfecting" the hog farm last Saturday. The disinfection will last for another week, he said.

Officials said the hog farm's operation will resume three to six months after the disinfection.

Mr Catbagan said the BAI and the Department of Health (DOH) will move to other farms around Bulacan, Central Luzon and Southern Tagalog to make sure pigs in the areas are also safe from the Ebola Reston virus.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 15, 2009, 11:17:25 PM
Deodorize Pig Manure With Fedgrozyme
The neighbors of Hipolito “Jun” F. Saoyao of Linapaw; Tubao, La Union used to complain about the obnoxious odor of the manure of his pigs. But he was helpless as he did not know vet how to eliminate the foul odor, and was convinced that it was inevitable in swine production.

In a seminar on livestock production and management, however, this 54-year-old farmer, municipal councilor and chairman of the Agriculture Committee of the Tubao Sangguniang Bayan has learned from Dr. Jovita Datum, a livestock expert and head of the Ilocos Integrated Agriculture Research Center, that the offensive odor of swine manure could be eliminated by adding an enzyme-based solution called Fedgrozyme to the feeds.

Fedgrozyme is developed by Berlin trained industrial microbiologist Dr. Ronaldo A. Sumaoang, who is also the president and CEO of the Novatech Group of Companies. It is manufactured by Novatech Vet and Biologicals, which also produces other veterinary and biological products.

According to Dr. Sumaoang, Fedgrozyme eliminates the odor of the manure by lessening the ammonia emitted by the manure. Likewise, the protein that is still present in the manure continues to be degraded by Fedgrozyme microbial activity. Fedgrozyme is actually a stabilized source of potent enzyme of microbial origin for animal use, Dr. Sumaoang adds. It contains immobilized biological microorganisms, organic acids, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, phospholipids, and UGF.

Jun said that during the seminar Dr. Datum also introduced the use of Biosec as a very effective method of turning animal waste into organic fertilizer.

Most of the participants of the seminar, however, could hardly believe Dr. Datum’s pronouncements, according to Jun. Yet, he wanted to deodorize the manure of his swine so his neighbors would no longer say something against him and at the same time, make money by selling organic fertilizer from the decomposed pig’s manure. Hence, hc bought 5 kg of Fedgrozyme and 1 kg of Biosec.

He was eager to tell his wife about Fedgrozyme and Biosec, but when she had heard of it, she had concluded that these would just be an additional expense.

After three days his wife “was already singing a different tune” for the obnoxious odor of the manure was gone. And when they started to sell the first bag of organic fertilizer from the decomposed pig manure, his wife became more enthusiastic and started to gather the manure herself whenever he had other matters to attend to.

“That is how effective Fedgrozyme is in eliminating the foul odor of the manure,” Jun said.

For swine pre-starters and starters, he mixes 1.5 kg of Fedgrozyme per ton of feeds. For older pigs, he mixes only 1 kg of Fedgrozyme per ton of feeds.

He has observed that pigs given feeds mixed with Fedgrozyme grow faster and are heavier. The pig’s feed conversion ratio (FCR) has improved by 8 percent to 10 percent, and average daily gain has increased by 4.5 percent. Litter size has also improved. He adds that the market vendor who buys his fatteners has told him that their back fat is not thick, and this is the kind of pork that consumers prefer.

Marianito Garinggo, a police officer in Tubao proper, is also very pleased with the effects of Fedgrozyme.

His piggery is practically a stone’s throw away from the municipal building so he was told to do something about the foul odor of his farm or else he would be forced to close it. Worse, he was throwing his pigs’ manure to the irrigation system, making the environmental condition more unpleasant for the municipal employees and his neighbors.

When the municipal sanitary inspector heard of the improved environmental condition in Jun’s farm, he told Marianito to consult Jun. And right away, Jun sold Marianito 1 kg of Fedgrozyme and, presto, his problem was solved. After a week, he bought 1 kg again, and in two months he had already bought 4 kg.

Fedgrozyme is used also in the farm of Tubao Mayor Noemi Balloquing. Her caretaker, Jovito Bualan, has started to use it last July and much has improved since then. For one thing, he said, the foul odor is gone. And for another, the pigs become healthier unlike in the past when they were afflicted by diseases. Mayor Balloquing is, of course, very satisfied with the performance of her pigs.

So try using Fedgrozyme, and you’ll find that your neighbors have nothing anymore to say against you.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 17, 2009, 01:55:36 AM
Monday, March 16, 2009Print This Page
More Spoiled Pig Meat Seized in Balintawak
PHILIPPINES - Authorities seized more than 200 kilos of spoiled "double dead" meat at the MC Market in Balintawak, Quezon City Monday.



Police said they discovered the spoiled meat inside a red Nissan pick-up (TEA-858) parked outside the market past 1 a.m. They said they towed the vehicle to Quezon City Police District Station 1 where they will await the owner.

Under the Consumer Act of the Philippines, the illegal sale of unsafe products like double-dead meat has a corresponding penalty of P1,000 to P10,000 and not less than six months but not more than five years of imprisonment

On 5 March, the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) seized a ton of "double dead" pork in a surprise inspection in the same public market in Balintawak, reports ABS-CBN News. NMIS inspectors found several batches of rancid meat, popularly called "botcha," concealed inside plastic bags and weaved baskets inside MC Market.

The meat inspectors also seized 60 kilograms of India buffalo meat.

NMIS authorities said the rotten pork, which may have been carved from sick pigs, are discolored, cold, and was being sold at almost P50 lower than the regular market price.

The meat also did not have an NMIS seal, making it unfit for consumption. India buffalo meat, meanwhile, is supposedly banned from the market because cow slaughter is illegal in India.

An NMIS official said the rotten meat would cause several diseases if eaten.

Officials of NMIS, the Bureau of Animal Industry and local government units earlier said it will target the sources of hot meat to protect consumers.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 17, 2009, 01:57:09 AM
Monday, March 16, 2009Print This Page
Philippines Puts More Hog Farms under Surveillance
PHILIPPINES - A Philippine animal industry official said on Friday that thousands of backyard hog farms were under surveillance in an attempt to protect the livestock sector from the Ebola-Reston virus, which was found to linger in the country's swine population.


Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) Director Davinio Catbagan said the surveillance work and testing will involve some 30,000 pigs in backyard piggeries in parts of the major Luzon island, home to at least three million pigs.

Last week, Philippine agriculture authorities culled 6,000 hogs in a farm in Bulacan province north of the national capital Metro Manila.

Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said that they decided to cull these pigs as test results done by various local and international agencies reveal that viral transmission continues to exist in this farm. Blood samples collected from humans and pigs in this farm tested positive for Ebola-Reston virus, the strain that has yet to cause serious diseases to the human.

The WHO (World Health Organization) classified the incident as "posing low public health risk" in its assessment earlier this year.

Mr Catbagan said Secretary Yap will ask the US government to ensure the supply of the test kits for the sampling of the 30,000 pigs covered by the surveillance work.

A joint mission comprised of Food and Agricultural Organization, the World Animal Health Organization (OIE), the WHO and their local counterparts came to the Philippines after the world's first case of Ebola-Reston on hogs was detected last October here.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 23, 2009, 08:08:27 AM
KORONADAL CITY — A team from North Cotabato flew to Thailand recently in a bid to penetrate the foreign meat market through major Thai conglomerate Charoen Pokphand Group.

North Cotabato Vice Governor Emmanuel F. Piñol led the team that left for Bangkok to meet with top officials of Charoen Pokphand, which has interest in agribusiness, retail, and telecommunication industries.

“CP [Charoen Pokhand] is looking for chicken and hog meat suppliers, and we are offering the province as a source for their needs. We do not only have the capability to produce the hogs but even the raw materials needed for feeds which is essential to the production of export quality hog meat,” Piñol said in a statement.

North Cotabato’s intention to foray in the foreign pork market came as Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap ordered the killing of some 6,000 hogs in Bulacan province in Luzon. The hogs were believed to have been infected with the Ebola reston virus. North Cotabato is an estimated 560 miles south of Bulacan.

The country, through Mindanao, was set to have its pilot foreign pork shipment last December to Singapore but stopped after the discovery of the Ebola reston virus in Luzon.

Piñol appeared optimistic on the foreign prospects of the province’s swine industry despite the presence of the Ebola reston virus in the country.

“This is a very big opportunity for us in our effort to continuously provide better income opportunities for our people in the province,” Piñol said, hoping positive results in the meeting with Charoen Pokhand officials.

Also earlier, the agriculture department in Central Mindanao confirmed the outbreak of hog cholera in three North Cotabato towns that have been quarantined to last until late in March.

The invitation to Bangkok came through the Land Bank of the Philippines, which is considering the implementation of an ongoing concept called “Integrated Piggery and Poultry Project for Exports in North Cotabato.”

Source: Sun Star

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 24, 2009, 12:48:41 AM
Monday, March 23, 2009Print This Page
Producers Seek to Postpone Free Trade
PHILIPPINES - Poultry and pig farmers want the start of the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA) to be postponed in the light of the current global economic situation.



The Philippines is reportedly pushing for the delay of the full implementation of the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA) in light of the current global economic recession, according to Philippines Star.

Trade and Industry Secretary Peter Favila has been talking to his ASEAN counterparts about delaying the full implementation of the AFTA by January 2010.

As agreed under AFTA, the Philippines and its ASEAN partners must bring down to between zero and five percent all tariff covers.

While most of the other ASEAN signatories to the AFTA are reportedly receptive to the delay, Singapore is opposed to any change in the timetable and is supposedly pushing for the implementation of the agreement as scheduled.

Unfortunately for the Philippines, several industries in the agriculture sector are still not ready for competition.

According to Gregorio San Diego of the United Broilers and Raisers Association (UBRA) and Albert Lim of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI), the poultry, egg and hog industries, as well as the rice sector, are still not ready for the full implementation of AFTA by January 2010.

In an interview with The Star, Mr San Diego and Mr Lim expressed their joint concern about the fast approaching implementation of AFTA in 10 months.

Mr San Diego said that the poultry and egg sector is asking President Arroyo to take action now and declare a 'moratorium' on the implementation of the AFTA agreement.

He added that the Philippine poultry and egg sector cannot still effectively complete against Thailand and Malaysia, which are major exporters of poultry. The Philippine poultry and egg sectors should be placed in the sensitive list along with rice, he said.

He explained to The Star that, while Malaysia and Thailand may still be affected by the bird flu virus, they would eventually recover and the Philippines would be swamped with Thai and Malaysian poultry and egg exports.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 28, 2009, 07:20:29 AM
Friday, March 27, 2009Print This Page
Hog Cholera Behind Death of Zamboanga Pigs
PHILIPPINES - Its official: the swine industry of the Filipino southern port city is free from the Ebola Reston virus.



Mayor Celso Lobregat declared so, citing that tests yielded negative of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), Pseudo Rabies Virus (PRV) and Swine Influenza Virus (SIV-H1N1).

The test results that arrived this week were certified by the Philippine Animal Center of the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), which also conducted the tests on serum samples from dead swines sent by the Office of the City Veterinarian here.

The samples were taken from a dozen pigs that died early this month in barangay Vitali, 72 kilometers east of this city, reports BusinessMirror. The situation caused undue alarm that it was an outbreak of the Ebola Reston virus.

Mayor Lobregat disclosed that five of the eight samples sent tested positive for the Classical Swine Fever, or hog cholera, a highly contagious disease of pigs that usually results in the death of the animal 15 days after it is infected.

He enjoined hog raisers to practice health management and husbandry to prevent the spread of hog cholera that could have a very bad impact on the swine industry.

He told hog raisers to submit their pigs to regular vaccinations and deworming, and keep pigpens and its surroundings cool, dry and clean. He also asked them to feed pigs with unspoiled food and clean water, and report to the city veterinarian any health problem of their animals.

Similarly, the mayor warned hog raisers not to slaughter and sell sick swine and other livestock, as this may harm the consumers and expose them to diseases.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 03, 2009, 02:14:25 AM
 Home > Nation > Top Stories DA bans entry of cattle from Taiwan, Lebanon
04/01/2009 | 03:31 PM

Email this | Email the Editor | Print | ShareThisMANILA, Philippines - The Department of Agriculture (DA) has banned the importation of cattle and other animals from Taiwan and Lebanon following the outbreaks of the food and mouth disease (FMD) in those countries.

Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap issued the ban after the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) or World Animal Health Organization confirmed the outbreaks.

In Lebanon, FMD was detected in a dairy cattle farm in the province of Kamed El-Iouz, and in Taiwan, the disease affected swine farms in the Maoliao township, Yun-Lin and Beidou town in Chang-hua.

The ban also suspends the processing, evaluation of the application and issuance of Veterinary Quarantine Clearance (VQC) to import these animals from Lebanon and Taiwan.

DA veterinary quarantine officers and inspectors were also ordered to confiscate animals and their by products from the two countries.

FMD is a highly contagious viral disease that strikes cloven-hoofed animals.

Earlier, DA also imposed a ban on imports of cattle and other FMD-susceptible animals from China after OIE confirmed outbreaks in Hubei and Xinjiang.

Government wants the OIE to certify Luzon as FMD-free to pave the way for the global declaration of the Philippines as an FMD-free country.

“A global declaration of the country’s FMD-free status will help Filipino hog producers penetrate the export market and make the Philippines a viable site for halal food production," Yap had noted.

Luzon is the only remaining area in the country that has not yet been declared by the OIE as FMD-free, according to Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) officials.

BAI director Davinio Catbagan said the OIE had already declared as FMD-free the entire Mindanao in May 2001, as well as Masbate, Palawan, and the entire Visayas in the same month the following year.

The DA aims to secure OIE certification for most of Luzon as FMD-free "without vaccination," while the regions of Central Luzon and the Cavite-Laguna-Batangas-Rizal-Quezon or Calabarzon area as FMD-free areas with vaccination.

Catbagan pointed out that the Philippines has not had an FMD outbreak in more than three years.

The last case of FMD was reported in Lucban, Quezon on December 28, 2005. - GMANews.TV
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 27, 2009, 09:53:57 AM

Philippine pork production dips in 2008
[27 April 2009] Disease, high production and marketing costs, bad weather are just among the problems that led to a 1.06% decline in Philippine pork production in 2008. DA Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup said during the opening ceremonies of the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc (NFHFI)'s 18th Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits on Thursday. Mr Salacup said pork production dipped to 1.86 million tonnes from 1.9 million tonnes in 2007. Nevertheless, the local hog industry managed to contribute PHP 150 billion (USD 3.09 billion ) to the economy. He assured the local hog industry that the Department of Agriculture will continue to provide support to and reinforce the sector and “guarantee the future progress of the Filipino hog industry.” 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 29, 2009, 02:49:10 AM
Monday, April 27, 2009Print This Page
New Biogas Generator Helps Farmers
PHILIPPINES - The government is urging pig and poultry farmers to adapt gas-fed generators to run on biogas, and simple technology is already available for the conversion.



To contribute to a cleaner environment and help cushion the adverse effects of global warming, owners of piggery and poultry farms are being urged by the Department of Science and Technology to make use of a technology that easily converts gas-fed generators into biogas generators, according to Manila Bulletin.

In an interview with the publication, Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI) environment division chief, Dr Christopher Silverio, said they have developed a small gadget dubbed the new energy adaptor (NEA) that could convert a gas-fed generator into a methane or biogas generator.

He said the institute targets piggery and poultry farms in rural areas as the primary users of the technology, adding that an owner of a piggery farm in Mindoro has already expressed interest in the technology.

"[Mindoro} will be the first one to adopt the technology," he said, adding that it is expected to adopt the technology within the year.

Dr Silverio said the NEA gadget that could convert a 13 horsepower generator only costs 300 pesos (PHP) since the raw materials used to produce the technology are locally available.

"It is customized depending on the capacity of the generator," he said, adding that the technology has already been filed for patent before the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) of the Philippines.

In addition to the adapter, Dr Silverio's team also developed the energy facilitated adopter (EFA), which can convert a gas-fed generator into a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) generator.

Both the EFA and NEA are fabricated from PVC materials, which could facilitate the intake of methane or LPG into air-intake combustion port of the generator.

"These simple gadgets would run a generator without the use of gasoline," he said, adding that such generators can power electrical appliances like exhaust fans, light and refrigerators, among others.

"With these simple conversion kits, electric operators would run their generating units with either biogas or LPG instead of gasoline. In effect, operation would be more cost effective," Dr Silverio told Manila Bulletin.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 29, 2009, 02:59:02 AM
 Philippines fails to secure FMD-free status
[28 April 2009] The Philippines has again failed to receive its FMD-free status with vaccination after the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE) turned down its request, said National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc President Albert Lim. Mr Lim said the OIE wants the Philippines to seek FMD-free without vaccination status. Already the Visayas and Mindanao have been certified FMD-free without vaccination by the OIE, but some hog farms in Luzon are still vaccinating against the disease as a precautionary measure. Mr Lim said Batangas province only recently stopped vaccination, but Bulacan province is still vaccinating. Bulacan farmers are are hesitant to completely stop FMD vaccination especially with its recent bout with the Ebola Reston Virus. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 30, 2009, 07:56:19 AM
Wednesday, April 29, 2009Print This Page
Future Ban on GM Products Would Threaten Farming
PHILIPPINES - A future ban on genetically modified (GM) products in the province of Negros Occidental could lead to the collapse of the livestock and poultry industries, a leading veterinarian has warned.



Visaya Daily Star reports that provincial veterinarian, Renante Decena, has warned of the imminent collapse of the livestock, poultry and game fowl industries of Negros Occidental if the province bans GM products.

Almost 90 per cent of the ingredients for poultry and livestock feeds needed in Negros Occidental are imported, with the majority having been genetically modified, he said.

The average feed consumption needed by Negros Occidental is 140 tonnes per day, 91.5 tonnes of which is corn, while the remaining 40 per cent is made up of soybeans, wheat, fishmeal, vitamins and minerals, he said..

The 91.5 tonnes of corn is needed for an estimated one million broilers, four million game birds, 500,000 layers, 800,000 million ducks and geese and 400,000 pigs, Dr Decena said.

The provincial government has recently ordered the shipping out of GM corn brought into Negros Occidental, in compliance with an ordinance banning GM products in the province.

Dr Decena noted that Negros Occidental imports 100 per cent of its soybeans, sorghum and wheat meal, and 90 per cent of its corn needs for feeds, most of which are GM.

A meeting to address the feed problem a meeting with stakeholders is scheduled for later this week, he said. If stakeholders seek a moratorium on the GM ban, it will depend on the Office of the Governor, Dr Decena added.

Governor Isidro Zayco said the provincial government has to enforce the ordinance banning GMO products in Negros Occidental because it is duty-bound to do so, reports Visaya Daily Star. However, he said that stakeholders with objections may submit their position papers to the provincial government for consideration.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 30, 2009, 09:15:59 AM
29 April 2009] The Philippine hog sector and the country's meat processing sector are at odds as to the implementation of the AFTA next year. At the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc (NFHFI) 18th Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits in Manila, NHFHI President Albert R.T. Lim reiterated his call for a five-year delay in the implementation of the AFTA saying that the local hog industry could face collapse in the light of stiff competition from its neighbouring countries like Thailand. On the other hand, the country's meat processors welcome the AFTA implementation, saying it would open export markets for the local meat processors and would also facilitate the importation of vital raw materials for their industry.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 30, 2009, 11:18:48 PM
Thursday, April 30, 2009Print This Page
Philippines Province GM Feed Ban to Stay
PHILIPPINES - Despite opposition from livestock and poultry farmers, the ban of genetically modified (GM) products, including feed ingredients, remains in place in the province of Negros Occidental.



Despite concerns raised by hog raisers over the possible shortage in feeds for livestock and poultry, Negros Occidental Governor Isidro Zayco said they would continue to enforce the ban on GM corn, reports Philippine Daily Inquirer.

Governor Zayco said on 29 April that the provincial government would stand by its resolve to enforce a ban on GM products.

But Rodney Ta-ala, president of the Alliance of Hog Raisers in Negros Occidental, said the ban on GM products would kill the livestock and poultry industry in Negros Occidental.

Mr Ta-ala noted that other provinces did not ban GM products.

Governor Zayco, however, called as highly speculative the claim that the poultry and livestock industries will collapse if the GM ban is not lifted. He maintained that the fears were unfounded because GM-free corn was available to meet the feed requirement of the industry.

He cited the report of Negros Occidental provincial agriculturist, Igmedio Tabianan, that there were available sources of GM-free corn in Bukidnon.

There will be no collapse of the poultry and livestock industry if they just import available non-GM corn, Mr Tabianan said. He added that organic farmers of Bukidnon could provide Negros Occidental 1,000 tons of GM-free corn a day until the end of June.

After June, he said the Bukidnon organic farmers would have 900,000 tons of hybrid corn available.

Businessmen know where to access GM-free corn if they wanted but they insisted on GM corn because of its high fructose content that enabled the faster fattening of livestock and poultry, Tabianan said.

But Mr Ta-ala maintained that Tabianan's claim that there was adequate GM-free corn for feeds available to be brought into Negros Occidental was wrong since they needed 915 tons of corn a day.

He also noted that the GM ban was in conflict with the food security programme of the Negros Occidental provincial government.

While the provincial government promoted livestock raising in Negros Occidental at a fair last month, it is killing the livestock industry because of the ban on GM corn, Mr Ta-ala told Philippine Daily Inquirer.

Governor Zayco recently ordered that about five shipments of allegedly GM corn intended for feeds be shipped out of Negros Occidental. However, he said they would amend the ordinance if those complaining against the ban could submit position papers showing that GM products were not harmful to the health of people and those opposed to GM agree with them.

Mr Tabianan earlier said that there was no conclusive evidence that GM products affect humans but research showed that GM food tested on rats has caused inflation of kidneys and increased blood sugar. The GM ban also provided Negrense farmers an opportunity to produce more corn needed for poultry and livestock in the province, he added.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 30, 2009, 11:23:31 PM
[29 April 2009] US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will lead an agribusiness trade and investment mission to the Philippines in May, said U.S. Agricultural Counselor Emiko Purdy at the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc (NFHFI) 18th Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits in Manila. Ms Purdy said the will seek to promote trade and investment opportunities particularly in the fisheries, livestock genetics, meat and poultry, dairy products, agricultural machineries and equipment, fertiliser, processed goods, beverages and biofuels sector. Two-way trade of agricultural products between the Philippines and the U.S. reached almost USD 3 billion in 2008, up 44% from 2007's USD 2 billion.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 02, 2009, 03:37:36 AM
[1 May 2009] Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap has directed the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) to closely monitor swine handlers and other people in close contact with swine farms to detect the possible presence of the H1N1 virus now causing illness and even death among humans in various countries. Mr Yap said that the BAI would have to immediately report to the DOH any illness exhibited by animal handlers and other people in close contact with swine farms. He also directed the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) to step up surveillance work with focus on monitoring movements of hogs and pork products and preventing the entry of sick pigs or “double dead” meat in the human food chain.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 09, 2009, 01:35:48 AM
Philippines to lift ban on imported meat products
[8 May 2009] Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said the temporary ban on importation of pork meat products will be lifted after international authorities clarified that A (H1N1) does not come from pigs. The only exception will be Canada which has confirmed that some pigs have been infected by humans. Mr Yap is waiting for information from the Office Internationale des Epizooties before lifting the ban on imports from Canada.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 09, 2009, 01:17:06 PM
Misamis hog prices down by 50 percent/ May 6, 2009
LITO RULONA

MISAMIS Oriental––Provincial board members have sounded alarm bells over how the swine flu scare has affected the prices of hogs in the province.

"Halos magulang na lang sa pangayo ang pagpalit sa baboy didto sa bukid kay hinay na ang halin sa karneng baboy sa kamerkadu-han," said Peter Unabia, a member of the provincial board.

The provincial board's agriculture committee said the buying price of hogs in the province plunged from P30 to P15 a kilo.

He said meat vendors also complained because sales went down by 50 percent.
Provincial board member Wayne Militante said the scare has adversely affected the local market despite information campaigns being carried out by the Department of Health (DOH) and the Department of Agriculture (DA).

The health department, for instance, stopped calling it ``swine flu.'' The department now refers to it as the H1N1 virus.

Militante said there is nothing to fear since no case of H1N1 infection has been reported here.
The outbreak of the swine flu originated in Mexico but confirmed cases in other parts of the world have markedly increased over the last few weeks.

Militante said the scare has also affected Gingoog City and neighboring towns where many people now opt to buy fish rather than pork.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 12, 2009, 01:28:59 AM
Monday, May 11, 2009Print This Page
Temporary Ban on Canadian Pork Imports Lifted
PHILIPPINES - The Philippine government yesterday announced that a temporary ban on most Canadian pork imports has been lifted as pork consumption is proved not to transmit Influenza A H1N1 virus that has claimed more than 50 lives worldwide.



The lifting of the temporary suspension on pork imports from Canada followed the earlier government move to remove similar trade restrictions on the commodity originating from influenza affected zones in North America where the virus originated and where almost all human death cases were reported.

The Department of Agriculture said, however, pork products coming from Canadian province of Alberta will still be banned for flu concerns.

Davinio Catbagan, head of the department's animal industry bureau, said the swine farm in Alberta is still under quarantine although no pig mortality was reported there. Canada has reported 242 laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death as of 06:00 GMT, 9 May, the World Health Organization said on its website.

The Philippines bought less than 5 per cent of its pork consumption demands from abroad, with Canada being the major source of origin for pork imports.

The Philippines has yet reported any suspected or confirmed Influenza A H1N1 case so far but has put 20 patients under close observation. Fifteen of them were safely discharged from the hospital.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 12, 2009, 11:08:17 AM
LOCAL swine producers are feeling the crunch of the swine flu scare with dipping domestic pork demand, but expressed optimism on market improvement soon, an industry leader said.

This developed as Emilio V. Escobillo Jr., president of the South Cotabato Swine Producers Association (Socospa), also appeared upbeat as government animal experts are addressing concerns on another hog disease — the ebola reston virus — that obstructed the country’s pilot foreign pork shipment last December.

“There’s initial drop [on domestic pork meat demand] due to misconception,” Escobillo confirmed when sought about the effects of swine flu that killed people in Mexico, the United States and in other countries.

“The swine flu could not be transmitted [to humans] through eating of pork meat,” he added.

Cathy M. Romero, sales and marketing officer of Matutum Meat Packing Corp., said demand for pork meat also plunged but declined to attribute it to the swine flu scare.

Matutum Meat operates a P200 million modern swine slaughtering facility in neighboring Polomolok, South Cotabato. It distributes fresh and frozen cut pork meat products to the domestic market.

“Normally this season is lean in as far as pork meat consumption is concerned,” Romero said in a separate interview.

Both Romero and Escobillo did not say how much were the decline in pork meat volume from their buyers.

Matutum Meat, a sister company of Cebu-based Sunpride Foods Inc. which produces Holiday and Sunpride canned goods, is the only processing plant in the country accredited by Singapore to export pork meat products in the island-state.

Last December, cut pork meat products were to be transported to the Singapore when the Department of Agriculture (DA) stopped it due to the discovery of a strain of ebola virus in pig tissue samples coming from four swine farms in the provinces of Bulacan, Pangasinan and Nueva Ecija.

Escobillo said the Bureau of Animal Industry, an attached agency of the Department of Agriculture, is testing hog farms in Mindanao for possible clearance from ebola reston to push forward the country’s foreign foray.

“The BAI promised to finish the ebola testing in three months,” he said.

The ebola reston virus, a subtype of Ebola, was discovered in the Philippines in 1989 among crab-eating macaques exported to the Hazleton Laboratories in Reston, Virginia. (BSS)

Source: Sun Star

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 19, 2009, 01:39:23 AM
Prospects have remained bright for our hog industry as two major initiatives are being worked out to boost export and domestic markets of our local pork products.

First is the impending entry of the Philippine pork products to export markets particularly Singapore. Second is the re-launching of the “Pork-in-a-Box” which aims to provide accessible and affordable meat products to Filipino consumers.

GEARING FOR EXPORT MARKET
Department of Agriculture (DA) Secretary Arthur Yap is optimistic that Philippine meat products can make it in the export markets. Yap who recently visited the Nenita Quality Foods (NQF), a local meat producer in Davao City, was informed that the company is just awaiting for the final accreditation from the Singaporean government for its meat products to enter the Singapore market this year.


In support to the NQF and other local meat producers in the country, Yap has ordered the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) to issue as soon as possible appropriate guidelines and procedures for the accreditation of meat importers, exporters, brokers, traders, and handlers in preparation for meat exports and domestic distribution.

Yap issued an administrative order that would harmonize all procedures and safety nets to enhance the competitiveness of Philippine hog meat and meat products and to facilitate access to profitable export markets.

“This is a critical protocol for our international trading partners to have confidence on our meat products both in the export and domestic markets. We would like to show to the world that Philippine meat producers such as the NQF are now capable of producing world-class products for export,” Yap said.

“Mindanao and Visayas had been internationally declared as FMD-free areas and we would like to capitalize on this advantage,” Yap said adding that his visit and support to the NQF is a demonstration of how serious DA is in supporting private meat producers and in complying with the global standards for producers to enter the global market.

REVIVING “PORK-IN-A-BOX”
The DA is also putting a private sector-backed initiative involving mass production and sale of low-priced and high-quality chilled meat on a fast track by re-launching the “Pork-in-a-Box” program. This program aims to further increase accessibility of safe and hygienic pork products in the market.

The “Pork in a Box” was conceptualized in 2005 as a pork postproduction system that will ensure safety, economy, efficiency, and environmental soundness in the supply chain.

Yap said the program will eliminate transportation of live hogs since only carcass and cut products from Mindanao and Visayas will be transported to markets in Metro Manila.

Yap adds that this will minimize transport costs, provide easy access to quality meat cuts, reduce levels of middlemen and add-on cost in marketing pork products. The program will also help reduce disease occurrences because the transport and shipping of live animals would be minimized once the project is in full swing.

The “Pork-in-a-Box” would also involve sourcing of pork cuts from selected areas in Visayas and in Mindanao particularly in the cities of Iloilo, Bacolod, Cagayan de Oro, Davao, and General Santos.

Based on the observations of “Pork in a Box” players, the program has not taken off so well in the past primarily because consumers do not prefer chilled or frozen pork. With this, DA will identify and strengthen more markets, including supermarkets and institutions for the products. Communication and advocacy strategies will also be conducted for consumers to realize the advantages of cleaner, ‘ safer and cheaper meat products.

“Low-priced, mass-based and high quality are the key words that we should keep in mind in carrying out this project to make it more responsive to the call for food security and support the initiatives of private-sector stakeholders in modernizing the livestock and meat industry by promoting consumption of chilled meat,” Yap stressed.

This time, the program will promote sense of ownership among meat producers through their involvement in the whole supply chain. Yap said there is a need to perfect the supply chain so that fluctuating prices of basic goods such as pork will be stabilized.

“To stabilize supply, you have to take out all the insecurities. You have to assure [buyers and consumers on the] volume of supply, quality, and safety,” he added.’

Yap said that through the “Pork in a Box” program, DA’s goal of reducing prices of wage goods through enhanced production, more efficient logistics and improved retailing linkages would be realized.

These new agribusiness fronts being explored both by the government and the private sector if effectively carried out would work favorably both for the hog raisers and consumers.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 20, 2009, 09:56:22 PM
Hog Raisers Seek Total Pork Import Ban
PHILIPPINES - A party-list congressman representing the livestock industry on Wednesday said the spread of the influenza A(H1N1) virus and pork importation are bringing down the country's hog industry.



AGAP Rep. Nicanor Briones told ABS-CBN's morning show "Umagang Kay Ganda" that compared to the period January to April 2007, the importation of pigs increased by 334 per cent during the same period this year.

Mr Briones said that in the first three months of the year alone, the country already imported 48 million kilos of pork.

"Small-time hog raisers would incur losses," the partylist congressman said, adding that the hog industry loses P2,000 to P3,000 for each pig.

Mr Briones said the Department of Agriculture (DA) should at least ban the importation of pigs from countries affected by H1N1 virus.

DA Secretary Arthur Yap, however, said the government cannot just ban the importation of pork, but promised that he would do everything to protect the country's P150-billion hog industry.

"We can’t just ban the importation of pork without valid reasons. Other export products of the Philippines would be affected," Mr Yap said.

Mr Yap explained that countries that would be affected by an unreasonable hog import ban might retaliate. He said the countries might stop the importation of goods from the Philippines, which will greatly affect the country's export industry.

The agriculture secretary added that the H1N1 virus is not a valid reason to ban pork.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has said that the deadly flu cannot be acquired by eating pork. It said the virus is airborne and is transmitted from human to human.

The WHO's declaration pushed the DA to lift import bans imposed on pork products from Mexico and the United States.

Mr Briones, however, cited Switzerland's total import ban of live hogs and pork products. "How come we can’t do the same?" Briones said.

Mr Yap, meanwhile, said that he would meet with the hog industry's stakeholders before acting on Briones's request.

"I love the [hog] industry, I will do everything to protect it," Mr Yap said. He added if the local industry needs help they could contact him.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 21, 2009, 01:08:24 PM
As in any enterprise, swine meat production is most profitable when resources are used wisely. These resources include feed and labor. As it is, feed costs make up 60% to 70% of the total costs of production and it is prudent to make use of every gram of it. Any venture to reduce feed costs without sacrificing the yield will result in highly favorable returns.

This is where FCE or Food Conversion Efficiency comes in. It is the measure used to show how much. feed is needed for body tissue yield. This is the standard used to measure the production system’s performance. FCE is simply defined as the number of kilograms needed to produce one kilogram of live weight gain.

However, the best FCE does not necessarily equate to the best recourse for the farm. Higher feed quality most often converts to higher body tissue.

In principle, higher feed quality means higher intake, this means better conversion rate. But producers must keep in mind that higher quality feed also means higher feed cost. As such, producers must find the right balance of feed quality and conversion rate to attain optimum profitability for the
operation.

Whether the operation has annual or biannual output, producers should best keep in mind the following profitability equation (Cost per Unit of Gain):

Total costs to run operation for a period / Total weight sold = Cost per unit of gain

When the Cost per unit of gain is compared to returns per unit of sale, profit or loss of the operation can then be derived. Producers are often inclined to cut expenses in operation, especially during this time of economic slump. However, any cuts in production expenditures also affects the operation as a whole, so farmers are best advised to consider the factors on which they cut back. The operation may be able to save money on the short term but may suffer devastating losses in the long run. Again, it’s all a matter of balance. It all boils down to the farmer, and his ability to balance the scale of management and profitability.

Livestock and Poultry Inventory by Year and Animal Type
Year    Hog
2004    12,561.69
2005    12,139.69
20o6    13,046.68
2007    13,459.33
2008    13,701.02

Source : Bureau of Agricultral Statistics(BAS)
Unit : In thousand heads

Annual Farmgate Prices of Agricultural Commodities by Commodity and year
2006     2007     2008
Hogs Upgraded for Slaughter      69.30   71.28    81.08
Source : Bureau of Agricultral Statistics(BAS)
Unit: (peso per kilogram (or as indicated)

Annual Retail Prices of Agricultural Commodities by Commodity and Year
2004     2005     2006     2007    2008
Pork Lean Meat            132.43  139.28  138.44  139.32  156.20
Pork Meat with bones  116.89  124.09  123.35  124.96  141.56
Pork Pata (front)            95.49  101.85  102.32  103.58  117.85
Source : Bureau of Agricultral Statistics(BAS)
Unit: [peso per kilogram (or as indicated)]

Producer Price Index for Agriculture, 2005-2007
2005     2006     2007
Philippines Hog  173.65   167.95   173.00
Unit: Index

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 25, 2009, 01:37:31 AM
PRRS Kills 700 Pigs in Central Luzon
PHILIPPINES - Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has been blamed for the deaths of more than 700 pigs in 15 towns of Pampanga province in the Central Luzon region.



Some 60 barangays districts in 15 towns of Pampanga were affected by the Porcine Reproductive Syndrome (PRRS) virus that killed at least 700 pigs out of the 3,138 animals in the province and affected 170 farmers, according to Business Mirror.

Dr Augusto Baluyut of the Provincial Veterinary Office (PVO) said the PRRS-affected towns are San Luis, Porac, Lubao, Guagua, San Fernando, Santa Ana, Bacolor, San Simon, Minalin, Sasmuan, Mexico, Santa Rita, Santo Tomas, Apalit and Arayat.

However, Dr Baluyut said, as of now the PRRS virus is only active in Guagua and Santa Rita, as the PVO has already neutralised its occurrence in the other towns.

Dr Baluyut shared that the PRRS cases emanated from the two piglets a mattress vendor bought from San Pablo Propio in San Simon. The mattress vendor sold his product in Pangasinan province in exchange for the two piglets.

He added that his office has conducted massive PRRS vaccination on 10,000 pigs and disinfection of PRRS-affected piggeries.

The PVO also collected blood samples from infected pigs which were brought to the Department of Agriculture's laboratory and where the samples were found to have the PRRS virus.

Business Mirror reports that a virus first isolated and classified as an arterivirus in 1991 causes PRRS. The disease was first recognised in the US in the mid-1980s and was called the mystery swine disease or blue ear disease. The virus spreads via a pig's nasal secretions, saliva, faeces and urine. Field studies suggest it can be airborne for up to three kilometers. An infected pig that survives for three months is considered a carrier of the virus. Other pigs may survive longer than three months, although the animal may not be shedding the virus.

Artificial insemination can be a potential means of spreading the virus, if semen from an animal whose blood carries the virus particularly during the first three- to four-week period following the breakdown of the stud. Outside this period field evidence indicates the risk of spread in semen is very low from previously infected groups of boars. Adult animals excrete the virus for much shorter periods of time—14 days—compared with growing pigs, which can excrete for one to two months. PRRSV may infect foetuses from mid-pregnancy onward and is excreted in the pig's salvia, colostrum and milk.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 25, 2009, 01:40:34 AM
Bryan M. Retales New Manager of TOPIGS Philippines
PHILIPPINES - TOPIGS is pleased to announce the appointment of Bryan M. Retales, DMV as manager of TOPIGS Philippines with effect from May 2009.


Bryan M. RetalesMr Retales (34) has been appointed as Chief Operating Officer and has broad experience in the pig industry. Before joining TOPIGS, Mr Retales worked as a marketing manager and a training manager for a pharmaceutical company. He also has experience as manager of a local pig breeding company.

TOPIGS Philippines is one of the county’s leading suppliers of pig genetics. The headquarters of TOPIGS Philippines is based in Pasig City, Metro Manila.

TOPIGS is a world leader in pig genetics and the absolute market leader in several countries. TOPIGS is the biggest genetic supplier in Europe. Worldwide TOPIGS is one of the major genetic suppliers. Excellent breeding programmes and the resulting customer commitment are the key to TOPIGS’ success
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 30, 2009, 01:11:25 AM
Finance Dept Considers Duty on Feed Wheat
PHILIPPINES - The finance department does not oppose proposals to extend the zero duty on food wheat but is more cautious on doing so for wheat for animal feed.

"[We have] no objection [to the proposal extending the zero tariff on food wheat]. What is important is to make sure that there will be no misdeclaration of imports," Rosalia V. de Leon, chief of staff of Finance Secretary, Margarito B. Teves, told Business World Online in a phone interview last week.

"We have to make sure that we avoid smuggling and misdeclaration of feed wheat as food wheat. The [Bureau of] Customs is already doing something to monitor that," she added.

Ms de Leon, who is also officer in charge of the Finance department's international finance group, explained that feed wheat imports are now slapped a seven per cent duty.

She added that foregone revenues from the removal of duties on wheat are "small" but declined to cite figures.

Last November, Malacañang issued Executive Order 765, which suspended the imposition of tariffs on milling and feed wheat imports for six months from January to help importers cope with soaring commodity prices in the world market.

When asked if the department will also support the extension of the zero tariff on feed wheat, Ms de Leon said this will have to be studied further. "We have to see its revenue implications. We also have to look at compensating measures in case this [extension] is implemented," she said.

Prior to the issuance of the Palace order, the tariff rate on food wheat from members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations stood at three per cent, and five per cent for those imported elsewhere prior to the Palace order.

The order expired on 21 June but Malacañang said it is considering extending a zero tariff on feed wheat by another six months.

The Cabinet Tariff Reform Matters Committee, however, has recommended the scrapping of duty-free feed wheat importation amid protests from hog and poultry farmers and feed millers who said this could raise meat prices.

The Agricultural Alliance, a group composed of hog and poultry farmers and feed millers, has claimed that feeds account for as much as 70 per cent of costs in raising hogs and poultry.

Corn farmers, however, oppose the extension of this privilege for feed wheat, which is an alternative to corn, concludes the Business World Online report.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 04, 2009, 02:46:49 PM
3 July 2009] Brazilian pork producers have complained that the Philippines is blocking pork imports and the Brazilian Association of Pork Exporters has threatened to file a complaint with the World Trade Organization. Bloomberg reported that Association President Pedro de Camargo Neto will ask the Brazilian government to file the protest if the Philippines does not provide access within 60 days. He said they have been seeking market access to the Philippines since 2002 and  Brazil's pork plants had been cleared by Philippine veterinary inspection teams. However, Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap has not signed a document that would clear the way for Brazilian pork imports into the Philippines.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 07, 2009, 12:30:50 PM
District Office Rejects Site For Pig Abattoir
PHILIPPINES - The Pendang District Office has rejected the proposed building of a pig abattoir in Kampung Cina as the site is found to be unsuitable and also because of objections from the residents.



District officer Abdul Shukor Abdul Ghani said the decision was reached following a study by the relevant departments whose officers visited the village recently.

"From the study, the Department of Environment (DOE), Drainage and Irrigation Department (DID) and Muda Agriculture Development Authority (MADA) unanimously agreed that the location of the proposed pig abattoir is unsuitable as it will be near houses and will pollute the area," he said here Sunday.

Abdul Shukor said the building of the proposed abattoir only about 100 metres away from the residents' homes also failed to meet the condition for a buffer zone which should be 500 metres as stipulated by the DOE.

Besides that, he added, the land owner who had agreed to lease out the land for the abattoir today withdrew from the deal after taking into consideration the residents' interests.

Abdul Shukor was speaking to reporters after receiving a protest memorandum over the abattoir project from the Pendang district 4B Youth movement chairman, Ramli Abu Bakar.

According to Bernama, some time ago, more than 100 residents of Kampung China marched from the Pendang Umno building to the District Office to protest the location of the proposed pig abattoir in their village.

A resident, Edin Chok Edin Proot, 52, said the residents protested against the move as the abattoir would also be near the Buddhist temple where most of the Siamese residents prayed.

He said if the pig abattoir was built in the village, the lives of more than 800 residents would be affected as they would be facing a serious pollution problem.

"We object to the abattoir project in our area and hope the state government will reconsider the decision and find another site," he said.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 14, 2009, 08:47:27 AM
Backyard hog raising, poultry businesses surge amid crisis

CEBU CITY — While other industries, especially manufacturing, continue to feel the brunt of the global financial crunch, hog raising and other agricultural livelihood endeavors continue to prosper, a local agribusiness entrepreneur said.

“We are an agricultural country and majority of our GNP (gross national product) comes from this sector so we need to focus and rediscover its strength,” said JM Poultry and Livestock Supply President Avelino de Manuel, whose company stands as the marketing arm of Universal Feedmill Corp.

De Manuel said agribusiness, particularly hog and poultry raising, remains among the most resilient businesses despite the recent economic slowdown since agriculture is in line with the national government’s food security program.

“Hog raising continues to be bullish even during the crisis,” he said, noting a growing number of hog raisers in several areas of Cebu and neighboring provinces.

In almost every rural household in the Philippines, hog raising is a very popular enterprise such that there is a proliferation of backyard producers which dominates the swine industry, De Manuel added.

Citing industry figures, he said the country’s backyard hog raising business accounts for 80 percent while 20 percent are commercial hog raisers.

De Manuel urged Filipinos, especially those whose job security are now at risk, to venture into agribusiness as an income alternative.

Other than providing a secondary source of income for small families, he pointed out that hog raising is a fast-growing home-based business which has the potential for high profits in a relatively short period of time.

“With a capital investment of P12,000 you can invest in one sow,” he said, adding that investment returns can be expected after eight months.P50,000, one can already engage in the operation of an agri-vet shop, said De Manuel.

For a capital outlay of

As a sign of confidence in the country’s agribusiness industry, De Manuel said his 25-year-old company is set to expand in Samar and Leyte by yearend. At present, JM Poultry and Livestock supply has 43 branches in Visayas and Mindanao, 12 of them in Cebu.

But even as the prospects for agribusiness is upbeat, De Manuel said the lack of support from the government has hampered its growth. The country, he said, lags behind Vietnam, Thailand and other Southeast Asian counterparts in maximizing industry potentials.

Another factor he cited was the lack of proper education in hog raising and other agricultural livelihood.

De Manuel said 85 percent of the province’s hog raisers have not adapted to new technologies. He said the adaptation of these technologies will ensure that the hogs are in best condition once it is ready for selling.

Written by Malou M. Mozo

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 17, 2009, 10:47:15 AM
16 July 2009] Swine producers in Mindanao, Philippines that were certified to raise hogs for the country's first pork meat exports have threatened to back out due to a perceived slow action on the Ebola Reston infection detected in Luzon last year. Emilio V. Escobillo, Jr, President of the South Cotabato Swine Producers Association, said producers have lost interest to take part in the pilot pork shipment to Singapore because of the delay in the Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) to declare Mindanao as Ebola Reston virus-free.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 23, 2009, 07:01:59 AM
San Miguel Food Group Posts Higher Profits
PHILIPPINES - San Miguel Purefoods Co. Inc. (SMPFC) has posted a 26-per-cent increase in first half profits this year and expects sales to reach 80 billion pesos (PHP) for the year.



Philippine Daily Inquirer reports that SMPFC, the food unit of conglomerate San Miguel Corp. (SMC), posted a 26-per-cent increase in first half profit to PHP 541 million over a year ago on the back of higher prices of feeds and poultry and cost reduction programmes.

SMPFC officials reported during the recent stockholders' meeting that sales went up by 12 per cent in the first six months versus a year ago to PHP 36.4 billion, as higher selling prices partially covered the increase in raw material costs.

SMPFC vice chair and SMC president, Ramon Ang, said: "We are already implementing actions that should generate stronger profits for our food business, particularly in the second half.

"We're going to continue to manage higher input costs through pricing actions and operating excellence and we have made progress in several important areas of our company, particularly product innovation, more effective marketing and distribution and manufacturing efficiencies."

SMPFC expects to end the year with PHP 80 billion in revenue, up 12 per cent from last year.

Aside from the higher selling price of the feeds and poultry businesses and cost reduction programmes, profits were also boosted by the turnaround in the operations of dairy unit Magnolia in the first six months, according to Philippine Daily Inquirer.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 31, 2009, 10:27:34 AM
31 July 2009] Pork prices in the Philippines is likely to go up as backyard pig production continues to fall due to diseases and rising production costs. Data from the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc (NFHFI) show that farm prices of live hogs is currently around PHP 82-84 (USD 1.70-1.74)/kg for backyard farmers, while the price is about PHP 89-91 (USD 1.85-1.89)/kg for commercial raisers. In the retail market, pork prices hover between PHP 160-170 (USD 3.32-3.53)/kg. Pork producers blame the wide gap between farm and retail prices on the inability of the government to implement some form or price control on retail prices.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 31, 2009, 10:29:12 AM
31 July 2009] Philippine meat processors will no longer need to secure a license from the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD), but need only to get accreditation from the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) once administrative order to eliminate the functional overlap is signed. Agriculture Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup said that processors and traders will benefit from the new system, which will give the NMIS sole jurisdiction over meat establishments, including licensing, registration and certification of meat products. However, the BFAD will  continue to oversee the regulation of products that contain a 'relatively small portion' of meat or historically have not been considered as meat products. The Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc welcomed the move, saying it would be better for them to deal with only one agency.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on August 01, 2009, 09:07:57 AM
Hi Mikey,

Good Day!

Thank you for your updates.  It's really a lot of help for all of us, members of pinoyagribusiness.

 :D
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 02, 2009, 07:56:24 AM
You are welcome.We are all in this together.Information is key to any business venture.

Best of luck to all:
mikey
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 03, 2009, 09:48:56 AM
[3 August 2009] Pig producers in Mindanao have hit the government's slow action on the Ebola Reston virus (ERV) that was detected in pigs from Luzon last year which has tainted the entire industry nationwide and has led to the delay in pork shipments to Singapore. Emilio Escobillo Jr, President of the South Cotabato Swine Producers Association said the Department of Agriculture is taking too long to declare Mindanao ERV-free, although there has been no outbreak of the disease in the region. About five pig producers in Central and Southern Mindanao have been accredited to provide hogs for pork meat but at least one has already threatened to back out. The first shipment of pork from the Philippines to Singapore was supposed to have been in December last year, but this was halted after the DA admitted that ERV was detected in some samples from hog farms in Luzon.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 03, 2009, 12:15:41 PM
San Miguel to sell stake in Purefoods to fund diversification
[3 August 2009] Philippine food and beverage conglomerate San Miguel Corporation (SMC)  has confirmed plans to sell up to a 49% stake in San Miguel Pure Foods Co Inc (SMPFC) to help fund its various ventures. It is already in talks with overseas investors. In a disclosure to the Philippine Stock Exchange, SMC said the move is consistent with the company’s strategy to keep 51% of its core businesses, as previously approved by its stockholders.” SMC President Ramon Ang said they hope to complete the sale within six months. SMPFC manufactures and sells processed meat products and has also diversified into poultry and livestock operations, feeds and flour milling, dairy and coffee operations, franchising and young animal ration manufacturing and distribution.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 14, 2009, 08:31:56 AM
Hypor-Hypig Renew Commitment to Philippine Industry
PHILIPPINES - Hypor B.V. announced today that it has extended its partnership agreement with Hypig Genetics Inc/ Bounty Fresh Group based in The Philippines. The partnership began in 2005, with Hypor genetics filling Hypig breeding farms throughout 2006. The partnership has served as a model for building and sustaining pork production in The Philippines.

(L-R) Evaristo Macalino DVM - General Manager Hypor Manila; Engr. Tennyson Chen – Managing Director of HyPig / President of BFFI: Raf Beeren - Deputy Managing Director Hypor; Arch. Edwin Chen – President of HyPig / Managing Director of BFFI; Mr. Arceo Alfonso - AVP Operations of HyPig; Mr. Ray Proost – General Manager of HyPig; Mr. Edrick Chen – Management Trainee of HyPigRaf Beeren, Deputy Managing Director Hypor says, "This is a clear sign that both Hypig/Bounty and Hypor have full confidence in the Philippine market. Hypig’s great team and extensive market knowledge combined with Hypor’s unique product lines and technical expertise has proven to be very successful in this market."

Architect Edwin Chen, President of Hypig Genetics Inc. says that the initial performance results and the feedback they are getting from Hypor products in the field are very positive. 'The ongoing Hypor/Hypig alliance will greatly benefit the Philippine Swine Industry by showing how efficient pork production can be obtained with good genetics, effective management, proper nutrition and sound health of the animals. The Hypor/Hypig success is a benchmark for the Philippine Swine Industry.'

The Hypor model for business to business cooperation continues to lead to long-term sustainable development of pork production expansion in the Asian Market.


 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 15, 2009, 07:33:44 AM
Animal Production on the Rise in the Philippines
PHILIPPINES - At 1.5 per cent, agricultural output rose marginally in the first half of 2009 but livestock production was significantly higher than the same period a year ago.



AFP reports that Philippine farm output grew slightly in the six months to June as state efforts to boost crop production kicked in and the disease-ravaged livestock sector recovered, according to a government statement. However the 1.53 per cent year-on-year expansion remained way below its 4.7 per cent pace in the first half of 2008.

Farm output accounts for less than 20 per cent of the Philippines economy but 35 per cent of its labour force still depends on agriculture and Manila is the world's largest rice importer.

Fisheries output was up 4.9 per cent, poultry grew 4.13 per cent and livestock rose 2.42 per cent as the central and southern regions built up their stock for meat and poultry, according to AFP.

The department said that the livestock sector had suffered a 3.3 per cent drop in the first half of 2008 – the period used for comparison – due to a decline in hog output caused by various diseases that affected the industry from December 2007.

Livestock and poultry together account for about one quarter of the country's farm output.

Output of unhusked rice – the country's main crop – rose 3.59 per cent to 7.38 million tonnes partly as a result of state intervention programmes that expanded lands planted to grow the crop, better irrigation, extensive use of hybrid seeds, and increased fertiliser use, the department said in a statement. Manila is targeting production of 17.81 million tonnes of unhusked rice this year.

However corn, the country's second most important crop, suffered a 2.27 per cent output drop to 3.22 million tonnes.

Corn is the main feed crop for the livestock sector, and the department said farmers are being encouraged to plant more by boosting the state budget to provide "drying and marketing services to thousands of corn farmers."

Other key crops such as bananas, coconuts, peanuts and cassava also posted increases in output, the statement said.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 17, 2009, 10:53:00 AM
 Crispy pork skin maker eyes exports to US
[17 August 2009] One of the Philippines most popular makers of 'chicharon' (crispy pork skin) is planning to export its product to the US after investing in production and packaging equipment, a report by Businessworld said. R. Lapid's Chicharon and Barbecue owner Rey Lapid said he is working to get both a HACCP and ISO accreditation to become the exclusive exporter of chicharon to the US. The company which has already received a GMP accreditation from the National Meat Inspection Service, will increase its chicharon production later this year with the acquisition of a new boiler and kettle machine. Mr Lapid said he expects production to increase by 30-40% to five tonnes per day with the new equipment. Currently, R. Lapid's has 100 outlets in the country, 95 in Luzon and 5 in the Visayas. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 30, 2009, 09:22:53 AM
27 August 2009] CPF will invest THB 1.525 billion (USD 44.84 million) in swine and aqua businesses in the Philippines under its operating arm CPF Philippines Corporation, with THB 1.40 billion (USD 41.06 million) allocated for aqua operation and THB 125 million (USD 3.66 million) for swine, according to President and CEO Adirek Sripratak. The aqua business will involve a shrimp feed plant in Cebu with a capacity of 30,000 tonnes/year and fish feed mill with a capacity of 60,000 tonnes in Luzon. Swine investments include GGP and GP farms at 1,200 sows and PS farms of 14,000 pigs in Luzon island. Philippines has great potential because of its 92 million population and high pork consumption at 15 kg per capita, Mr Adirek commented.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 30, 2009, 09:24:03 AM
27 August 2009] Retail prices of pork in the Philippines have gone up by PHP 10 (USD 0.21) to PHP 160 (USD 3.30)/kg this week from PHP 150 (USD 3.09)/kg last week, with retailers blaming the price increase on a shortage in supply. However National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc President Albert RT Lim said that farm prices remain around PHP 90 (USD 1.85)/kg, and there is enough supply so there is no reason why retail prices should be going up. Meanwhile Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said his department is looking into the situation to make sure that there is no overpricing happening. The big discrepancy between farm and retail prices is usually blamed on traders who producers say are the ones jacking up the prices. Meanwhile, retail prices of chicken are down from PHP 150 (USD 3.09)/kg to PHP 125 (USD 2.58)/kg.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 12, 2009, 10:56:39 AM
In preparation for its application with the Office International des Epizooties for an 'FMD-free without vaccination' application for Luzon, the Philippine Department of Agriculture has ordered the stop of all FMD vaccination iand an inventory of all available FMD vaccines in the country. Under Administrative Order No. 12, all importation of FMD vaccines is prohibited, with importation only to be allowed through government intervention. All vaccines are also ordered to be turned over to the government for safekeeping and documentation. Reildrin Morales, Deputy Chief of the National FMD Task Force said that the withdrawal is proof that the Philippines is no longer using FMD vaccines. There are currently about 5,000-10,000 bottles of FMD vaccines in the country, enough for 250,000-500,000 hogs.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: nemo on September 12, 2009, 05:10:30 PM
Thanks mikey for the updates,,, appreciated alot.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 13, 2009, 06:57:45 AM
Doc. public service annoucement
no problem
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 14, 2009, 08:31:54 AM
 Pilmico Foods sets USD 9.6 million for expansion
[14 September 2009] Pilmico Foods Corporation is setting aside PHP 469 million (USD 9.57 million) to expand its feed and hog operations in the Philippines. A report from the Philippine Daily Inquirer said that the company's feed plant in Iligan City in Mindanao is nearing its full capacity of 10000 tonnes/month, and is now planning to order new equipment to begin expansion, which the company said could be finished by the second quarter of 2010. Pilmico is also planning on expanding its hog production with the construction of a new farm. With the upcoming Philippine national elections in 2010, demand for pork and chicken meat is forecast to increase. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 14, 2009, 08:45:02 AM
The Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) is seeking ways to collect some PHP 2.5 billion (USD 51.9 million) in unpaid loans from its Agriculture Competitiveness Enhancement Fund (ACEF). DA Undersecretary Bernie Fondevilla said that while not all borrowers have defaulted on their loans, some are having difficulty in paying back what they owe, citing as examples some hog farmers whose operations were hit by the Ebola Reston Virus. He said most borrowers have requested for loan restructuring and said that the DA was wiling to make concessions for owners of disaster-hit farms to pay back their loan but that loan condonation is a not an option. He said the agency will file cases against uncooperative borrowers.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: amt_10 on September 16, 2009, 12:37:04 AM
hello...tanong ko lng po kung alam nyo po b ung hog population ng bulacan? ang kung ilang tons ng baboy ang sinusupply nila?? :)
thanks..
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 01, 2009, 10:28:32 AM
RP to Import 20,000 Tons of Pork to Avert Shortage
PHILIPPINES - An expected tight supply of pork in the coming holiday season amid low production has prompted the government, private traders and even hog raisers to agree to import an additional 20,000 metric tons (MT) this year.



This, after consultations with hog farmers who admitted a supply gap as backyard farms have yet to recover from diseases that struck in the last two years.

"We are worried about the pork supply situation. We do not want a very sharp spike in prices," Agriculture Undersecretary Bernie G. Fondevilla said in a phone interview late last week. "Our [import] target is 20,000 MTto make sure that there is pork coming in."

Renato R. Eleria, chairman of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., concurred. "Supply is really tight. Backyard farmers are still affected by diseases in the past, so they have lower output," he said in an interview late last week. "We agreed to have a small importation for standby stock."

According to ABS-CBN News, backyard hog farms, which account for 70 per cent of total hog production, have yet to recover from diseases like the porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome and hog cholera.

Mr Fondevilla said the supply gap might push prices higher than P180 per kilogram in the holiday season. "We do not want that happening, of course."

Retail prices of pork averaged P150-P170 per kilogram last December, while prices early this week ranged from P160-P170/kg, data from the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics show.

Not all 20,000 MT will be imported in one batch "because we also want our local producers to be able to supply if they can," Mr Fondevilla said.

He explained that 5,000 MT will be delivered in November to the government while another 5,000 MT will be divided equally between private traders and hog producers. Another 10,000 MT might come in early in December.

Mr Eleria said that three years ago, the government allowed special importation of about 5,000 MT of pork to plug the supply gap in the holiday season.

To encourage private sector participation in the importation, Mr. Fondevilla said "we are asking the Finance department for a tax expenditure subsidy."

State tax expenditure subsidies are used to settle — on paper — customs duties and other taxes due the importation of goods.

The 20,000-MT imports will be on top of the 54,210 MT of fresh, chilled and frozen pork under the minimum access volume (MAV), Mr. Fondevilla said. Imports under the MAV scheme are slapped with 30 per cent duties, lower than the 40 per cent for import volumes outside the MAV.

The pork might be bought by state-run Food Terminal, Inc. from Canada, United States, Australia or the Netherlands, he added.

Mr Fondevilla said imported pork will likely cost P130/kg, including freight.

"Since part of the volume will be brought in by the government itself, our commitment to the private sector is that pork will not be released below P155/kg," Mr Fondevilla said. "That is also a way to protect our local industry and not to depress prices too much."

Hog output, which accounts for a tenth of total farm production, contracted by 1.6 per cent last year to 1.886 million MT, BAS data show.

Carlos B. Mendoza, executive director of the Livestock Development Council, said, "We might not attain the 4 per cent growth target. We changed the target to 2 per cebt growth because of low hog population."

But Mr Eleria said output could even drop 1 per cent - 1.5 per cent this year given low hog population.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 16, 2009, 08:27:16 AM
15 October 2009] The Philippine government has allowed the importation of as much as 20,000 tonnes of pork and up to 5,000 tonnes of chicken to stave off any possible shortage during the coming holiday season and up to early next year. Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said the government and private sector had already projected a shortage in pork about two months ago. Industry leader Albert RT Lim noted that even before the storms hit the Philippines, the shortage in Luzon alone was seen at around 30,000 tonnes. Meanwhile, United Broiler Raisers Association Chairman Gregorio San Diego said that while the losses of the poultry industry was not extensive, the government told them that “chicken imports are needed to take up the expected slack in demand for pork,” and that “election-related spending will increase demand for poultry products.”
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 24, 2009, 09:44:09 PM
ACMC Nucleus Expansion in the Philippines
PHILIPPINES - To meet unprecedented demand for the prolific AC1 hybrid gilt in the Philippines, Wellisa Farms has invested 15 million Philippine pesos (over £200,000) to expand its nucleus herd from 300 to 700 sows to increase production. It expects sales to double in 2009.



Satisfied ACMC customer Leon Tan Jr. (left) with Dr Danny Silbor (centre) and Dr Rene Bijasa of the Ceva Veterinary Drug Company, on Mindanao island. The gilts have to travel from island to island to reach this remote destination.


Wellisa Farms' new multiplication unit located on the highly-biosecure Bantayan island in the Philippine Cebu province. The company set up the unit on the tropical island of Bantayan in Cebu province in 2006 using stock, under licence, from British pig-breeding company ACMC.

The original aim was to supply their own breeders within an integrated operation tied-in with Cebu city’s abattoirs. Surplus gilts were sold to other pig farmers in the area and such was the prolificacy of the stock that this soon developed into a healthy market with demand coming from both existing and new customers, mainly on small-to-medium sized farms.

Geographically, sales go to Cebu and the Visayan Archipelago, with some stock being shipped to the main island of Luzon.

The AC1 gilt is produced by crossing ACMC’s Meidam female with the Volante damline boar. Having expanded from existing nucleus stock Wellisa Farms will be importing more animals and semen from Britain to keep their genetics up-to-date.

“Due to the Meidam genes, the AC1 can produce over two pigs more per litter than normal commercial sows in the Philippines,” commented Stephen Curtis ACMC’s chairman.

The stock is well adapted to the tropical weather and conditions in the Philippines and, having proved itself, has now become widely accepted,” said Danny Silbor, managing director, of ACMC’s Filipino franchise.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 24, 2009, 09:47:43 PM
21 October 2009] The Philippine government is seeking an FMD-free status for several key producing provinces in Luzon from the the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE). Bureau of Animal Industry Director Dr Davinio Catbagan said that the government will again file for FMD-free certification from OIE in November. He said the application for FMD-free with vaccination certification will cover Central Luzon, Calabarzon and Pangasinan, all of which are key pig producing regions in Luzon. Meanwhile, FMD-free without vaccination status is being requested for the Ilocos region, Cagayan Valley, Mimaropa and the Bicol Region. No outbreaks have been reported throughout Luzon since December 2005, however the government's application for FMD-free status was denied earlier in April this year due to a missing blood test.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 01, 2009, 09:02:19 AM
 Monterey to merge with livestock firm
[30 October 2009] Monterey Foods Corp, the Philippines largest hog raiser, has acquired Highbreed Livestock Corp, a company engaged in livesock farming, and has secured an approval from the Securities and Exchange Commission to merge the two companies to improve operations efficiency, a report by Businessworld said. Monterey, a subsidiary of San Miguel Corp,  would add Highbreed Livestock’s assets and liabilities worth PHP 921.78 million (USD 19.36 million) and PHP 959.08 million (USD 20.14) respectively to its own which stood at PHP 4.95 billion (USD 103.97 million) and PHP 4.69 billion (USD 98.51 million). From January-June 2009, Monterey registered a 9% sales growth despite the weakened consumer demand. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 02, 2009, 09:09:34 AM
Philippines Farmers to Benefit from Free Trade Deal
PHILIPPINES - Poultry and pig farmers are set to benefit from lower feed costs due to the ASEAN free trade agreement.



Poultry growers and pig farmers see lower feed costs as one possible silver lining in the impending implementation of a free-trade scheme among members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

Elias Inciong, vice president of the United Broiler Raisers Association (UBRA), told Business Mirror of the Philippines that alternative raw materials for feed, such as tapioca, could become cheaper due to the elimination of tariffs under the ASEAN Free Trade Area Common Effective Preferential Treatment (AFTA-CEPT).

"With tariffs at zero level, alternative-feed materials such as tapioca would be more affordable," said Mr Inciong, in a chance interview at the sidelines of a trade and investment mission of the United States Department of Agriculture in the Philippines.

Albert Lim Jr., National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI) president, agreed that raw materials for animal feeds will become less prohibitive once the AFTA-CEPT goes into full implementation next year. Mr Lim noted that tapioca pellets used as feed input are slapped a tariff of 35 per cent.

Other feed inputs such as soybeans are slapped a tariff of one per cent, three per cent for soybean meal and three per cent for dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS).

"Feed materials could become cheaper due to AFTA, but the source of the materials could pose a problem," he said.

The NFHFI chief said only Thailand produces surplus tapioca pellets, which the Philippines can buy.

As for yellow corn, Mr Lim noted that Indonesia does not produce enough for export to other Southeast Asian countries at zero tariffs.

Business Mirror reports that stakeholders in the livestock and poultry sector admitted that they are keen on Malaysia and Indonesia as possible sources of yellow corn. Under AFTA, the 35-per-cent tariff on yellow corn imposed by Manila will be removed.

Traditionally, the Philippines sources its yellow corn requirement from the United States, Argentina and Brazil whenever there is a shortage. Yellow corn makes up 50 to 60 per cent of animal feeds. Any increase in the cost of yellow corn in the domestic market will have a corresponding impact on the retail price of pork and dressed chicken.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 05, 2009, 12:40:37 PM
5 November 2009] Pork importers and traders in the Philippines said they are unlikely to bring in the 2500 tonnes of pork  before the deadline set by the government. Meat Importers and Traders Association President Jesus Cham said that the government has only given importers up to December 2 to bring in the meat, however the arrival date is too soon because “it would take at least 60 days to ship the pork products.” The government earlier decided to allow as much as 20000 tonnes of pork imports after the country was hit by two successive typhoons in September and October. Mr Cham said that the importers tried negotiating with suppliers from the US, Canada and Europe, but none could commit to ship the products before the government deadline. Meanwhile, Agriculture Undersecretary Bernie Fondevilla said that the government is currently studying the possibility of extending the deadline.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 06, 2009, 09:41:50 AM
6 November 2009] The Philippine government's plan to import pork and and chicken meat for the Christmas season could bring down farm prices. Demand for chicken and pork meat products like hams traditionally picks up during the latter part of the year as Filipinos celebrate the holidays, but industry players say that demand from meat processing companies have slowed down. Some industry observers say that farm prices have not been moving much and people are still not buying. If that is the case, when the imports come, prices of the local meat products will likely go down to compete with the cheaper imports.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 10, 2009, 11:46:53 AM
Monday, November 09, 2009Print This Page
NMIS Accredits 19 Meat Plants in Cordillera Region
PHILIPPINES - The Philippine National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) is stepping up efforts in safeguarding meat, livestock and poultry industry in the region in its bid to protect the safety of the consuming public and promote the industry.



NMIS-CAR Regional Technical Director Dr Florencio Pintor said their office has accredited 19 meat establishments such as slaughterhouses, meat processing plants, meat cutting plants, and poultry dressing plant in the region.

Five were certified as having Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) based on the NMIS standards. The accreditation stands for a yearand if not maintained, the classification will be downgraded according to Dr Pintor.

GMP certified meat establishments, which fall under class "AA" are the Poultry Dressing Plant of Pamora in Pidigan, Abra; Meat Processing Plants of Josier Frozen Foods in Upper QM and Grow Foods Meat Products in Leonila Hill; Gismundo Slaughterhouse in Tuba, Benguet and Alabanza Private Abattoir in Tuba, Benguet.

NMIS-CAR Senior Meat Control Officer Dr Yvette Soller, who is among the few certified Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) auditors nationwide, said GMP compliance can be used as a starting point for controlling food safety risks from biological, physical and chemical hazards.

Dr Soller said HACCP certification which is mandatory for class "AAA" accredited establishments requires a more specific means of hazard identification. Class "AAA" refers to those with facilities and operational procedures appropriated to slaughter livestock and fowls for sale in any market, domestic or international.

Class "AA" refers to those with facilities and operational procedures sufficiently adequate that the livestock and poultry slaughtered is suitable for sale in any market within the country.

Class "A" refers to those with facilities and procedures of minimum adequacy that the livestock and fowls slaughtered are suitable for distribution and sale only within the city or municipality where the slaughterhouse is located.

Dr Pintor said that a product may have obtained a GMP or HACCP accreditation however, this again depends upon the level of retailers selling the products. If not placed in appropriate display facilities or storage areas then such kinds of accreditation is useless as the quality suffers, he stressed.

Dr Pintor also bared the establishments for upgrading of classification as follows: Lagawe Municipal Abattoir and Lamut Municipal Slaughterhouse (SLH) in Ifugao and Tabuk City Abattoir in Kalinga from class "A" to "AA" while the Bontoc Municipal Abattoir in Mt. Province accredited as class "AA" has application for upgrading.

Other NMIS accredited meat establishments in the region all under Class "A" are the Bangued Municipal SLH, Manabo Municipal SLH, and Tayum Municipal SLH in Abra; Pudtol Municipal SLH in Apayao; the Baguio City SLH, Lea's Frozen Foods, Leony's Frozen Foods, and Pig Planet Meat Products, all in Baguio; and the Philex Mines Abattoir in Benguet. The Kiangan Municipal SLH in Ifugao is still on the process of being accredited.

Meanwhile, in line with the National Meat Safety Week held last month, last week the NMIS recognised the regional winners in the 2009 Search for the Best Meat establishments in the Cordillera. These are the Pig Planet Meat Products located in Balacbac Road under class A for Meat Cutting Plant (Special Award); Lea's Frozen Foods in Aurora Hill and Grow Foods Meat Products in Leonila Hill, all in Baguio City, are the regional winners under class A and AA respectively for Meat Processing Plant; and Pamora Farm Incorporated in Pidigan, Abra under class AA (Special Award) for Poultry Dressing Plant.

For the Slaughterhouse, Lagawe Municipal Abattoir in Ifugao was adjudged as regional winner under class A, Gismundo Slaughterhouse in Tuba, Benguet as a regional winner under class AA while Alabanza Private Abattoir in Tuba, Benguet garnered a special award under class AA.

Lagawe Mayor Caesario Cabbigat shared the local government unit's experience in making operational the town- operated slaughterhouse which was established 12 years ago. His administration opted to develop with the guidance of the NMIS allotting P1.2 million for its completion. His political will drove him to adopt measures for meat vendors to use the slaughterhouse.

Mr Cabbigat admitted that initially businessmen who are into meat vending evaded the use of the slaughterhouse. A task force on bantay karne was created involving multi-sectoral groups and it worked. Businessmen soon realised the importance of the utilization of slaughterhouse and the assurance of quality of meat sold in the market, he said.

Alabanza Private Abattoir Proprietor Nancy Alabanza expressed her appreciation to the NMIS on the trainings and exposures they were accorded which paid off in improving their lot. She encouraged other owners of meat establishments to grab such opportunity which serves as a venue in exchanging ideas and a learning experience.

NMIS also recognised agency members of the Regional Committee on Meat Establishment Amenities and Technology (RECOMEAT) during the awarding ceremonies such the Department of Health and the Department of Interior and Local Government.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 15, 2009, 06:25:59 AM
Friday, November 13, 2009Print This Page
Hog Raisers Seek Lifting of Price Ceiling
PHILIPPINES - The country's local hog raisers are recommending the lifting of the price ceiling on pork by December, as farmgate prices are expected to rise in response to increased demand.



Albert Lim, president of the National Hog Raisers Association, said a price ceiling during a time of extremely high demand could cause a shortage in pork supply in Luzon.

He explained that the sow population in Luzon had decreased, causing a production shortfall. Supply from the Visayas and Mindanao, however, remained relatively high.

According to Inquirer, he said that to supply the shortfall in Luzon, pork from General Santos City could be brought to the region.

With a ceiling of P170 a kilo in effect, however, hog raisers might no longer be keen on sending supply over to Luzon.

"The current retail price is okay for now, considering the existing farmgate prices. But at this time, there’s not much demand yet. The Christmas demand is not yet here. By December, retail prices (without the ceiling) could reach P200-P220 a kilo," he said. "But we also don’t want prices to go too high. Around P200 a kilo should be reasonable."

He also noted that prices in General Santos had already increased due to demand, providing a disincentive for producers there to sell in Luzon if the price freeze would remain in effect.


 

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 26, 2009, 12:35:35 PM
Wednesday, November 25, 2009Print This Page
Canada Offers to Sell Pork to Philippines
PHILIPPINES - Canada, whose annual pork production is 30 million hogs and which exports one million tons of pork products a year, is ready to help supply the Philippine market which is facing a shortage.



In an exclusive interview, Canadian Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway Stockwell Day told that The STAR that Canada is “ready to help meet the demand in the Philippines.”

Canada’s biggest export is agri-food and the Philippines, according to Day, is Canada’s 9th biggest destination for its agri-products.

Canadian exports to the Philippines last year amounted to C$559.5 million (at an exchange rate of C$1 = P45) or P25.177 billion.

The Philippines’ biggest export to Canada, on the other hand, is electrical machinery.

Canadian imports from the Philippines last year amounted to C$822.7 million or P37.021 billion.

Canadian foreign direct investments in the Philippines in 2008, likewise, is a healthy C$671 million or P30.195 billion.

One big Canadian investor in the mining sector is TVI Resources which operates in Mindanao.

Mr Day assured that as part of Canada’s investment thrust, it is implementing a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) for all Canadian firms.

However, Mr Day evaded a direct answer to questions about the entry of more Philippines fruits and food products to Canada.

According to Mr Day, Canada looks at the phyto-sanitary practices of its neighbors to learn and align their own standards.

Philippine fruit products to Canada faces nearly the same hurdles it must go through to access the US market which is Canada’s southern neighbor.

Canada, Mr Day also revealed, is looking at “strengthening linkages” through more bilateral regional trade arrangements similar to the North American Free Trade Arrangement (NAFTA) even as it also adheres to the global World Trade Organization (WTO) system.

“We are always looking for ways to facilitate trade,” Mr Day assured.

Aside from agri-foods, Mr Day said, Canada is also offering opportunities for ties in investment and financial services, as well as insurance as Canada has proven that it can offer more stability than its neighbor
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 01, 2009, 08:53:54 AM
Philippine Govt Prescribes Pork and Chicken Prices
PHILIPPINES - The government yesterday announced suggested retail prices (SRP) for pork, chicken and also sugar during the holiday season, to be implemented in Metro Manila initially.



The reference prices, issued as a non-binding guide for both sellers and buyers, were agreed upon by the government and the private sector in a meeting on Friday, according to ABS-CBN News.

The SRPs, effective yesterday, are as follows: P41-P43 per kilogram for white sugar, P135-P145/kg for whole dressed chicken, P160-P165/kg for pork kasim and P170-P175/kg for pork liempo.

"Initially, that will be implemented in the National Capital Region," Agriculture Undersecretary Salvador S. Salacup said in a phone interview yesterday.

He added that after a review, the government might expand SRP coverage to the rest of the country.

In a statement, Mr Salacup said the price band would serve as a guide for farmers, slaughterhouse operators, meat dealers, wholesalers, retailers and consumers.

Ahead of the holiday season, prices of pork prime cuts and sugar rose late last week to P155-P190/kg and P42-P46/kg, respectively, from P150-P190/kg and P40-P42/kg the previous week, data from the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics show.

Chicken prices, however, kept steady at P130-P150/kg.

Prevailing prices were also higher than the P160-P180/kg for pork, P120-P140/kg for chicken and P38-P40/kg for sugar late last month.

Employees of the Agriculture and Trade department "will regularly make the rounds of retail outlets every morning to ensure that sellers follow the SRPs," Mr Salacup said.

Furthermore, the departments "will conduct a weekly review to find out whether we should lower or raise the SRPs, or whether it is already time to lift them considering several factors affect the volatility of agricultural commodity prices," he added.

Asked to comment, industry leaders welcomed the scheme.

"Right now, I agree with the prices," Albert R.T. Lim, Jr., president of the National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc., said yester-day in a separate phone interview.

"But in mid-December, [suggested] prices should increase."

"It is only during [the holidays] when piggery owners earn more," he said, adding that "if prices are really high, consumers have the choice to shift to chick-en."

Elias Jose M. Inciong, external vice-president of the United Broiler Raisers’ Association, said "That pricing scheme is good…it gives the consumers the idea what will be the reasonable price."

In October last year, the government and industries concerned agreed to cut retail prices of pork cuts to P140-150/kg from as high as P180-P190/kg to spur demand.

Chicken was not subjected to SRP, ABS-CBN News reports.

Furthermore, the Agriculture department said 8,000 metric tons (MT) pork and 8,000 MT chicken imports will start to arrive this week until early next year to plug a supply gap.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 15, 2010, 02:03:38 PM
Mindanao hog producers calls for separate biosecurity region. Mindanao hog farmers are calling on the government to declare Mindanao as a separate biosecurity region in order to boost the development and growth of the industry in the island as well as boost the export potential of its pork meat and pork products. By doing this, Mindanao will avoid being tagged with Luzon and Visayas in reporting biosecurity issues. Pork producers in Mindanao has been looking forward to exporting pork meat and pork products to Singapore since the country expressed its interest in sourcing these products from the region, which the Office Internationale des Epizooties had declared and recognised as FMD-free for many years now. However, the initial shipment to Singapore that was scheduled to take place in December 2008 was halted when the Philippines voluntarily suspended exports following the that the Ebola Reston virus was detected in blood samples from pigs in Luzon.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 17, 2010, 03:45:17 PM
Tuesday, February 16, 2010Print This Page
Gov’t Bans Imports of Pork from South Korea
PHILIPPINES - The government has banned imports of pork from South Korea, as well as poultry and live birds from the same country and Taiwan, an Agriculture official said over the weekend.



Davinio P. Catbagan, director of the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), said in a phone interview that the ban on pork, poultry products and live birds from South Korea was issued on 5 January, while the one on poultry and live birds from Taiwan was issued on 26 January.

He attributed the ban to reports of outbreaks of foot and mouth disease (FMD) as well as low-pathogenic avian influenza, or bird flu, in those economies.

According to BusinessWorld, on 30 January, South Korea reported its sixth FMD case in a cattle farm north of Seoul.

The same country reported on 26 January that tests conducted in December last year confirmed that about 26,000 ducks in a farm in Seosan City were infected with the H5 strain of bird flu.

Taiwan, on the other hand, reported on 21 January that 7,000 chickens in a farm in Changhua County, Taiwan died of the virus.

Last year, the Philippines imported 114.36 million kilograms of pork, 7.6 per cent of which came from South Korea. But the Philippines does not import poultry or poultry products from either South Korea or Taiwan.

BAI data show that the local livestock sector lost about P2.3 billion to FMD between 1995-2005. The country has not had any reported case of the disease since then.

The Philippines has a pending application with the World Organization for Animal Health for "FMD-free without vaccination" status for Luzon -- the remaining part of the country without such certification.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 17, 2010, 03:50:19 PM
Philippines await FMD-free certification from OIE
[17 February 2010] The Philippines is hoping that the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE) will certify the whole island of Luzon as FMD-free when it evaluates the country's application in March. Bureau of Animal Industry Director Dr Davinio Catbagan said that experts from the OIE has helped craft the documents for evaluation, and have suggested the Luzon be divided into three zones. Dr Reildrin Morales, National Coordinator of the Bureau’s FMD program, said that FMD vaccination has been withdrawn for almost two years in two zones but less than 12 months in the third.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 17, 2010, 03:55:19 PM
Philippine hog production inched up 1.2% in 2009
[2 February 2010] Philippine hog production rose by a mere 1.2% in 2009, but this is still better than the 1.6% contraction it suffered in 2008. Figures released by the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) showed that hog production last year neared 1.88 million tonnes, better than 2008's 1.86 million tonnes but still less than 2007's 1.89 million tonnes. Valuewise, hog production grossed roughly PHP 161.15 billion (USD 3.45 billion), an improvement of 5.91% from 2008's PHP 152.15 billion (USD 3.26 billion). The sector remains the second leading contributor to the entire gross value of Philippine agriculture for the year, accounting for 13.56% of the total. The improvement has been attributed to increased production volume as well as better prices which grew by 4.7% to PHP 85.84 (USD 1.84)/kg in 2009 from PHP 81.99 (USD 1.76)/kg the previous year. BAS credited the industry's better performance in 2009 to the increase in the number of finishing stocks in the Visayas and Mindanao and the control of the Porcine Respiratory and Reproductive Syndrome (PRRS).
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 17, 2010, 03:56:42 PM
Philippine pork supply remains tight, higher prices expected
[1 February 2010] Despite the improving output of the Philippine hog industry, the country will continue to experience a tight supply of pork meat at least until April 2010. Agriculture Assistant Secretary Salvador Salacup said that at least for the first four months of the year, pork supply will remain tight as many pig farms are still recovering from the PRRS outbreak that hit the country in the last few years. However, he added that there are currently no plans to allow special importation. Meanwhile, Bureau of Animal Industry Director Dr Davinio Catbagan said that pig and poultry production might be affected by the El Niño phenomenon that the country is currently experiencing, which could bring an extended drought. Dr Catbagan said the livestock and poultry sectors combined stand to lose as much as PHP 10 billion (PHP 214.13 million) as a result of the dry spell, which would stunt the growth of the animals.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on February 23, 2010, 10:06:25 AM
ERV diagnostic lab in Philippines gets upgrade
[22 February 2010] The Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) recently inaugurated the renovated Ebola Diagnostic Laboratory at BAI's Philippine Animal Health Centre. The upgraded laboratory now has the capacity to conduct antigen and antibody detection of the Ebola Reston virus (ERV), and the BAI said the lab will provide vital support in the quick diagnosis, surveillance and monitoring of the virus in the field. It will also help establish the prevalence of the virus in pigs and help to better understand its animal-human-wildlife interface. Pork producers in the Philippines welcomed the development, saying this will help the Philippines in its plans to export its pork meat and pork products.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 12, 2010, 10:17:54 AM
Dry Spell Causes Chicken, Pork Prices to Rise
PHILIPPINES - Aside from causing daily power outages in parts of the Philippines, the ongoing dry spell is also causing the prices of chicken and pork to increase.



According to All Headline News, a party-list representative estimates retail prices of the two types of meat typically bought by Filipino households may go up by $0.10 a kilo (5 pesos) by April or May.

Representative Nicanor Briones of the Agricultural Sector Alliance of the Philippines explained the upcoming price increase to cost of corn feed used in chicken and poultry farms to a $0.07 (3.50 pesos) per kilo hike in corn feed prices.

Because of the El Nino phenomenon about $239 million (11 billion pesos) worth of agricultural crops have been lost in 14 provinces, the bulk of the losses are rice and corn crops. Representative Briones forecasts the loss of the agricultural sector will go up to $434 million (20 billion pesos) until the dry spell ends.

In Bacolod City, Agriculture Regional Director Larry Nacionales warns Negros Occidental $137 million (6.3 billion pesos) poultry industry is at risk because of El Nino. The province has a stock of four million native chickens and fighting cocks and produces 1.5 million broilers monthly - which are all at risk because of the dry spell.

So far $66,050 (3.04 million pesos) worth of losses in hog, livestock and poultry have been recorded in 21 towns and cities of Negros Occidental, Mr Nacionales said. To help the animal farmers, the provincial agricultural office distributed vaccines and drugs to the hog and poultry raisers.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on March 17, 2010, 10:19:37 AM
Sufficient supply of chicken and pork
[16 March 2010] Filipino consumers have been assured of adequate supply of chicken and pork meat. Bureau of Animal Industry Director Dr Davinio Catbagan said that currently, there is no need for any additional chicken and pork imports. While there is enough chicken, he did acknowledge that pork production is still down. Nevertheless, supply will be able to meet the demand, which currently remain weak. This is not helped by the fact that retail prices of pork and chicken remains high at around PHP 170-180 (USD 3.72-3.94)/kg and PHP 130-140 (USD 2.85-3.07)/kg respectively. Farm prices of live hogs currently hovers around PHP 115 (USD 2.52) with broilers at around PHP  58-69 (USD 1.27-1.51)/kg. Local poultry raisers have asked the government to implement suggested retail prices for chicken to temper retail prices and help push up demand for the commodity.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on April 28, 2010, 08:39:37 AM
Philippines to import pork to stabilise prices
[28 April 2010] Philippine President Gloria Arroyo has approved the importation of up to 5,000 tonnes of pork over the next two months to ensure pork supply and stabilise pork prices. The Philippine Department of Agriculture expects pork shortage to top 31 tonnes after a series of storms and diseases hit hog farms in the latter part of 2009. Under Executive Order 875, the Food Terminal Inc (FTI) has been tasked to ensure that people have continuous access to pork and other commodities, “considering its capability and experience in the marketing of pork.” Mrs Arroyo said the FTI is to use its funds and government-guaranteed credit lines to finance its pork importation. She also authorised the Agriculture Department to determine the volumes to be imported, provided it does not exceed 5,000 tonnes.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 05, 2010, 09:58:22 AM
Government defends pork importation
[4 May 2010] The Philippine government has defended its decision to import additional pork at zero duty even as hog raisers and meat processors question the need for it. Agriculture Undersecretary Salvador Salacup said that the shortage in production and high retail prices of pork prompted the importation order. Pork currently sells between PHP 180-190/kg (USD 4.04-4.27) in the wet markets. Earlier, hog raisers, meat processors and slaughterhouse operators, through the Swine Board, urged the government to scrap the additional imports saying that when they arrive around June and July, pork prices will be at their traditionally lowest level, and will “most certainly disturb and distort the market.” Meanwhile, the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc also expressed fears that any pork imports might possibly affect the government’s efforts to get its FMD-free status for Luzon, as the imports might come from FMD-infected countries.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 22, 2010, 11:23:45 AM
MFC, PIC Sign Long-term Partnership Agreement
PHILIPPINES - Monterey Foods Corporation (MFC), the Philippine’s largest pork producer and quality meat retailer, recently signed a 6-year Supply Partnership Agreement with global swine genetics leader, PIC, on Friday, 14 May at the Palms Country Club in Alabang, Muntinlupa.

 
The new contract is set to update and maintain more than 70 per cent of the growing MFC swine breeding herds across the nation with the latest in PIC’s improved genetic technology for maximum productivity and meat quality.

A subsidiary of San Miguel Pure Foods Company, Inc., MFC has been continuously improving their operations to satisfy the need of consumers for quality pork. Representing MFC were Dr Leo Obviar, General Manager for Poultry & Meats, Dr Rey Zamora, VP and Live Operations Manager, and Dr Jay Molina. On behalf of UK based genetic technology supplier, PIC, Andrew Bateson, Asia Regional Director, Vincent Borromeo, Philippines General Manager and Dr Angel Manabat, Technical Manager penned the deal.

“We are excited with this new phase of our relationship with Monterey. Over the years, we have enjoyed working with them to serve the growing need of consumers for quality, healthy pork. In line with this, we have never stopped improving our products and services to meet their strict standards on productivity, health and meat quality,” disclosed Mr Borromeo.

A relationship that began in 1994 when 2,062 PIC breeders were imported from Australia to stock Monterey’s first farms in Mindanao, this now marks 16 years of working hand in hand to improve each segment of the MFC pork chain, from farm to market. This partnership gives MFC access to the latest PIC technologies from around the globe, as it enters another decade of bringing affordable quality meats to every meal.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on May 28, 2010, 08:48:47 AM
Flat growth in Philippine hog production 
[28 May 2010] Philippine hog production barely grew in the first three months of 2010, as output increased by only 0.35%. Data from the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) showed that from January to March, total hog production was 455,480 tonnes, just slightly higher than the 453,890 tonnes posted last year. The subpar performance has been attributed to lower stocks of finisher pigs and a tight supply of piglets. Industry observers also noted that diseases continued to plague the hog sector adversely affecting production. Valuewise, the hog industry grossed PHP 42.66 billion (USD 936 million) during the period, up 9.5% from PHP 39.96 billion (USD 836.99 million) in 2009. Meanwhile, average farm prices of live hogs averaged PHP 93.67 (USD 2.01)/kg, up 9.12% from the yearago level of PHP 85.84 (USD 1.84).
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 04, 2010, 09:53:41 AM
 Meat traders unlikely to import pork
[4 June 2010] Meat traders in the Philippines are unlikely to import pork cuts this year following a sharp increase in world market prices. According to Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines Inc President Albert Lim Jr, the average price of pork from traditional meat exporting countries like the US in April was USD 0.78/lb, up from USD 0.56/lb during the same time in 2009. He said this made imports prohibitive and is likely to discourage meat traders from bringing in pork. Meanwhile, although the government has authorised the importation of 5000 tonnes of pork meat to stabilise prices, none of the meat has arrived so far, and industry stakeholders say it is looking like there will be no pork meat coming in. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 04, 2010, 10:22:44 AM
Thursday, June 03, 2010Print This Page
Hog-Raising Pushed to Boost Livelihood in Vizcaya
PHILIPPINES - At least 25 swine were distributed throughout a village in mountainous Dupax del Norte by the Philippine subsidiary of an Australian mining company.

Royalco Philippines gave out the swines in remote Yabbe village as part of their company’s socio-civic development, livelihood generation and corporate responsibility project that began in March this year. The activity began with an initial cost of P75,000, reports The Manila Times.net.

The project is aimed at providing alternative income sources for low-income families by providing them with a female piglet to raise until it is physically mature and ready for breeding.

“Any excess piglets the sow will have may be sold by the recipient, including the sow itself. Of course, it would be much better if the recipients continue to breed their swine,” said Gemma Segundo, Royalco’s Community Development Affairs officer.

The company said this would be “paying back” the community for the assistance given to them. Royalco Philippines is also hoping that the community would multiply the distributed number of swines by returning at least one female piglet to the company, which will be later donated to other members of Yabbe village for the same purpose.



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 23, 2010, 07:54:44 AM
Monday, June 21, 2010Print This Page
TOPIGS Philippines Starts InGene Partnership
PHILIPPINES - TOPIGS Philippines and Monterey Foods Corporation (MFC), the biggest pig operation in the Philippines, have formally signed an InGene partnership agreement.

The InGene agreement was signed by (L-R) Dr Jose A. Molina II (Genetics Analysts, MFC) Dr Regalado Z. Zamora (Live Operations Manager, MFC), Dr Leo A. Obviar (General Manager, Poultry and Meat Business, MFC), Mr Rene ten Brinke (Regional Director, Asia- Pacific, TOPIGS International) and Dr Bryan M. Retales (COO, TOPIGS Philippines).Now TOPIGS can start to supply pig genetics to Monterey, starting in their South Mindanao Live Operations.

The InGene programme enables MFC to produce its own sows with the highest genetic potential using the genetics, knowledge and support of TOPIGS. A key element of InGene is the linking of MFC’s breeding herd to Pigbase, the world’s largest pig-breeding database that contains genetic information from more than 800 breeding farms worldwide. Pigbase contains data on more than 20 million pigs, which makes it a powerful tool for achieving genetic progress within the breeding programme of TOPIGS as well as on farms using the Ingene programme.

TOPIGS Philippines is a subsidiary of TOPIGS International and is a key genetic supplier in the Philippines. TOPIGS is a world leader in pig genetics and the absolute market leader in several countries. TOPIGS is the biggest genetic supplier in Europe. Excellent breeding programmes and the resulting customer commitment are the key to TOPIGS’ success.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on June 24, 2010, 09:21:39 AM
 News Press Philippines welcomes UK pig producers
Pig producers now have an important new market as the Philippines has re-opened its market to the UK.
Related

The market had been closed since the outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in 2007 and never formally re-opened.


Work by BPEX and Defra helped fast-track the approval from the country's veterinary authorities.


BPEX International Manager Peter Hardwick said: "This has all happened in the last four weeks and already two or three consignments have been exported.

"The Philippines is a very important market for the fifth quarter and offals and we have hopes the trade will grow rapidly.
 
"Fifth quarter is particularly important as it has a low value here - in some cases even a disposal cost - while it can command good prices in some overseas markets."
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 08, 2010, 10:56:43 AM
 Philippine unlikely to export pork this year
[8 July 2010] The Philippines' plan to export pork is unlikely to happen this year as the country is still waiting for Mindanao to be declared free of the Ebola Reston Virus (ERV). The Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) is still waiting for test and antigen kits for ERV to arrive from the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. Singapore has renewed its interest to resume talks on pork imports from the Philippines, sending a team of health experts to the country in March to inspect facilities in Mindanao. BAI officials said testing for ERV will increase the confidence of Singapore in the safety of pork products in the region, particularly in General Santos City, which the government has prioritised for the testing. The Philippines was all set to send its first pork shipments to Singapore in December 2008 when the Philippine Departments of Agriculture and of Health issued a hold order after announcing that the ERV had been found in blood samples from pigs in Luzon. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 30, 2010, 10:26:44 AM
Philippines hog output to drop
[29 July 2010] Hog production in the Philippines is expected to dip by 3% this year due to the lingering impact of damage to commercial and backyard farms caused by storms that hit the country late last year. The government, on the other hand, expects at least a 1% growth this year, citing recovery of some backyard farms from the storm damage. Some 70% of the swine population is raised in backyard farms
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on July 30, 2010, 10:27:52 AM
 Philippines hopes to export pork by year end
[30 July 2010] The Philippine government is hoping to push through with pork exports by the end of this year, however industry members believe it may take another year or two before this can be realised. Dr Rieldrin Morales of the Bureau of Animal Industry’s Animal Health Division expects testing for the Ebola Reston Virus to happen in the third quarter of the year, which might lead to pork exports later in the year. However, Mr Albert Lim of the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines Inc said the local hog raisers still need to increase their production capacity to cover domestic demand before they can provide for the export market. 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 05, 2010, 09:47:25 AM
Shortage could jack up pork prices in December
[4 August 2010] A pork shortage is likely to push up prices in December this year if the new Philippine government administration does not address the continuing shortfall in hog production. Federation of Pork Producers of the Philippines Inc President Albert Lim said there is still a shortfall in hog output and the only reason this isn’t reflected in market prices is because demand for pork has been weak. He said had pork production been adequate, pork prices would have been lower than the current prices that hover between PHP 150-175 (USD 3.28-3.84)/kg in wet markets. However, farm price has gone down to PHP 108 (USD 2.36)/kg in Luzon and even lower in the Vis-Min region. He urged the government to distribute piglets to backyard farmers to help ensure enough supply in the latter part of the year, when pork demand shoots up because of the Christmas holidays.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 09, 2010, 11:13:19 AM
Philippines - Hog Industry Updates
Pig production increased by more than 1.1 per cent in value terms in 2009 while per-capita pork consumption declined, according to Pia A. Ang in the latest GAIN report from the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. 

Annual Summary

Report Highlights
Philippine hog production, valued at 161 billion pesos (PHP; $3.5 billion), increased by 1.16 per cent in 2009. Consumption of pork, estimated at 1.357 million metric tons last year, continued to decline on a per-capita basis. Imports of pork, on the other hand, rose by five per cent in 2009, comprised mostly of pork fats, rind and assorted pork cuts and offal, mainly from Canada (37 per cent) and the United States (32 per cent). Tariff rates of pork imports from the ASEAN region were lowered to zero to five per cent from 1 January 2010. In May 2010, Zones 1 and 3 in the Luzon area were recognised by the Office International des Epizooties as FMD-free without vaccination.

Production
In 2009, Philippine hog production was valued at over PHP161 billion [1] ($3.5 billion), increased by 1.16 per cent in liveweight basis from the previous year or 1.357 million metric tons (MMT) in carcass weight equivalent (CWE).

The local hog industry accounts for about 83 per cent of the total livestock production and is equivalent to almost 15 per cent of total value of agricultural production. As of January 2010, the total number of pigs is about 13.4 million head, of which 71 per cent are from backyard farms and 29 per cent are being raised by commercial farms. The highest number of pigs can be found in the CALABARZON Cavite-Laguna-Batangas (1.76 million), followed by Western Visayas (1.65 million) and Central Luzon (1.43 million).

From January to March 2010, hog production inched up by 0.35 percent. This slowdown was manifested in the lower stocks of fatteners and tight supply of piglets as observed in Cagayan Valley, Central Luzon and CALABARZON, according to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS).

[1] Current Prices; US$1=PHP46.36 as of 8 July 2010


Consumption
Total demand for pork in 2009 reached almost 1.357 million metric tons (CWE), of which 97 per cent was produced locally and the remaining three per cent was imported. Pork supply is mostly for domestic food consumption which is about 98 per cent, and the balance is manufactured into canned or processed meat. The derived consumption of pork (excluding offal and processed meats) in 2009 was 14.87kg, lower that the previous two years.

According to BAS, higher prices offered by traders pushed farm-gate hog prices up by 4.70 per cent in 2009.


Trade
Pork imports increased by five per cent in 2009, comprised mostly of pork fats and rind for processing, as well as various pork cuts (i.e., hams and shoulders) and offal. Main country sources for pork were Canada, 37 per cent and the United States, 32 per cent. Imports from the United States nearly tripled from 10,351MT in 2007 to 36,809MT last year.

Policy
Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD): In May 2010, the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) secured a certification from Paris-based Office International des Epizooties (OIE) recognizing two of the three zones (Zones 1 and 3) in Luzon as FMD-free without vaccination. The DA announced that the provinces in North and South Luzon have been recognized by the OIE as ‘free from foot and mouth disease where vaccination is not practiced.’ The application for an FMD-free declaration without vaccination for Luzon’s Zone 2 is now pending with the OIE.

Mindanao and Visayas along with the island provinces of Palawan and Masbate were already declared by the OIE as FMD-free without vaccination in 2001 and 2002 respectively. To facilitate the Philippines’ application for a FMD-free declaration by the OIE, the DA had subdivided Luzon into three areas. Zone 1 or North Luzon comprises the Cordillera Administrative Region, Region II, and the province of Aurora in Region III, Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur and La Union in Region I; Zone 2 or Mid-Luzon covers Region III except the province of Aurora, Region IVA, National Capital Region and the province of Pangasinan in Region I; and Zone 3 or South Luzon includes Region IV-B and Region V.

Minimum Access Volumes: Minimum Access Volumes (MAV) for pork and all other commodities subject to MAV or Tariff Rate Quotas (TRQ) have not increased since 2005, when the Philippines reach its 10th/last year commitment under the WTO Uruguay Round. In February 2009, after extensive and spirited consultations with local stakeholders and main trading partners, then Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap announced that the current MAV system would remain in place and that no changes would be initiated under his watch. A new Secretary of Agriculture has been appointed in July 2010.

Data from the MAV Management Committee of the DA shows that in 2009, utilization rates of tariff-rate-quotas (TRQ) or MAV for pork increased from 58 per cent in 2008 to 69 per cent in 2009, indicating more imports of higher-value pork cuts, such as bellies and other cuts.

In the past, MAV usage for pork has been relatively low, due in part to the entry of large quantities of buffalo meat with a low tariff rate of 10 percent. Buffalo meat, from India, has been traditionally used in the Philippines as a substitute for pork by the local meat processing industry. MAV utilization increased significantly since 2008 due in part to the strength of the Philippine peso vis-à-vis the US dollar.

Tariff Rates: In-quota and out-of-quota tariff rates for MAV commodities have not changed since 2005. AFTA-CEPT tariff rates for frozen and chilled pork have been lowered to five per cent while AFTA-CEPT tariffs for processed pork products were eliminated starting January 2010 in full compliance with the AFTA.


Marketing:
San Miguel Corporation: On 31 May 2010, San Miguel Corporation (SMC) shareholders approved the sale of 51 per cent of its stakes in various core businesses, which include its poultry, livestock, feeds and packaging businesses for as much as $1 billion reportedly. During the shareholders meeting, SMC announced plans to further cut down the revenue share from its traditional food and beverage businesses and create a “more even” distribution with its power, infrastructure and energy portfolio. According its Chairman, SMC is still in talks with several buyers for the 49 percent stake in food subsidiary San Miguel Pure Foods.
 

July 2010
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on August 12, 2010, 12:13:40 PM
Wednesday, August 11, 2010
Canada Secures Access to the Philippines
CANADA - Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz has announced that Canadian exporters of rendered animal products have gained important access to Philippine markets that were previously closed to them. Canadian exports to the Philippines can begin immediately.



“Since coming to office, our Government has worked tirelessly to break down trade barriers around the world,” said Minister Ritz. “Our efforts are showing substantial results as Canadian farmers continue to gain access to new international markets to sell their top quality products”.

Following a concerted effort by government and industry, the Philippine government has agreed to open its market to Canadian rendered animal by-products including blood meal, poultry meal and fats.

The Canada Beef Export Federation estimates that the Philippine market for Canadian exporters of rendered products could reach $20 million.

“This announcement is great news for Canadian farmers who have gained expanded access to an important market of over 90 million people."

Last year, existing Canadian agri-food exports to the Philippines totalled $250 million.

The Government of Canada remains committed to creating trade opportunities and expanding international markets for Canadian farmers.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 16, 2010, 09:29:32 AM
BAI: Hog Farmers Asked to Try Low-cost Native Breed
PHILIPPINES - Hog producers who cannot cope with increasing prices of commercial feed might want to consider the alternative of raising native pigs, the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) said Wednesday.



“Native pigs can be raised without the use of chemical inputs and has high economic potential for those engaged in organic swine production," the bureau said in a statement.

BAI likewise said native pigs easily adapt to local conditions and can tolerate heat and cold environments better than imported swine.

“They can thrive well on locally-available feeds, including kitchen and farm refuse, and can cope with low quality feed and maintenance," it added.

According to GMA News.TV, the bureau said, without citing figures, that it hopes that the market for native pig — traditionally known as lechon or grilled pig — will expand.

Based on an ongoing study on the “Conservation, Evaluation, and Commercialisation of the Philippine Native Pigs," the bureau plans to establish a production system involving raising native pigs managed by farmers and with a view to propagating the practice as commerce.




Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 17, 2010, 09:33:24 AM
Raise Pigs, Chickens the Organic Way, Says BAI
PHILIPPINES - Recent findings and evaluations by the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) show that a plant scientifically known as Trichantera gigantea can be used economically for the production of organic pigs and chicken. Whole leaves of Trichantera could be fed to pigs, but need to be chopped for chicken.



Research at the BAI's National Swine and Poultry Research and Development Center (NSPRDC) in Tiaong, Quezon, showed that pigs fed Trichantera at 20 per cent level of replacement of commercial feed in growing-finishing rations produced cheaper liveweight gain, with cost per kilogram gain lower by 2 pesos compared to those fed a 100 per cent commercial ration. Pigs in both rations have similar liveweight gain and meat quality.

Trichantera is also palatable to and good for chicken and ducks. Ricky Malolos of St. Tomas, Batangas, raises native chicken and ducks but could only feed Trichantera to his free-range chicken due to limited area for growing the plant. He feeds chicken, with 50 per cent Trichantera and 50 per cent commercial feed which costs him an average of sixty centavos per head per day. Selling his chicken at 5 to 6 months old for 250 pesos/ head, he gets an average net return of 100 pesos/ head. He just sold 500 head for 125,000 pesos last June, which gave him an income of 50,000 pesos.

These results and observations prompted BAI Director Efren C. Nuestro to direct Dr Rene C. Santiago (Center Chief, NSPRDC) to go into massive propagation of the plant.

"Planting materials of Trichantera should be made readily available to enable farmers to benefit from the results of our research," Mr Nuestro said, following his recent visit to the Center and Ricky's farm. "This is consistent with the new Department of Agriculture's programme on organic farming," he further stressed.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 22, 2010, 10:28:38 AM
Tuesday, September 21, 2010        Pork Prices Drop as Consumers Shift to Chicken
PHILIPPINES - A shift in consumer demand for meat products has caused pork prices to drop by as much as P20 per kilo, the Department of Agriculture (DA) said yesterday.



In a radio interview, DA Assistant Secretary Salvador said the consumer shift from pork to chicken has brought down pork prices to about P160 to P170 a kilo from P180 to P190 a kilo in the first half of this year.

“The primary reason behind this is the shift in consumer demand. There is a close shifting pattern between pork and chicken, where Filipinos tend to shift to chicken commodity when pork prices are high, and vice-versa,” Mr Salacup said.

“Since chicken prices are much lower for now, Filipinos tend to favor broilers, resulting to lower prices in swine products,” the official added.

According to The Manila Times.net, last Saturday, Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala said DA, poultry raisers and market vendors have agreed on a standard reference price of P100 per kilogram for “unbranded” dressed chicken and P110 for “branded” chicken.

Dressed chicken now sells at P120 per kilogram, the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics said.

The department earlier reported that farm gate price of live chickens went down to P57 to 50 a kilo because of the surplus in supply. According to farmers, the break-even price for chicken production is P58 to P60.

To stem further losses, local poultry farmers threatened to suspend their operations, which may result to a shortage of chicken by the end of the year.

In line with this, Salacup said that DA will continue to monitor the prices in the coming months, when demand for the two commodities traditionally goes up.

DA Assistant Secretary for Livestock Davinio Catbagan had said the department would be meeting with poultry industry stakeholders today to discuss the possible intervention the government can do to ensure a stable supply of chicken in time for the holiday season.

Mr Catbagan said the government would try to avert the need to import chicken by the end of the year to bridge any supply gap.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: jenny_pretty18 on September 24, 2010, 01:41:51 AM
The government should reach out to our fellow poultry raisers and swine raisers. They should do something to fully avoid importation of chicken and meat. These could encourage our fellow poultry and swine raisers to continue and expand their business that could give more Filipinos employment and could give better economy..
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 24, 2010, 11:24:15 AM
Farming is about producing commodities and all commodities rise and fall depending on many factors.The comsumer is more buying saavey and will always look for the best possible deal for their protein sources.But as production cost rise and the farmgate prices fall,we all must decide what is in our best interest.We have seen in the past some will decide to exit the market.Producers tend to shy away from falling markets and look for other commodities to invest in.

We all the face the same problems worldwide when it comes to farming.Some of us will stay the course and trim our overhead expenses and ride out the downward trends and wait for our respected market to return to healthier times.

Not sure what the Govt. can really do for the average producer????
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on September 25, 2010, 10:11:53 AM
Meat imports hurt local producers
[24 September 2010] Pork imports into the Philippines from January to July 2010 totaled 115 million kg exceeding the entire 2009 imports of 114 million kg. Chicken imports too have surged in the first seven months and is close to surpassing last year’s total imports of 67 million kg. It is expected that buffalo meat imports would also further rise with the coming Christmas holidays. Pig and chicken farms are reeling from the entry of cheaper imported meat and there have been suggestions that the government curb the rising pork and chicken imports as it is hurting the local livestock and poultry sectors.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 19, 2010, 09:10:56 AM
RP to Re-open Pork Trade Talks with Singapore
PHILIPPINES - Manila may start renegotiating with Singapore on pork trade that was stalled as the two sides wait for results of the Ebola Reston antigen test done at the facilities of exporter Matutum Meat Packing Corp.



The test results will be sent to Singapore this week, according to the Bureau of Animal Industry.

“We are preparing to communicate with our Singaporean counterpart within the week. The tests conducted on accredited swine farms near the exporting meat plant proved negative to the Ebola antigen test," Animal Bureau Director Efren Nuestro told reporters at the sidelines of 18th anniversary of the National Meat Inspection Service.

Areas near and around the Matutum Meat facilities, including the five farms that were accredited to export pork to Singapore tested negative, the bureau said.

“We’ll immediately inform the farms if Singapore will allow the exportation so they can prepare the volume. Meanwhile we just have to wait," he added.

According to GMA News.tv, Singapore made it clear that Philippines should have an updated status report on viral contamination to ensure that the virus has been eradicated before the country starts exporting its meat.

An infection outbreak in several pig farms in Pandi, Bulacan in 2008 spoiled the country’s first bid to export 50 metric tons to Singapore. The outbreak had since been contained with the help of a 22-member team from three United Nations agencies.

Matutum Meat in Polomolok, South Cotabato was supposed to make its first export of pork and pork products to Singapore when the departments of Health and Agriculture confirmed the contamination in Bulacan.

Matutum Meat was the first and only Philippine meat processing plant accredited by the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore to ship pork products to the island nation.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 20, 2010, 09:45:22 AM
Philippines continue efforts to begin pork exports to Singapore
[20 October 2010] The Philippines will again try to renegotiate with Singapore in its efforts to begin pork exports to the city state. Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) Director Dr Efren Nuestro said that the BAI is drafting a letter to the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore this week, after livestock in the farms accredited for export tested negative for Ebola Reston virus (ERV). The Philippines was about to send its first batch of exports to Singapore in December 2008 when news that blood samples from pigs from Luzon tested positive for the ERV, prompting the Philippine government to voluntarily halt the shipment. Dr Nuestro said however that they have no target date for the initial shipment.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: redhill on October 21, 2010, 03:53:02 AM
above all the things that affects our economy, esp. local farmers who are all trying hard to make a decent living; behind are crooks, hungry savvy , corrupt government officials who only wants to fill their pockets with million of pesos commission from the close door deals they are getting into....alam na natin yan..kahit walang shortage basta kumita sila...wla silang pakialam, its the same scenario that happened to NFA. kapag nagka bukingan sila kung sino sino ang tinuturo....

mga Govt. officials na tiwali...mahiya kayo sa balat nyo....mga pinapakain nyo sa mga anak at pamilya nyo nakaw...tamaan sana kayo ng cancer...
mag resign na kayo...

despite the peso to dollar exchange rate nowadays is strong. ung mga presyo ng bilihin hindi na bumaba...prapaganda ng mga corrupt na opisyales sa gobyerno....ihahahanin na lang at kakainin ng taong bayan, gusto pa nyong pagkakitaan! sa mga corrupt at tiwaling nasa gobyerno, dapat kayo ang kumain ng tira tira na pagkaing baboy!
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on October 21, 2010, 10:35:20 AM
What I post about world current trends,I do so to help others understand what is happening globally in their respected livestock business venture.What goes around,comes around.Worldwide,pressures on decline in many livestock sectors.Right now we are in a decline mode.So true these added pressures create extra hardships on local producers.The hog industry in the Philippines has traditionally relied on the holiday season for better than average prices.Nothing in life is a given.

Every country has its GNP (gross national products)exports.The Philippines is an agriculture culture and the country has opportunities to capilize on this.Agriculture products for exports brings in hard currency for the state.Or would the state rather rely on OFWS and their money remittences as the states GNP.If the Philippines does not act on its agriculture strenghts,other countries will.The RP Govt. needs to be willing to send fact finding trade missions to other Asian nations to see what and where Philippines agriculture products can be exported to.The spin off off jobs this will create on home soil from the production level all the way to the loading of Made In The Philippines labels.In turn lets hope the citizens of the Philippines will be able to stay and live in the Philippines instead of having to leave their birth place for foreign lands as cheap labor.Opportunties are there just needs some Govt. intervention.

personal opinion only??????
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on November 09, 2010, 08:40:24 AM
Thai Food Firm Eyes Investment in Philippines
PHILIPPINES - On a recent visit, top officials of Charoen Pokphand Foods (CPF) indicated their company's interest in investing in feed, poultry and pig production in the Philippines.



Agriculture Secretary Proceso J. Alcala has thanked Thailand Ambassador to the Philippines, Kulkumut Singhara Na Ayudhaya, during the latter's recent courtesy call at the Department of Agriculture (DA) central office in Quezon City.

According to a government press release, Ambassador Ayudhaya had been joined by top officials of Charoen Pokphand Foods (CPF), Thailand's leading agro-industrial and food conglomerate, who expressed keen interest in investing in the country particularly on feed mill, poultry and piggery operations.

Secretary Alcala immediately tasked DA officials and agencies to assist CPF officials to realise their planned investment.

Last year, total trade between the Philippines and Thailand amounted to US$3.7 billion. The country's top agricultural exports to Thailand include tuna, cigars and cigarettes, and cereal products, while top agricultural imports include Thai rice, corn seeds and cassava starch or tapioca.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 02, 2010, 08:51:06 AM
DA Mulls Protection for Local Hog industry
PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture may propose raising the tariff rate on imported pork offals, an official said on Monday.



"Local hog farmers have asked the department to review the current 5 per cent duty on pork offal imports. So, this is being studied by department and it may recommend the increase of the duty to the Tariff and Related Matters body," Assistant Secretary for Livestock Davinio P. Catbagan said in a telephone interview.

Pork offals refer to parts usually discarded as waste or set aside for use in meat by-products, including the tail, hooves, blood, head, brain, heart and liver.

"After the [interagency] Tariff and Related Matters body reviews this, it will be forwarding its decision to the President, and only through an Executive Order may the tariff be adjusted," Mr Catbagan said.

Mr Catbagan noted that pork offals are relatively low-priced because these products are treated as waste in markets like the US and Canada. "They consider ears, tongue, cheeks, intestines, etc. as waste; but in the Philippines, these are used in our food," he said.

The 5 per cent duty on imported pork offals is mandated through Executive Order (EO) No. 84 issued on 15 March 2002. Under that EO, pork offals -- except for liver -- were to have a 7 per cent duty in 2002-2003 and 5 per cent starting in 2004, while liver was to have a 5 per cent duty from 2002.

In a separate phone interview, Albert R. T. Lim, Jr., president of the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines, Inc., welcomed the department’s move. "This is, of course, welcomed by the industry. The influx of cheap pork offals is hurting the local hog industry. These items are supposed to be supplied only to meat processors; however, the products are flooding wet markets," Mr. Lim said, adding that imported pork offals are "much cheaper" than locally-produced pork priced at around P170-P180 per kilogram.

Mr Lim could not say for sure how much imported pork offals are now priced in wet markets, Business World reports.

But Jesus C. Cham, president of the Meat Importers and Traders Association, said separately by phone that an increase in the pork offal import duty would be "unreasonable."

"This is unreasonable thinking, because our local hog producers have not developed a market for offals," Mr Cham said.

"Local hog producers sell whole hogs; so, naturally, they cannot compete with those selling by-products which are the offals. The entry of offals also enables consumers to purchase something cheaper," he argued.

Mr Cham added that it is "unreasonable" to say that pork offals should be supplied only to processors. "Products of the processors - for example, longganisa - will reach the markets in one way or another. It is cheaper to buy raw products, so why should it be available for processors only?"

As of 18 November, shipments of pork offals to the Philippines had reached 48,450 metric tons (MT), 67 per cent more than the 29,000 MT imported last year, Bureau of Animal Industry data showed.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 17, 2010, 10:14:32 AM
SMFI’s Sumilao hog farm fully operational
[17 December 2010]   San Miguel Foods Inc (SMFI) has finally begun operations of its hog farm and meat processing facility in Sumilao, Bukidnon Province that was mired in a land distribution controversy a few years back. Leo Obviar, General Manager of SMFI Poultry and Meats Business said that the facility, which now has 4400 sows and can produce 88 tonnes of processed meats annually, began full operations in mid-2010. Half of the facility’s total production will be for the Luzon market and the other half for local markets in Mindanao.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 25, 2010, 09:12:45 AM
Philippine hog raisers working to keep pigs disease free
[24 December 2010] Philippine hog raisers are drafting plans to help keep the industry disease free, citing the need for industry stakeholders to work with the government. Mr Edwin Chen, incoming President of the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines, Inc, said during a press conference for the launch of the Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits 2011 that hog farmers must work with government to “come up with a comprehensive solution addressing sanitary and health issues of the industry.” One of these strategies is to promote the concept of multi-site operation which will enhance disease control. The Convention is scheduled for March 17-19 at the Philippine International Convention Center in Pasay City.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 27, 2010, 10:07:13 AM
DDGS good alternative ingredient for swine feeds
[27 December 2010] DDGS is an excellent alternative feed ingredient that can dramatically reduce production cost of swine producers, Dr Jerry Shurson of the University of Minnesota told participants in the a seminar sponsored by the US Grains Council in Manila. He said that DDGS inclusion levels can reach up to 30% in all phases of production and even up to 50% in gestation. Studies have shown that feeding diets containing DDGS can improve gut health in the grower-finish stage, while it may also improve litter size weaned when fed at high levels to gestating and lactating sows.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 30, 2010, 10:22:12 AM
Backyard farm recovery puts modest Philippines hog production target within reach
[30 December 2010] The Philippine government's target to achieve a small 1% growth in local hog production for 2010 is possible, a report by BusinessWord said. The report quoted Bureau of Animal Industry Director Efren Nuestro as saying the target is “achievable,” as “diseases were controlled and prevented this year, and backyard farms have also recovered - although slowly - from the onslaught of typhoons in the last quarter of 2009.” He also said that the Christmas holidays should have provided an added boost for the hog industry's recovery as traditionally, demand picks up during this time.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: mikey on December 30, 2010, 10:29:49 AM
Dealers Want Tariff on Imported Pork Offal to Stay
PHILIPPINES - Meat dealers and importers want the Department of Agriculture to keep the 5-per cent tariff on imported pork offal, as raising it may place poor Filipinos at a disadvantage.


"If you increase the tariff on pork offal, dalawa ang tataaman. One is the consumers who directly consume offal and second, the meat processors because they use (pork) skin and fat for processing into canned meat goods," Jesus Cham, president of Meat Importers and Traders Association, told reporters in an interview

“These processed food products are cheap protein sources for the poor," he said.

The poor consume processed pork offal — lips, cheek, liver, skin and head — as substitute for fresh pork and chicken, and increasing the tariff on imported offal would subsequently increase the prices of processed food products, according to the association.

Filipinos who subsist on $1 a day would be hit the hardest if pork offal becomes more expensive, as they cannot afford fresh pork and chicken priced at P180 ($4) per kilo and P130 ($3.25) a kilo, respectively, Mr Cham noted.

"Pork offal is about $1 a kilo. For poor Filipinos who live on $1 a day, the prices of fresh pork estimated at around $4 a kilo and chicken at $3 a kilo are simply beyond their reach," he said.

Hog raisers had earlier complained the higher volume of imported pork offal competes with locally produced pork, according to GMA News.tv.

Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) data showed imported pork offal totaled 48,450 metric tons (MT) as of 18 November, compared to the 29,000 MT shipped to the country for the whole of 2009.

United States and Canada — where pork by-products are treated as waste — are the Philippines’ main sources of imported pork offal.

Pork liver, cheeks, and ears are used in sisig, a popular Filipino dish. Skewered grilled ears and skin are also a popular street food.

There is no limit to the volume of offal shipments to the Philippines.

"The Philippines joined the [World Trade Organization] 15 years ago. Since then, we have opened our market to the world. Importers and exporters of other countries have been able to introduce more products in the market place but our local producers have stood still," said Mr Cham.

In November, the Agriculture Department announced the possibility of increasing the 5-per cent duty on imported pork offal as hog raisers said it was starting to harm the industry.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 07, 2011, 04:48:57 AM
Pork Producers Consider First MBM Plant
PHILIPPINES - The country’s pork producers are weighing up the establishment of a meat and bone meal (MBM) processing plant to reduce dependence on imported feed ingredients.


Bonemeal refers to crushed or ground bones used as animal feed or soil fertilizer.

“We’re asking the government to render assistance in drafting a roadmap for the swine sector which is an important aspect in the creation of an MBM plant," Pork Producers Federation of the Phils. Inc. President Edwin Chen said in an interview yesterday.

He noted that the Philippines imports a lot of meat and bonemeal from Europe and the US but the Bureau of Animal Industry said it has no ready data on the volume of imported MBM for 2009 and 2010 although prices range between $350 (P15,320) to $400 (P17,508) per metric ton.

The Federation is looking at a timeframe of 4 to 5 years to construct the first plant, reports GMA News.

“We’re still on the planning stage. We need to get the roadmap drafted and going before we implement the programme that requires massive logistics like the MBM plant," said Mr Chen.

For hog feed, the Federation will formulate a poultry-based MBM and vice versa for poultry feed.

“This is to prevent diseases from spreading and mutating. The practice of feeding porcine MBM to hogs or swine can be categorized as cannibalism. Take the case of BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) or ‘mad-cow’ disease, where cows eat their own kind via bovine MBM," Chen explained.

MBM is a by-product of the rendering of animal carcasses and animal waste material from slaughterhouses. It is usually sold as high-protein meal additive or animal stockfeed and pet food.

Meanwhile, the federation will also try to enforce a multi-site system in raising hogs. The multi-site system will have separate locations for breeding, nurseries and grow-out stages.

“We can arrange with the backyard hog-raisers what stage they would want to go into. I suggest they can produce piglets and then we, the commercial raisers, will produce the finishers," said Mr Chen.

He added that the system will be self-sustaining for designated pork zones in the three major islands of the country.

It will also help keep tabs on parasites and viral infections that afflict hogs through the all-in, all-out system.

“This means that, we grow the pigs all at the same time and sell them all at the same time. So there will come a time that the building will be left with no occupants. There’s no host, so the parasites will die a natural death, leaving the structure clean and fit for the next season," Mr Chen explained.

Earlier, hog raisers raised alarm over the proliferation of imported frozen and 'botcha' or “double-dead’ meat in the wet markets.

Hog raisers alleged that frozen meat are being sold as fresh meat in wet markets and can be easily mistaken for 'botcha'.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 11, 2011, 10:30:17 AM
Chicken, Pork Imports Jumped in 2010
PHILIPPINES - Chicken and pork imports increased by 31 per cent and 34 per cent, respectively, from 2009, based on statistics released by the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI).


The Philippine Star reports that BAI data showed that as of 13 December, chicken imports had reached 97,197 tonnes compared to total imports of 67,265 tonnes for the whole of 2009.

Pork imports reached 172,626 tonnes from January to December last year, compared to only 114,365 tonnes for the whole of 2009.

The high increase is being criticised by local chicken and pork producers, who claim that their viability is threatened.

BAI figures show that there has been an increase in imports of chicken cuts, chicken leg quarters, whole chicken, deboned chicken and offals, while there has been a decline in imports of chicken fat and rind/skin.

As for pork, there has been a continued increase in all imports of pork cuts, pork bellies, deboned pork, fats, offals and pork rind/skin.

Imports of chicken cuts as of 13 December 2010 year amounted to 3,241 tonnes from the 2,993 tonnes imported in 2009.

Imports of chicken leg quarters increased by more than 10,000 tonnes last year to a total of 36,831 tonnes compared to the previous year's imports of only 26,372 tonnes.

Imports of whole chicken more than doubled last year to 603.2 tonnes compared to the 250.8 tonnes imported in 2009.

Likewise, imports of deboned chicken also increased this year to 56,064 tonnes compared to imports last year amounting to only 36,887 tonnes.

There was also a noticeable increase in imports of chicken offals this year with imports tripling to 121.1 tonnes compared to 2009's imports amounting to only 40.4 tonnes.

A decline in imports, on the other hand, was registered in chicken fats from 211.5 tonnes in 2009 to only 103.7 tonnes in 2010.

Likewise, imports of chicken rind/skin in 2010 fell to 232.2 tonnes from 510.7 tonnes the previous year.

According to The Philippine Star, imports of all kinds of pork products, on the other hand, registered significant increases with pork bellies almost doubling last year to 15,792 tonnes from only 8,587 tonnes in 2009.

Pork cuts imports increased to 54,876 tonnes in 2010 from only 34,196 tonnes the previous year.

Imports of pork offals also almost doubled to 52,502 tonnes from 28,959 tonnes in 2009.

Imports of deboned pork almost quadrupled to 108 tonnes from 27 tonnes in 2009, while imports of pork rind/skin increased to 20,461 tonnes in 2010 from 16,196 tonnes the previous year.

Pork fat imports were 28,888 tonnes in 2010 from 26,399 tonnes the previous year, reports The Philippine Star.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 20, 2011, 10:54:07 AM
Philippines - Small growth in pig production 14 Jan 2011
"Growth of 1 per cent [in local hog production] is achievable this year," Bureau of Animal Industry director Efren C. Nuestro said in a telephone interview on Thursday.
 
 
 
 
"Diseases were controlled and prevented this year, and backyard farms have also recovered - although slowly - from the onslaught of typhoons in the last quarter of 2009." In the nine months that ended in September, local hog production had increased by 0.74 per cent to 1.36 million metric tons (MT) from 1.35 million MT last year, data from the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) show.
Hog production grew 1.08 per cent to 1.88 million MT for the entire 2009 from 1.86 million MT the preceding year, the same data showed.
 
 
 
 
 
Mr Nuestro said seasonal "heightened demand" for the product in the fourth quarter because of the holiday season should have provided a boost to the industry’s recovery.
 
 
 
 
"There is a heightened demand for pork every fourth quarter because of the holidays. This will encourage more slaughtering of hogs and increase production," Mr Nuestro said.
 
 
 
 
 
According to BusinessWorld, he added that the Agriculture department has yet to come up with a growth target for the industry next year.
 
 
 
 
"After actual data of local hog production this year registers, then we will be meeting to craft plans, programs and targets for the industry," Mr Nuestro said.
 
 
 
In a separate telephone interview, Albert R. T. Lim, Jr., president of the Pork Producers Federation of the Phils., Inc., said any growth this year would be better than none.
 
 
 
 
"I really cannot say how much the industry will grow; but if local production can grow by 1 per cent,
that is very good, although minimal," Mr Lim said.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 21, 2011, 11:42:01 PM
Hog and poultry raisers in Pangasinan have called on the government to stop the importation of agricultural products in 2011, saying the imports were derailing the country’s effort to attain food self-sufficiency, according to Inquirer of the Philippines.
 
 
 
Rosendo So, vice president of the National Hog and Poultry Raisers Association of the Philippines, said the government should instead provide more support for stakeholders in the agricultural sector to attain food self-sufficiency.
 
 
 
 
 
He said: "Farmers, hog raisers and poultry growers are vital contributors to the food basket of our country."
 
 
 
 
 
He added that the importation of agricultural products, particularly rice, chicken and pork, has steadily increased since 2005.
 
 
 
 
For chicken alone, he said, the volume that entered the country increased by 71 per cent from 2005 to 2010.
 
 
 
 
"This year alone, the government allowed the importation of 97,197,041 kilograms of chicken, which [represents] about 31 per cent increase from the 67,264,871 kilograms in 2009," Mr So said.
He said the steep increase in the level of pork importation has alarmed hog raisers.
 
 
 
 
This year, he said, pork importation is 71 per cent higher than the 2005 level.
"Pork importation this year is 34 per cent higher than the 114,365,159 kilograms imported in 2009," Mr So said.
 
 
 
 
He said feed requirements for locally grown hog and chicken are shouldered by farmers. But in other countries, he said, governments support their farmers, making their products cheaper.
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 25, 2011, 02:32:39 AM
Philippines - Pork imports 24 Jan 2011
Pork imports reached 172,626 tonnes from January to December last year, compared to only 114,365 tonnes for the whole of 2009.
The high increase is being criticised by local chicken and pork producers, who claim that their viability is threatened .
 
 
As for pork, there has been a continued increase in all imports of pork cuts, pork bellies, deboned pork, fats, offals and pork rind/skin.
 
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on March 16, 2011, 01:43:42 AM
Monday, March 14, 2011Print This Page
Import Restrictions Following Dioxin Scare Removed
GLOBAL - Hong Kong, the Philippines and Serbia are to lift all import restrictions they introduced after the dioxin incident in Germany.


They are able to do so as they have received the necessary information and reassurance that the situation is under control and that products can be safely imported from the EU, according to European Commission Trade officials.

On 27 December 2010, the German authorities informed the European Commission that a batch of fatty acids, which was meant to be used for technical purposes, had been mixed with fat for the production of feed. At the earliest opportunity, the German authorities had imposed strict controls to ensure that no contaminated feed or food was placed on the EU market or exported to third countries.

A fact-finding mission by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO), the European Commission inspection service of the Health and Consumers Directorate General, took place in Germany from 26 to 28 January 2011.

The mission team did not find any deficiencies which would call into question the effectiveness of the corrective measures taken by the German authorities to tackle the contamination. These measures, which involved very significant resources, were found to have been carried out in a professional and competent manner.

The EU Member States, meeting in the framework of the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health on 22 February 2011 endorsed a statement recognising that the German authorities had been managing the contamination incident very efficiently and that they had adopted a very strict precautionary approach to manage the incident with a view to ensuring a high level of feed and food safety.

They determined that the contamination incident is fully under control by the German authorities and there is no risk that potentially contaminated food and feed are placed on the EU market or dispatched to third countries. "This incident has once more demonstrated the high reliability, capacity and effectiveness of the EU food safety system to identify and rectify problems which may arise. This is of great comfort not only to the EU consumer, but also to third countries importing from the EU," said the EC Trade office.

"Unfortunately however, the EU continues to face unjustified and serious import restrictions from several third countries. In most cases these restrictions affect pork products and/or Germany, while in a few cases, they affect all products of animal origin and/or all EU Member States.

"More specifically, we have been informed that:

Belarus and China have suspended imports of certain products from Germany;
Moldova, which lifted their ban on live animals, animal products and feed from Germany has introduced additional certification requirements to be provided by Germany (in practice, re-establishing a ban);
Argentina, Japan, Oman, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Ukraine have introduced "hold and dioxin testing" measures (before products are allowed to enter their countries)."
The European Commission - together with Germany and the EU Delegations in those third countries where import restrictions persist - continue to press the competent authorities to lift any remaining unjustified import bans or additional testing requirements. We also invite EU business to continue to inform us of any developments in this matter.

In 2010, exports of pig meat from the EU were valued at approximately €3.9 billion.

It is anticipated that the actions of the Market Access Partnership should lead to an increase in exports from this level in 2011.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on March 29, 2011, 09:20:59 AM
Friday, March 25, 2011
PIC Raises the Bar with New Gilt Production Units
PHILIPPINES - To serve the increasing demand from Filipino pork producers for superior performing PIC boars and gilts, PIC is expanding its production capacity by more than 5,000 GGP and GP sows in the Philippines.
 

PIC genetics have been proven to increase output and efficiency, a necessity in facing today’s challenges of increasing fuel and feed material costs, as well as the persistent health problems that hound local pork producers.

For nearly 50 years, PIC has been delivering true competitive advantage to pork producers worldwide by increasing output, efficiency and having a strong health assurance program that reduces the risks to both large commercial farmers as well as the smaller, home based pig producers. Over the last decade PIC has been successful in accelerating its rate of genetic improvement due to a new innovative production structure and continuing investments in research and development.

PIC Philippines further raises the bar in production technology, operations management, use of renewable energy and environmental management with the launching of 2 new, state-of-the-art gilt multiplication units. These units are by far the most biosecure and advanced facility design in swine production in the country to be built from the ground up. The facilities are built according to local conditions and will maximize the expression of the high performance potential of PIC animals.

PIC Philippines Production Manager, Mr. Patrick Ty says: “We are confident these 2 farms will be leaders in production efficiency and become shining examples of world class hog farming in the Philippines”. PIC Philippines, partnered with Venvi Agro-Industrial Ventures Corp., and RDF Meatshop, Inc. (RDFMI), two corporate powerhouses also engaged in poultry production, real estate development and meat retail.

Construction of the Venvi-Agro 2,400-sow level Camborough gilt production unit began in August 2010, on a biosecure location within a 460 hectare property in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte. The site scored very high on the PIC 1,000 point health risk assessment system. Designed as a 2-site (breed-to-farrow and wean-to-finish) production facility with climate control and automatic feeding systems, this unit will eventually be energy-positive as power is produced with methane fueled generators and solar power. Initial stocking started in January 2011 and will produce both PIC Grand Parent gilts and Camborough Parent Gilts by the fourth quarter of 2011.

PIC has built a strong relationship with Venvi Agro-Industrial Ventures Corp., a division of Venvi Group of Companies, an innovative and pioneering organization committed to producing high quality food products and being globally competitive in feeding our people. They are the largest supplier of chicken eggs in Ilocos region and continue to bring pride to Ilocos due to its honorable corporate values and commitment to innovation and social progress. “Having understood the level of investment needed to become a serious player in this business and seeing the market opportunities from visiting commercial operations around the country and the US, we decided to get things right from the start by choosing the right partners. With PIC’s help, we have properly addressed the factors - genetics, facilities, health, technology and people - needed to shorten the learning curve and make this a successful venture”, said Atty. Larry Valdez, President of Venvi Agro.

A long time PIC customer that has grown over the years from a 200 sow level commercial farm when it started its hog business a decade ago, RDF Meatshop, Inc., held the groundbreaking ceremony for its new 2,500 sow level unit last February 2011 in a biosecure location in Tarlac. RDFMI also signed up with PIC as a Camborough 24 parent gilt multiplier for this new production unit. Operating under a 2-site production system, building facilities are equipped with climate control, automatic feeding systems and methane powered generators. RDFMI is the company behind the immense success of the Fresh Options meat shop chain currently running more than 70 branches in Pampanga, Bulacan, Bataan, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Olongapo, Zambales and Mega Manila, and still growing. RDFMI has chosen PIC as the breed of choice in growing their meat retailing business as PIC meets Fresh Options’ high standards in providing quality meats for their MEATiculous customers.

“We are happy with the trust and commitment by our proactive partners, Venvi and RDFMI, in working with us on these projects to support the growing needs of our customers. Together, we look forward to providing local producers with more access points for superior genetics that will set a new standard for the Philippine pork industry ,” said Mr. Vino Borromeo, PIC Philippines General Manager.

With the addition of RDFMI and Venvi-Agro, PIC Philippines has grown its production capacity into 14 multiplication units, 3 genetic nucleus sites, and 5 distribution centers spread across the country. PIC Philippines turns 15 years this year in bringing healthy genetic improvement to Filipino producers since its first importation of live animals in 1996.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on April 09, 2011, 02:21:31 AM
Friday, April 08, 2011
PIC Strengthens Leadership Position in the Philippines
PHILIPPINES - PIC Philippines celebrates its 15th anniversary by announcing two milestone agreements to grow its dam line production base by more than 5,000 GGPs and GPs.
 

These additions enhance the existing supply network of 3 nucleus farms, 12 multiplication units and 5 distribution centres spread across the archipelago and reinforce PIC’s position as the leading supplier of healthy genetics to the nation’s 1.6m sow herd.

PIC has partnered with two corporate powerhouses, Venvi Agro-Industrial Ventures Corp. and RDF Meatshop, Inc., who are also engaged in poultry and egg production, real estate development and meat retail to develop the projects in Luzon.

Construction of the Venvi-Agro 2,400-sow level facility began in August 2010, within a 460 hectare property in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte. It is a 2-site system with climate control and automatic feeding systems. The farm will be energy-positive as power will be produced from methane fueled generators and solar power. The initial stocking started in January 2011 and sales of breeders will start before year-end. Atty. Larry Valdez, President of Venvi Agro, said, “Having understood the level of investment needed to become a serious player in this business and seeing the market opportunities from visiting commercial operations around the country and the US, we decided to get things right from the start by choosing the right partners. With PIC’s help, we have properly addressed the factors - genetics, facilities, health, technology and people - needed to shorten the learning curve and make this a successful venture.”

RDF Meatshop, Inc., held the groundbreaking ceremony for its 2,500 sow unit in Tarlac in February, with stocking scheduled for the 3rd quarter of 2011. The buildings are equipped with climate control, automatic feeding systems and methane powered generators. RDFMI is the company behind the immense success of the Fresh Options meat shop chain currently running more than 70 branches in 8 provinces, and still growing. It began its first venture into pork production with PIC seven years ago with a 600 sow commercial unit. Despite quadrupling the size of that farm, demand from the meat shops continues to outstrip supply. Building on that success, RDFMI favors PIC as the genetics of choice in expanding its operations as PIC meets Fresh Options’ high standards in providing quality meats for their customers.

Vincent Borromeo, PIC Philippines General Manager, commented, “We are delighted to be working with such proactive partners in moving these projects forward. Supply side limitations have been a constraint to growing our share of the market. Now we look forward to providing local producers with greater availability of superior, healthy genetics that will set the pace for faster genetic improvement in the Philippines.”

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on June 01, 2011, 06:26:53 AM
Govt sees FMD-free stamp boosting pork exports05/30/2011 | 03:52 PM

   
The Philippines expects a boost in its pork exports after the World Organization for Animal Health last week declared the country free of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala said Monday.

In behalf of the Philippine government, Agriculture Assistant Secretary for Livestock Davinio Catbagan received the certification on Thursday from the 87-year-old animal health organization, which keeps its initial and historical name Office International des Epizooties (OIE).

“We are expecting that negotiations with Singapore and Malaysia will bring new business to our pork industry. I figure that livestock output will pick up again now that producers have found a reason to increase local production," Alcala said.

Catbagan added that the country’s FMD-free status will enhance productivity by allowing swine raisers and meat processors to freely transport and trade live animals, and livestock and pork products within the Philippines.

In March, Catbagan said the government was “99.9-percent" confident that the OIE will declare the Philippines entirely FMD-free.

A highly contagious viral disease, FMD infects cloven-hoofed animals like pigs, cows, goats and sheeps. It does not affect humans.

In its latest quarterly report, the Agriculture Department said the livestock subsector recorded a growth of 0.59 percent in the first quarter, amounting to around P49.7 billion at current prices. — PE/VS, GMA News
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on June 05, 2011, 08:47:31 AM
Friday, June 03, 2011
One Ton of Tainted Pork Seized in Bulacan
PHILIPPINES - At least a ton of tainted pork was intercepted while it was being brought to the local market in Bulacan province's Marilao town on Thursday night.


Police acting on a tip caught a tricycle driver transporting the meat in Loma de Gato village, reports GMA News, citing Radio DzBB.

The driver, initially identified as Reynaldo Bendam, was brought to a local police station for questioning.

Mr Bendam also faces added sanctions after he failed to present a driver's license, the report said.

Thursday night's incident happened when authorities were on alert against the selling of tainted fish from some areas in Batangas and Pangasinan that were affected by a recent fish kill.

In Metro Manila, authorities had seized several hundred kilos of double-dead fish during searches at public market stalls.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on June 17, 2011, 12:10:43 PM
Thursday, June 16, 2011
Erysipelas Outbreak in Catanduanes
PHILIPPINES - At least 17 pigs have been killed and 172 more are sick in three villages in Pandan town in Catanduanes due to erysipelas.


A 'pig kill' in three barangays of Pandan, Catanduanes caused by an infectious disease recently stirred hog raisers and veterinary experts in the island province of Catanduanes into a near pandemonium, reports Phil Star. The outbreak was later blamed on poor sanitation.

Governor Joseph Cua received a report from Pandan town Mayor, Restituto de Quiroz, that at least 15 pigs died and 172 others got sick over a three-day period in the villages of Del Sur, Libod and Napo, in the coastal town located at the northern section of the province.

The governor said he promptly dispatched a five-man team from the Provincial Veterinary Office (PVO) headed by provincial veterinarian, Peter Aldin Azanza, to assist the Municipal Agriculture Office (MAO) in looking into the problem.

Following visual inspections on the site of the disease outbreak and necropsy performed on affected animals, Mr Azanza reported that the culprit was a swine pathogen called erysipelas. He said the virus developed at the water, soil, decaying organic matter, slime on the bodies of fish and on carcasses as well as in carrier pigs causing the spread of the disease.

The symptoms of infections, according to Azanza include the purple discoloration of the ears, snout and abdomen of the pigs, diamond-shaped skin lesions, high body temperature, poor appetite and restlessness.

Don't eat pig victims, warns vet
Mr Azanza said that the affected animals is hazardous to human health. "The affected animals are no longer fit for human consumption," he stressed.

The infected hogs were supposed to be injected with amoxicillin but De Quiroz said the lack of medicines in the municipality prevented them from doing so. Governor Cua then instructed the PVO to provide the medicines at the expense of the provincial government.

The visual inspection conducted by the team also found out that majority of the backyard hog raisers have not provided proper waste disposal facilities for animal manure while some homes do not even have toilets.

The situation, Mr Azanza said, left no choice for the hog raisers and household members but to dispose animal and human wastes in public canals and along the shorelines that result to pollution of the nearby swamp whose water circulates with the sea tides.

The PVO team recommended that a temporary quarantine be implemented in the three villages affected by the outbreak to prevent the spread of the disease. The Phil Star report adds that the team also recommended to the local government the strict implementation of the ordinance on the proper waste disposal to prevent serious health problems.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on July 05, 2011, 10:34:12 AM
Monday, July 04, 2011
DA to Meet with Chicken and Pork Producers
PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture will meet this week with chicken and pork producers to ensure sufficient supply of meat products.


DA Secretary Proceso Alcala said his department will seek inputs from the producers as it makes plans to ensure meat supply until at least January 2012.

He said that while chicken growers can grow chickens in as little as 35 days, hog growers need as many as "four to six months."

According to GMA News, Mr Alcala said the DA is making projections for at least December, to make sure prices of meat products are affordable to consumers.

The DA is also making plans to "ensure supply of meat products not only for Christmas but also up to one month after Christmas," Mr Alcala said.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on July 30, 2011, 11:19:51 AM
Friday, July 29, 2011
Pig Manure Could Mean Big Bucks
PHILIPPINES - Renewable energy investors should already tap the cash-rich European carbon-credit market before it closes its doors to developing countries by 2012, an industry expert said.


First Gen Corp. Vice President Al Santos explained the European market will only accept carbon credits from least developed countries after that. "The projects should already be registered now for sale of carbon credits before the end of 2012."

The European Union created carbon trading in order to mitigate the growth in concentrations of greenhouse gases. Any company that exceeds the limits, or the so-called compliance buyer, has to buy credits from renewable energy technologies in order to cut its carbon emissions.

According to ABS-CBN News, these companies earn these "credits" from projects registered under the United Nations Framework for Climate Change (UNFCC).

Of the 3,000 projects currently registered, 32 are from the Philippines.

Mr Santos said even small companies tap this trading system because of its benefits.

"Per ton of certification emission reduction - we have anywhere from 10 to 12 euros. What it's supposed to do is for marginal projects, with the additional revenues from the sale of carbon credits it's supposed to improve the returns so that the project will go ahead," he said.

Even the swine industry knows its benefits.

Mr Santos said, "The projects registered under one application are mostly in the swine industry for the methane capture from the pig waste and use to power an engine. The credit of methane is 21 times carbon dioxide - so a ton of methane is equivalent to 21 tons of carbon dioxide emission."

One carbon credit is equal to one metric ton of carbon dioxide.

Pig manure can be converted to biogas, which is used in power generation. For example, Cavite Pig City in General Trias produces less than 1 megawatt for its own use.

Mr Santos said, however, that a company needs to cough up about a million in order to have its project registered with the UNFCC.

"It's not cheap. You need to hire a consultant to put together the documentation; you need to get a third-party validator to assess the application and look at the project; and then you submit it to the board - so that could already cost a million pesos. If you have a small project, it's hard to justify you're spending a million pesos to get a project registered," he said.

On the other hand, the benefits would easily offset the cost needed for registration. Companies could also group themselves under one application.

"If the projects are small in scale - what they do is they bundle a number of projects under one application to save on costs. It's like cooperative-type," he said.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on July 31, 2011, 02:04:33 AM
Friday, July 29, 2011
Best Genetics and Cavite Pig City Form Partnership
US & PHILIPPINES - The National Swine Registry (NSR) announces the securement of a partnership between America's Best Genetics - the umbrella organization that represents US breeders who raise purebred swine with a commercial focus and specialise in international exports, and Cavite Pig City near Manila, Philippines.


The partnership includes delivery of 645 head of purebred Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire breeding boars and gilts that arrived 10 July in Cavite, as well as a two-year America's Best Genetics consulting agreement with geneticists of the National Swine Registry.

The partnership is notable as it is the largest single shipment of swine into the Philippines in more than 10 years, according to the Bureau of Animal Industry of the Philippines. Additionally, it initiates a formal consulting agreement with an international firm from America's Best Genetics.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for us to build a long-term working relationship with Cavite Pig City, to not only supply them with nucleus genetics from the world's most highly-regarded purebred breeders, but to also assist them in implementing the entire America's Best Genetics breeding program from the ground up," says Dr Clint Schwab, NSR director of genetic and technical services and interim CEO.

America's Best Genetics geneticists will work with Cavite Pig City owners and employees to develop genetic and management standard operating procedures, which includes data recording, off-test procedures, sire and replacement female selection and mating allocations. Dr Schwab, along with NSR Genetic Programmes Specialist Dr Justin Fix, have both visited Cavite Pig City within the past year to tour the facilities and discuss future goals of the partnership. They plan to return to initiate formal consultation in August.

Export manager Tony Clayton of Clayton Agri-Marketing in Jefferson City, Missouri, who arranged logistics of the partial charter of swine that shipped out of Chicago O'Hare International Airport, says the agreement is a tremendous accomplishment for all parties involved.

"A transaction of this size takes a lot of behind-the-scenes work on the part of many players - especially when dealing with biosecurity issues and working to protect the newly-gained foot and mouth disease-free status of the Philippines," says Mr Clayton.

In-country arrangements to the 8,000 plus-sow Cavite Pig City unit were made by Philippine importer Bobby Badilla of Carmel Import/Export Corporation in Paranaque City, Philippines. Other parties involved in the process include Ten Fold Customs Brokerage and Transport Corp.; the Philippines Bureau of Animal Industry under the direction of Efren Nuestro; and the USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in Manila, including Agricultural Counselor Philip Shull and staff.


Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on August 12, 2011, 10:32:15 AM
Thursday, August 11, 2011
New Website for Meriden Philippines
PHILIPPINES - Meriden Philippines has recently launched a new website, www.meriden-phils.com.

The website is the result of feedback from customers who required more information about the unique products that are marketed in the Philippines.

Corazon P. Occidental, Managing Director of Meriden Phils Inc, says: "We are delighted to be able to respond to our customers suggestions and provide them with a valuable source of information on the products we carry."

"We now welcome our customers’ views on the new website so we can carry on improving our service to them."

You can visit the new website here: www.meriden-phils.com

Or visit the Meriden Animal Health website: www.meriden-ah.com



Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on August 17, 2011, 10:59:20 AM
Tuesday, August 16, 2011
Agricultural Output up Five Per Cent
PHILIPPINES - Agricultural output increased by 5.5 per cent, mainly due to increases in rice, corn and sugarcane production. Poultry meat and egg production was up more than three per cent, pig meat by one per cent and fishery output was down three per cent.


Agriculture Secretary Proceso J. Alcala has credited rice and corn for the expansion of the farm sector by 5.48 per cent in the first semester, according to Manila Bulletin. Palay (rice) yielded 7.58 million metric tons (MMT) and corn notched 3.31MMT to increase the crops sub-sector's growth to 11.1 per cent. This sub-sector contributed 51.8 per cent in total agricultural output.

The livestock and poultry sub-sectors, which grew by 0.85 per cent and 3.6 per cent, respectively, also added modestly to the gain of the first half of 2011.

Fisheries dipped by 2.9 per cent, as commercial and municipal fish catch slid during the semester.

The gross value of agricultural output amounted to 706.4 billion pesos (PHP) at current prices, about 16 per cent higher than last year's level.

Among major crops, sugarcane made a full recovery from the effects of a dry spell last year, and grew by 75.6 per cent.

The crops sub-sector grossed PHP411.8 billion at current prices, 31.1 per cent more than last year.

Livestock, which accounted for 15.3 per cent of total agricultural production, registered a 0.85 per cent rise in output this year. Hog output went up by one per cent. Gross value was placed at PHP103.1 billion at current prices, 1.6 per cent lower than last year.

The poultry sub-sector grew by 3.6 per cent, grossing PHP77.8 billion. Production of chicken grew by 3.8 per cent, while chicken eggs increased by 3.5 per cent. The sub-sector contributed 13.4 per cent to total agricultural production.

Manila Bulletin reports that the fisheries sub-sector – which had a share of 19.6 per cent to total agricultural production – dipped by 2.9 per cent during the first semester, as commercial and municipal fish catch decreased by 15.6 per cent and 2.7 per cent, respectively.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on September 04, 2011, 10:30:19 AM
Friday, September 02, 2011
500 Kilos of Tainted Pork Seized in Manila
MANILA, PHILIPPINES - Authorities acting on a tip seized some 500 kilos of tainted pork ("botcha") in Manila yesterday at midnight.


Inspection teams from the Manila veterinary office found the meat inside a cart near the railroad along Claro M. Recto Avenue, radio dzBB reported early Friday.

The pork was hidden under a layer of vegetables in what the inspection team suspected was an attempt to fool them, the report said.

According to GMA News, initial investigation showed the tainted meat was to be brought to markets in the Divisoria area, where it was to be sold at a lower price.

The report said the meat was brought to the Vitas Slaughterhouse.

A separate report on dwIZ said vendors at the Divisoria market were mum on the source of the tainted meat, which authorities said would be fed to crocodiles at the Manila Zoo.

Authorities have started stepping up their watch against tainted meat, since demand for the product is expected to rise as the Christmas season approaches.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on September 06, 2011, 10:35:39 AM
Monday, September 05, 2011
Authorities Seize More Tainted Pork in Manila
MANILA, PHILIPPINES - Some 400 kilos of "botcha" or "double-dead" (tainted) pork aboard a pedicab were seized in Manila's Divisoria district before dawn today.


City veterinary office operatives acting on a tip intercepted the pedicab at the corner of Dagupan and C.M. Recto Streets, radio dzBB's Paulo Santos reported.

According to GMA News, the report said some of the meat already smelled bad, while some of the meat was cut into portions to be mixed with fresh meat and sold in the market.

It quoted pedicab driver Danilo Nuque as saying he was told by a man riding in a taxi to deliver the meat to a certain "Michael" at the Divisoria Market.

Mr Nuque claimed he did not know the man aboard the taxi but he knew "Michael", the report added.

Dr Hector Dimaculangan of the city veterinary office said the "menudo-cut" was a ploy by those selling the tainted meat to slip past authorities and mix the tainted meat with fresh meat.
He said they expect more attempts by unscrupulous parties to sell such tainted meat since demand is likely to rise as the Christmas season approaches.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on September 07, 2011, 09:44:24 AM
That's one factor why consumers opt to buy chicken rather than pork meat because of this botcha "double dead meat" issue.  Then prices will go down... :-[
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on September 08, 2011, 10:46:22 AM
Wednesday, September 07, 2011
More Tainted Pork Seized in Manila; One Arrested
PHILIPPINES - Authorities seized 250 kilos of tainted pork loaded aboard a semi-stainless pickup in Manila’s Paco district before dawn yesterday.


City veterinary inspection teams arrested the helper of the pickup even as the driver managed to elude arrest, radio dzBB’s Manny Vargas reported.

It was the third seizure of tainted meat in one week, and the second in the last two days, GMA News reports. On Monday, 400 kilos of tainted meat aboard a pedicab were seized in Divisoria.

The pickup (CRD-791), allegedly from Pulilan town in Bulacan province, was spotted at about 1 a.m. along Paz Street in Paco, Manila.

An initial investigation showed the meat was to be taken to Paco Market.

While the driver of the pickup managed to escape, the team arrested one Richard Cruz, 18, the driver’s helper.

Authorities said they expect to make more seizures as the Christmas season draws closer, due to the expected rise in demand for meat during the season.

Meanwhile, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources intercepted two tons of illegally caught fish in Manila, according to a separate report on dzBB.

The report said the fish was aboard a boat that docked at Del Pan in Manila. The fish supposedly came from Palawan province but there were signs they were caught via dynamite fishing.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on October 20, 2011, 07:59:36 AM
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Pork Producers Urge Special Corn Importation Permit
PHILIPPINES - A group of local pork producers has asked the Department of Agriculture (DA) to issue a special import permit for corn to drive down domestic prices, which soared following a string of typhoons.


In a letter to Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala, the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines Inc. requested a special import permit at zero tariff for six months.

"If the 35 per cent tariff on imported corn is lifted for six months, our organization can purchase cheaper produce and distribute this to our members," said Edwin Chen, president of Pro-pork.

According to The Manila Times.net, Mr Chen said lower corn prices would help stabilize livestock feed prices, as well as maintain current pricing of pork and meat products.

He said the group is looking to import at least 50,000 metric tons of corn to drive down prices in the domestic market, which remain artificially high because of reported "damages" brought by typhoons Pedring and Quiel.

Corn is the main staple for hog feeds, and an increase in prices would also drive higher the prices of meat products.

It makes up 50 per cent to 60 per cent of animal feed formulation while soybean, which provides protein, makes up 20 per cent to 25 per cent. Fishmeal, another source of protein, vitamins and minerals, accounts for the balance.

To date, the average price of corn reached P15 per kilo, higher than the P12 per kilo that hog raisers used to pay.

"The high corn price is already taking a toll on the swine industry because of its domino effect on production cost," Mr Chen said.

The executive also said that if the prices of corn will not stabilize soon, this would result in losses for hog farmers who are still reeling form the devastating effects of natural disasters and disease.

"This may even force the closure of several hog farms, especially those among the backyard producers who do not have the capital to shoulder the additional cost," Mr Chen said.

He asked Mr Alcala to reassure hog raisers that the country has enough corn stocks to meet the requirement, and file charges against traders manipulating prices.

"According to reports, 90 per cent of corn crops have already been harvested before the typhoon. So why is it that prices are still going up? What we want is to at least drive down prices with the special importation," Mr Chen said. He said Pro-pork is already in talks with the Philippine Association of Feed Millers Inc. (PAFMI) for the said importation.

Earlier, PAFMI said they were "keeping their options open" for the possible importation of corn feeds early next year because of the reported damage to crops by two recent typhoons.

Norman Ramos, PAFMI president, said they are seeking an official report from the DA on the extent of the damage in the corn sector.

"Our concern will focus on the actual standing crop damaged by the typhoons and how much is submerged by the floods because over a period of time, this corn will deteriorate," Mr Ramos said.

"If the corn quality is questionable, then we will decide whether we will import," the executive said.

The DA earlier said that over 90 per cent of corn crops were harvested before typhoons Pedring and Quiel hit the country, while the remaining 10 per cent can still be recovered using dry facilities provided to those who were affected by floods.

But Mr Ramos, who is also the vice president and general manager of the feeds business of San Miguel Foods Inc., said there was no assurance from the DA that the harvested corn crops were properly dried, which may potentially compromise its quality.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on November 24, 2011, 11:56:32 AM
Wednesday, November 23, 2011
Pork and Poultry Meat Supplies Likely to be Tight
PHILIPPINES - Meat processors are warning of a shortage of pork and poultry meat for Christmas and high prices in the New Year, blaming the agriculture department for not issuing sufficient import permits.


Meat processors have warned of pork and chicken supply shortage in the coming holiday season due to the government's non-issuance of permits to import pork parts and chicken leg quarters, according to ABS-CBN News.

Francisco Buencamino, executive director of Philippine Association of Meat Processors, and Jesus Cham, president of the Meat Importers and Traders Association, complained that the Department of Agriculture (DA) has not released all import clearances for pork and chicken since 3 November.

The two said the department's action has compromised the supply of meat products for the Christmas season.

While the two admitted that the DA's move will help local farmers increase the price of local produce, they said it will have an impact on processors who make ham, chicharon, canned meat like meat loaf and luncheon meat, and hot dogs that are usually given out and served during holiday celebrations.

They said the non-issuance of permits will also affect the supply of chicken leg quarters, laman loob, liempo and other choice parts.

Mr Cham said supply will tighten if manufacturers compete with ordinary consumers in getting the produce of local pig farmers, eventually leading to a spike in pork and chicken prices.

With the delay in the issuance of import permits, Mr Cham said a meat shortage as well as a five to 10 per cent increase in prices of products with imported meat components will be experienced by January next year.

According to ABS-CBN News, Mr Buencamino called on Agriculture Secretary, Proceso Alcala, to reconsider its decision and realise that the government also needs to protect consumers, not just farmers.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 28, 2012, 11:32:42 AM
Friday, January 27, 2012
Philippine's Agriculture Sector Grew by 2.34% in 2011
PHILIPPINES - The Philippine agriculture industry grew by 2.34 per cent in 2011, bannered by the crops, livestock and poultry subsectors, the Department of Agriculture (DA) said Wednesday.


The DA said the combined positive performance of the three subsectors served as a cushion, as the fishery subsector registered negative growth due to dwindling fish population caused by overfishing, illegal fishing practices, and successive typhoons during the second semester of 2011.

Total farm production was valued at P1.4 trillion at current prices, 11.5 per cent more than in 2010, it said.

The crops subsector — which contributed one-half or 49.6 per cent to total agricultural output — registered a 4.82 per cent increase, led by palay (paddy rice) and corn.

Likewise, palay harvest totaled 16.68 million metric tons (MMT), 5.8 per cent more than in 2010 (15.77 MMT), while corn production amounted to 6.97 MMT, 9.3 per cent more than in 2010 (6.38 MMT).

Sugarcane production also grew significantly to 28.38 MMT, 58.3 per cent more than in 2010 (17.93 MMT). Tobacco, pineapple and rubber also posted positive gains last year.

Total gross value of production of the crops subsector reached P804 billion at current prices, 19.4 per cent more than in 2010.

The livestock subsector, which contributed 16 per cent to the total agricultural output, registered a 1.99 per cent growth. It was led by the hog industry which produced 1.94 MMT, 2.2 per cent more than in 2010 (1.89 MMT). Cattle and dairy production also increased by 1.8 per cent and 3.7 per cent, respectively.

The livestock subsector grossed P212.9 billion at current prices, one percent higher than in 2010.

Chicken production increased by 4.5 per cent, while chicken egg production moved up by 4.2 per cent. Total value of poultry products amounted to P158.8 billion at current prices.

The fisheries subsector, which accounted for one-fifth or 20.7 per cent to total agriculture output, decreased by 4.1 per cent, as commercial and municipal fish production dipped by 16.3 per cent and 2.9 per cent, respectively. Aquaculture production, however, grew by 2.4 per cent.

The fishery subsector grossed P225.1 billion at current prices, 1.85 per cent more than in 2010.

Commercial and municipal fish catch declined due to overfishing, illegal fishing activities, and rough seas and strong winds during the second semester caused by several typhoons. Meanwhile, the DA, through the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, will implement conservation policies and measures, like imposing no fishing during breeding season at selected seas to allow fish stocks to regenerate.

Earlier, the DA-BFAR implemented a three-month no fishing season for sardines at Sulu and Visayan Seas, starting 1 December, 2011. The policy is implemented in consultation and coordination with commercial and municipal fishermen and industry stakeholders.

Overall, farmers, fishers and ruralfolk were better off in 2011, as farmgate prices of various farm and fishery products increased by about nine per cent. Farmers of major crops enjoyed higher average prices, at 14 per cent more than in 2010.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on February 04, 2012, 01:15:24 PM
Friday, February 03, 2012
TOPIGS Philippines Imports Top Genetics
PHILIPPINES - TOPIGS Philippines recently imported 1111 top SPF genetics from Canada to set up a new nucleus farm for San Miguel Foods, Inc. (SMFI) in the Isabela province of the country. Thanks to this import, San Miguel can produce their own grandparent and parent breeding pigs for the realisation of their expansion plans through to 2020.

The imported nucleus herd will be linked to TOPIGS’ Pigbase, the world’s largest database for pig breeding with data from over 23 million pigs.

 Combined with the expertise and knowledge of TOPIGS, this will enable San Miguel to achieve the highest possible genetic progress in their population.

For the past two years, TOPIGS has been delivering gilts and boars for the replacement requirements of San Miguel. The initial results of the performance of these animals were reflected in substantial improvements in the operation of the nucleus farm as well as further opportunities to achieve higher results.

"We are happy to have TOPIGS as a partner now the company is continuing its expansion programme through to 2020," says Dr Leo A. Obviar, VP and GM of SMFI Poultry and Meat Business.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on March 23, 2012, 08:28:56 AM
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
PIC Continues to Grow Production of Camborough Breeders
PHILIPPINES - Uni-rich Agro Industrial Corp., a customer-turned-multiplier in Tarlac, will be all set to supply its homegrown PIC stocks by June.
 

After having been a satisfied customer of PIC for many years, the management entered into a supply agreement with PIC in May 2011 to allocate a 500-sow module for GPs to produce Camborough 24 parent gilts. This will make more parent gilts available to PIC customers and support conversion of the 1,000-sow Uni-rich commercial herd to 100 per cent PIC genetics.

“We are delighted about this development with Uni-rich, and we’re honored for the trust that has been given to PIC through the years. Having high standards not only in genetics, but also in health and technical services, they have seen a competent partner in PIC that has and will continue to deliver their requirements,” said Emmanuel Go, PIC Sales and Marketing Manager.

Uni-rich Performance. First gilts farrowed in January 2012
Litter Size Pre-wean Mortality Nursery Mortality Weaning Weight @ 24 days
Total Born Born Alive       
15 12 5% 0% 6.8 kg




Seated from left: Edmund Tan, Nicholas Uy, Andrew Bateson, Vino Borromeo
Standing: Erwin Fajardo, Patrick Ty, Gerry Lim, Emmanuel Go



Truck disinfection facility
As part of their commitment to PIC’s strict health assurance program, Uni-rich has invested in an automated truck disinfection facility, shower-in shower-out facility, reconstruction of employees’ quarters, and subdivision of the farm into 2 modules.

Uni-rich adds to the existing supply network of PIC that consists of 4 nucleus farms, 13 multiplication units and 5 distribution centers spread across the country. This development reinforces PIC’s position as the leading supplier of healthy genetics to the nation’s 1.6m sow herd.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on April 24, 2012, 06:51:42 AM
Monday, April 23, 2012
PIC Sets New Record with San Miguel Foods, Inc.
PHILIPPINES - PIC Philippines has flown in 1,317 GGP and GP breeders from Canada to stock the first phase of the newly constructed 5,000-sow unit of San Miguel Foods, Inc. (SMFI) in Quezon province.
 



Chartered B747 with PIC GGP and GP breeders onboard enroute from Chicago to Manila.



Unloading of 27 crates at the Manila airport cargo terminal.



PIC GGP breeder happy to arrive in the Philippines.



Refilling of drinkers and preparation of animals for land trip upon arrival.



Stopover for checking of animals and refilling of drinkers halfway to Tagkawayan, QuezonSetting a new record for the largest single airlift of breeding stock into the country, the Boeing 747 charter landed in Manila on 22 February. This is the first of two full plane loads of the latest high health PIC genetics scheduled for delivery to SMFI this year.

Sourced from PIC’s genetic nucleus in Saskatchewan, Canada, the animals went through rigid quarantine and health control procedures that prepared them for the 7,000-mile journey. Upon arrival at Manila, 14 trucks queued up to receive the crates by forklift, with the PIC and SMFI teams refilling the drinkers and feeding ice cubes into the crates. 13 of the trucks then headed off to SMFI’s farm in Tagkawayan, Quezon, while one truck took 50 breeders destined for Cecilia Stock Farms, a PIC nucleus unit, to an air cargo charter for a flight to Davao in the southern island of Minadanao.

Dr Gizelle Guzman, PIC Quality Assurance and Genetic Dissemination Manager, explains, “Permits have been secured months before, and strict bio-security measures were taken to ensure that the planes, the trucks, the people involved, and the receiving farms will not pose any risk to the health of the animals. We had to make sure that the PIC genetics were in optimum condition for them to achieve their maximum potential.”

The newly imported stocks have undergone one month of acclimatization, and blood collections have been processed for serological testing. The prescribed one-month quarantine was also recently lifted by the Bureau of Animal Industry’s provincial vets. Further, these animals will be part of the global network of millions of PIC genetics recorded on PICtraq™, the industry’s largest genetic database where PIC stores performance information 24 hours a day from nucleus and multiplier farms on every continent. PICtraq™ links the genomic, performance and pedigree information of all ancestors and relatives, including the global movement of genetics.

The second Boeing 747 of PIC genetics will complete the stocking of the first phase of the new SMFI unit and play a major role in driving SMFI’s long term expansion plans. These importations strengthen both companies’ partnership and commitment to total farm-to-fork quality, and highlight their leadership positions in the pork industry since the first importation in 1994. SMFI, a subsidiary of San Miguel Purefoods, Co. is the largest pork producer and quality meat retailer in the Philippines with its renowned Monterey Meatshop brand while PIC, a subsidiary of UK-listed Genus PLC, is the world’s leading swine genetics supplier serving producers in 30 countries for 50 years.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on April 29, 2012, 08:47:27 AM
Friday, April 27, 2012
Hog Raisers Decry Being Used as ‘Bargaining Chips’
PHILIPPINES - Hog raisers are objecting to the government’s move to use pork import tariffs as a “bargaining chip” in international negotiations to extend the Philippines’ quantitative restrictions on rice imports.


GMA News reports that the National Federation of Hog Farmers Inc. (NFHFI) made the stance as Representative Teddy Casiño–chairman of the House committee on small business and enterprise development–warned of the adverse impact of rising pork imports on the local livestock industry.

"We appeal to (Agriculture) Secretary (Proceso) Alcala not to sacrifice our livelihood in favor of extending the protection on rice," said NFHFI spokesperson and Abono party-list chairman Rosendo So.

The swine raisers’ group and the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines want the Department of Agriculture to restore the tariff on pork offal to 40 per cent, but the NFHFI claims the DA had offered to cut the tariff to 5 per cent.

Mr So said the DA offered the 5-per cent pork tariff during international trade talks to extend the QR on rice until 2017.

Hog farms said a 40-per cent rate would discourage pork smuggling.

National Food Authority administrator Angelito Banayo said China, Viet Nam, Pakistan and India are “most keen” on negotiating with the Philippines on rice QRs.

Mr Banayo added that the United States, Canada, Australia, Thailand and El Salvador also intend to meet with Filipino negotiators on the rice QRs.

Seventy per cent of the country’s pork imports come from the US and Canada, Mr So noted.

The US has deplored the differing food safety and handling standards the DA has for freshly slaughtered meats.

The DA standards for fresh meat are contained in Administrative Order No. 5, while frozen meats–usually and including imported pork–are covered by AO No. 6.

"This system imposes very high standards on the handling of frozen meat, which is primarily imported, that do not apply to the handling of freshly slaughtered meat, which is exclusively domestic," the US Trade Representative said in its third annual Report on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures.

Agriculture Assistant Secretary Davinio Catbagan said in a phone interview with GMA News Online that freshly slaughtered meat and frozen meats are “different products” requiring different food safety and handling standards.

Mr Catbagan also said the DA remains open to consultations with hog raisers even though AO 5 and AO 6 have been in effect since early April.

Rep. Casiño claimed in a statement emailed to GMA News Online that “AO 5 and AO 6 did not go through a public consultation.”

Mr Casiño also alleged that the Aquino administration is favoring imported meats over local output.

He said imported pork in 2008 was 109.36 million kgs, which increased by 48.32 percent in 2011 to 162.21 million kgs.

“Based on our consultation with local hog and poultry raisers, farm gate prices from July 2011 to February 2012 averaged P86 per kilo against production cost of P92 per kilo,” the Bayan Muna party-list solon said.

“An estimated P8.5 billion was lost in the eight month-period, with 2.2 million hogs sold each month. With this they are operating at a loss due to the unfair advantage of imported meat,” he added.

Mr Casiño said the DA “should at least hold a dialogue with local hog and poultry raisers to address their concerns affecting the local industry and the consuming public.”

However, Mr Catbagan said there were in fact five consultations held in Davao, Cebu and Metro Manila in 2011 and that the draft orders were published before they took effect.

“We’re not closing our doors,” Mr Catbagan said even as he revealed that efforts are underway to schedule new meetings with stakeholders so their views may be heard.

The DA had earlier revealed that its National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS) will put up a two triple-A service abattoir or slaughterhouse in Luzon this year.

Next year, NMIS will have a triple-A service slaughterhouse in Mindanao and a triple-A service poultry dressing plant in Luzon, to be followed in 2014 by a triple-A service slaughterhouse will be funded in Visayas.

The DA said these new slaughterhouses pave the way to replacing 20 per cent of annual meat imports with locally produced meat and meat products.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 01, 2012, 09:36:23 AM
Monday, April 30, 2012
Public Warned Against Imported Chicken, Pork
PHILIPPINES - The National Meat Inspection Service has warned the public against possible spoilage in some chicken meat and pork brought in from abroad.


NMIS head Jane Bacayo cited reports that some of the meat may not have been handled properly while being brought to the Philippines, radio dzBB's Allan Gatus reported.

Ms Bacayo was also quoted as saying in the report the meat may be vulnerable to spoilage if it is not properly stored, especially under the summer heat, according to GMANews.

He also said they are verifying reports of contamination in meat brought in from countries like France, the United States, Canada, and European Union.

Ms Bacayo said the NMIS will continue monitoring reports of contamination of imported meat.

The NMIS' warning came amid hog and poultry raisers' complaint that the government is not acting on meat smuggling.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 08, 2012, 09:11:22 AM
Friday, May 04, 2012
Hog, Poultry Raisers Mull Holiday over Smuggling
PHILIPPINES - Leaders of various organisations of hog and poultry raisers nationwide threatened to impose a five-day pork and chicken holiday anew if technical smuggling is not stopped.


The leaders are AGAP party-list Rep. Nicanor Briones; ABONO party-list chairman Rosendo So; Edwin G. Chen, president, Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines, Inc.; Daniel Javellana Jr., chairman, National Federation of Hog Farmers, Inc.; Gregorio San Diego Jr., president, United Broilers Raisers Association; and Ernesto Ordonez, chairman, Alyansa Agrikultura.

All of them concurred on stating that the biggest problem they encounter is smuggling, if not solved, would worsen poverty situation in the country, reports DailyStar.

Mr Briones said Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala has ordered for a review of the DA's Administrative Order no. 5, which hog raisers have criticized as favoring meat importers.

Mr Alcala also ordered a stop to accrediting new importers and a review of the existing list for purging.

An estimated P8.5 billion was lost from July 2011 to February 2012, with 2.2 million hogs sold each month.

Technical smuggling also caused the government to lose some P3.7 billion in revenues annually.

Mr Briones said the Bureau of Customs also assured the industry that it will implement a 100 per cent inspection of imported meat.

He also lauded the government for allotting one representative from the industry to participate in the inspection.

So, meanwhile, said although they welcomed this development the industry had not dropped its threat to go on a five-day pork and chicken holiday again until the government had totally stopped the unhampered technical smuggling.

“It this actually a sacrifice for the backyard hog raisers not to sell their products and lose income for five days, but the effect of this is significant, something that we are hoping for to achieve – that they (government) would look into our plight,” he said.

On the other hand, Mr Chen said the list of meat importers must be purged because there are more illegal importers that the legitimate ones.

The stakeholders, showing a basis for their claim of increasing illegal pork importation, cited a report which shows that it has steadily increased from 109,366,006 kilos in 2011; the highest was registered in 2010 at 178,905,096 kilos.

"Until we see the government level playing field, we cannot be complacent. We want smuggling completely eradicated," Ms So said.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on May 08, 2012, 04:01:44 PM
Let's get started...umpisahan na yang pork holiday nang magkaalaman na. :o
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: allen0469 on May 08, 2012, 05:42:57 PM
kaibigan,
last week nag pork holiday kami 5 of my friends,ibig sabihin ikaw hindi sumali,baka wala na yatang hog holiday kasi bigyan daw ng attention ni sec.alcala at nasibak na raw ang ilang officials na involve NOT sure.haa.. kong totoo ba pina talsik na baka pinahinga lang muna para walang masilip ang press at ang hog people...
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on May 09, 2012, 09:36:58 AM
Nope. I didn't sell my hogs since last month pa.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on May 09, 2012, 09:40:03 AM
DTI to convene nat’l price council
for commodities’ rates monitoring

 
MANILA – The Department of Trade and Industry will convene the National Price Coordinating Council within the week to ensure a steady supply of meat, rice and sugar in the market in light of the planned “meat holiday” by hog raisers.

Trade and Industry Undersecretary Zenaida Maglaya said the NPCC would meet this week to confirm inventory, production volume and prices of these basic commodities.

Maglaya said that prices of pork had remained stable at P170 to P180 per kilo but if the hog raisers would make good of its threat to declare a “meat holiday,” the government should be ready because it would take between 6 and 8 months to grow a pig before harvest.

Hog raisers have announced plans to hold a meat holiday to protest the alleged inaction from the Bureau of Customs on the entry of cheap imported meat, such as pork and chicken.

Prices of chicken have already gone up by P10 per kilo to a high of P30 from P110 and P120 per kilo but not because of the impact of meat holiday but because of the warm weather that had slowed down production.

The NPCC is also making an inventory of rice stocks because the lean season for rice starts from July to September.

“We want to have a confirmation that we have sufficient buffer for the lean season,” Maglaya said.

The price of sugar has gone up by P1 per kilo to P45 from P44, which had been the price for a long time.

Maglaya said that the Bureau of Fisheries would be represented in the meeting because prices of “tamban”, the fish use in sardines, have remained at P25 per kilo even after the ban on fishing “tamban” was lifted last March 1. Before the ban, price of “tamban” was at P22 per kilo.

The DTI had agreed to raise the prices of canned sardines by P1 per can when prices of “tamban” went up to P27 from P22 in late 2010 when the ban of fishing “tamban” was imposed.

With the lifting of the ban, the DTI also expected that prices of canned sardines would be rolled back by P1 per can. Prevailing prices of canned sardines are at P13.50 although a few are selling at P14.

Apparently, the prices of canned sardines remained high because the prices of “tamban” remained at P27 per kilo even after the lifting of the ban.

“If the price of fish goes back to P22 per kilo, then we expect a P1 rollback in prices of canned sardines,” Maglaya said. Prices of “galunggong” have gone down to P110 from P120 per kilo.

Prices of other agricultural products like vegetables, except for carrots, have remained stable or even at lower prices.

 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: allen0469 on May 10, 2012, 11:18:32 AM

Nope. I didn't sell my hogs since last month pa.




good to hear na since last month pa piro ask lang kaya mo na walang bintahan or nag stop ka ng operation mo?

as i read sa news last day parang pakiramdam ko sa sinabi ni sec alcala na mag flush flood pa yata ang frozen meat pag matuloy ang meat holiday kasi parang proud pa nya na mag ma open ang gate ng imported meat dahil sa meat holiday my malaking dahilan naman sila na mag approve ng imported meat kaya parang hindi maganda ang mangyayari or spy war lang ang gagawin nya as of now walang counter news ang hog raisers sa comment ni sec alcala.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 12, 2012, 10:20:33 AM
Friday, May 11, 2012
Pork & Chicken Producers Assure Steady Supply
PHILIPPINES - The hog and chicken raisers said that there is no shortage in the supply of pork meat, saying even the Department of Agriculture and Palace earlier claimed that there is enough supply of pigs and chicken for local markets.


According to The Manila Times.net, Rosendo So, chairman of Abono party-land convenor of the Swine Development Council also belied allegation that the sector is out to blackmail the government for threatening to hold a five-day pork holiday if it does not make good of its commitment to address the problem of rampant smuggling of meat.

Hog and chicken producers also lashed back at “unnamed” leaders of the Alliance of Food Processors for accusing them of economic sabotage.

The group in a statement said that the illegal importation of misdeclared meat is threatening the livelihood of backyard farmers and agricultural workers in allied trades.

“We want to protect the interest and survival of the local hog and poultry industries which are facing extinction (because of) unabated smuggling of pork and chicken by unscrupulous importers,” said Mr So.

“We implore the government to go after unscrupulous importers who are engaged in technical smuggling. We are neither blackmailing the government nor are we engaged in economic sabotage,” he added.

So also said that it is the crooked importers, in connivance with the corrupt customs and agriculture personnel, who are the ones sabotaging the economy because they do not only deprive the government of billions of pesos in revenues, but they also causing the collapse of the local growers, including the allied industries.

“Accusing us of engaging in economic sabotage is not only unfair but uncalled for. We just want to protect the local industries from unfair trade practices of unscrupulous meat importers. They are the real economic saboteurs,” he said.

So also noted that the government has been losing P3.7 billion in annual revenues due to technical smuggling of pork and chicken where unscrupulous importers misdeclare their importations to avoid paying higher tariff of 40 per cent.

“The illegal importation have killed 20 per cent of the P25-billion backyard industry and not paying the proper tariff to the government,” So pointed out.

On his part, Customs Commissioner Ruffy Biazon said that the bureau has now on alert status over the importations of frozen food.

Mr Biazon, who attended the recently concluded Hog Raisers Convention in Cebu City, assured the bureau’s all out efforts to curb frozen food smuggling, particularly meat.

He said that all BOC operating units will closely monitor and/or conduct full examination on all frozen food importations, even as he also ordered a review of the records of the country’s past frozen meat importations.

“We are now going through the past records of importations of the country’s top ten food importers to check whether all their importations were covered with the required import permits from the Department of Agriculture [DA], or whether these importers did not import beyond the approved volume granted to them by the DA,” Mr Biazon said.

Biazon said that he is not discounting the possibility of connivance among customs officials, officers of other agencies involved in the regulation of the country’s meat importation and importers.

Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on May 21, 2012, 07:25:42 PM

Hog raisers assure enough pork supply
By Louella D. Desiderio (The Philippine Star) Updated May 11, 2012 12:00 AMComments (0)

 







MANILA, Philippines - Hog raisers assure that there is adequate supply of pork in the market despite earlier statements made by food processors that a planned pork holiday is being used to mask a short supply situation.
 
“There is no shortage of pork in the market,” Rosendo So, spokesperson of the Swine Development Council said in a telephone interview yesterday.
 
Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala said in a press conference yesterday there is enough supply of pork at the moment.
 
“There is no reason for price movement,” he added.
 
Francisco Buencamino, executive director of the Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc. said in a press conference on Monday that they have received reports from dealers that pigs being sold in the market are undersized and that the short supply could still worsen because of an outbreak of pig diarrhea in the provinces of Pampanga, Bulacan and Batangas.
 
Buencamino also said the planned pork holiday is probably being used by the hog raisers so as not to reveal the short supply situation in the market.
 
So said the hog raisers were planning to hold another pork holiday to send the message that the industry is losing from the continued entry of misdeclared meat imports into the country.
 
He said in a statement yesterday that aside from threatening the survival of the local hog industry, the entry of misdeclared meat imports is likewise preventing government from collecting revenues.
 



He noted that the government has been losing P3.7 billion in annual revenues due to technical smuggling of pork and chicken where unscrupulous importers misdeclare their importations to avoid paying higher tariff of 40 percent.
 
“We want to protect the interest and survival of the local hog and poultry industries which are facing extinction due to unabated smuggling of pork and chicken by unscrupulous importers,” he said.
 
Imports of choice cuts of meat are entering the country by being declared as offals which are subject to a lower five-percent tariff.
 
He said the hog raisers are not against importations of meat but just want the government to go after importers involved in the smuggling of meat in the country.
 
Hog raisers launched a pig holiday late last month to press the government to act on unabated smuggling.
 
Hog raisers earlier called on the Department of Agriculture to remove National Meat Inspection Service executive director Jane Bacayo and Bureau of Animal Industry director Efren Nuestro from their respective posts, as they claimed that rampant smuggling has continued to hurt the industry.
 
Despite Bacayo’s resignation and Nuestro’s filing of leave of absence last week, hog raisers said they may still launch a five-day pork holiday if the Bureau of Customs (BoC) would not act immediately and implement measures to stop the smuggling of meat.
 
So said the decision to pursue the planned pork holiday would depend on the actions to be taken by the BoC.
 
In particular, he said, hog raisers want the BoC to implement a 100-percent inspection of offal imports in the bureau’s area, as part of efforts to address smuggling instead of conducting the inspection in cold storage facilities.
 
For his part, Edwin Chen president of the Pork Producers Federation of the Philippines, Inc. said the government must also purge the list of meat importers of dummy corporations.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 25, 2012, 09:33:27 AM

TOPIGS Philippines & QJJ Group Build Top Genetics Base
23 May 2012

 
PHILIPPINES - TOPIGS Philippines chartered 1164 GGP and GP pig breeders for QJJ Farm located in the main pig producing province of Luzon. The animals are currently under strict quarantine and adaptation procedures in the newly constructed modern facility of QJJ Farm.

 

Dr Bryan M. Retales (General Manager of TOPIGS Philippines) and Ms Alice L. Guo (Head of Farm Operations of QJJ Group) during the unloading of the animals.

 

Full charter of 1164 animals with Cathay Pacific Cargo Boeing 747 from North America that arrived at Diosdado Macapagal International Airport (Clark Airport), Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines

 

QJJ Group and TOPIGS Philippines bannering the arrival of the imported top breeding animals
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 28, 2012, 02:01:29 AM

87M Kg of Pork Smuggled in 2011 into Philippines
25 May 2012


PHILIPPINES - As much as 87 million kilograms of pork have been smuggled into the country last year alone and the illegal meat entry continues, according to the head of a local hog industry group.

According to Inquirer News, Rosendo So, head of the Swine Development Council, said this should prompt President Aquino to finally put a stop to smuggling which is killing the Philippine hog industry.
 
Mr So, quoting reports from the Bureau of Customs (BOC), said that of at least 102 million kg of offal imported in 2011 at least 87 million kg “illegally entered the country and flooded wet markets last year.”
 
“The syndicated smuggling operations of these unscrupulous importers and corrupt BOC and Department of Agriculture personnel are not only killing local industries, but is also depriving the government billions of pesos in revenues,” said Mr So, who is also chair and representative of the party-list group Abono, said in a statement.
 
He said a “top to bottom revamp” of the customs bureau and agriculture department is needed because the smuggling syndicates “could not have done this without the connivance of BOC and DA personnel.”
 
Mr So said the National Meat Inspection Service’s list of 142 meat importers showed that only 29 are processors and two are “integrators.” Processors and integrators are the only companies allowed to import offal, he said.
 
Offal refers to a butchered animal’s innards, skin and other leftover parts used as extenders in processed meat products.
 
“Where did the 87 million kg of offal go when we did not see offal flooding the wet markets? It looked like they magically turned into prime cuts of pork and were passed off as fresh meat that flooded the market,” Mr So said.
 
He said some importers misdeclared the prime cuts of meat as offal to avoid paying the right tariff, depriving the government of revenues. He said misdeclaration and undervaluation deprive the government of some P3.7 billion in revenues yearly.
 
“We demand that those responsible for this crisis be held accountable,” he said.
 
“We call on President Aquino to declare an all-out war against smugglers,” he said
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on August 26, 2012, 07:58:02 AM

Foremost Farms Partners with Hypor to Improve on Lean Quality Pork
24 August 2012

 

PHILIPPINES - Foremost Farms Inc, one of Southeast Asia’s largest hog-raising facilities, has decided to start working with Hypor Maxter genes to improve the quality of finishing pigs. The objective is producing safe and lean quality pork for the Philippine market.

Hypor Maxter is a Piétrain terminal sire that maximises growth in finishing pigs in combination with the right meat and carcase quality characteristics.
 
Especially within the Piétrain range Hypor Maxter progeny exhibit exceptional growing potential, without compromising on lean yield and loin depth. This boar has undoubtedly the perfect performance and is recognised throughout the industry for the following characteristics:
 •Fastest Growing Piétrain
•Excellent Feed Conversion
•High Lean Carcases
•Strong Progeny
•Hal Negative

To get the most out of the genetic potential, technical specialists of Hypor will support Foremost Farms staff. Sharing ideas and expertise in combination with the best genetics is key to success. Foremost Farms will benefit from the cost and production efficiencies in using Hypor genetics, as its pigs are bred to increase profitability in the total pork value chain.
 
Ms Sharon Tan, Chief Operating Officer Foremost Farms: "We decided to import Hypor Maxter boars from France based on the excellent support and production performance that Hypor breeding animals deliver. With Hypor genetics, our customers will have safe and lean quality pork at the lowest costs per kg of produced meat."
 
Dr Evaristo U. Macalino, Area Manager Asia: "This partnership fits the Hypor strategy: expanding our global breeding network with strong local partners that deliver top quality and support the markets' profitability."
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Tinkerbell on September 23, 2012, 07:47:10 PM

19th International Agribusiness Exhibition and Seminars
13th International Food Processing, Packaging and Products Exhibition
8th National Fisheries Exhibition and Seminars
Trade Fair Dates: October 4-6, 2012

Venue: World Trade Center Metro Manila (WTCMM), Roxas Blvd., Pasay City, Philippines

Important Dates:

Ingress: October 3, 2012 - 8am to 10pm
Exhibition Dates: October 4-6, 2012 - 10am to 6pm
Egress: October 6, 2012 - 6pm to 10pm

Dress Code: Business Attire
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on October 14, 2012, 08:55:28 AM

Government Further Strengthens Agri-Fishery Education
11 October 2012

PHILIPPINES - The Department of Agriculture (DA) and the Department of Education (DepEd) will jointly explore ways to improve the delivery of agriculture and fishery offerings in 126 agri-fishery technical vocational schools.

This collaboration aims to further strengthen DepEd’s current offerings and provide students more options to earn a living when they graduate.
 
In a previously signed memorandum of understanding between Education Secretary Armin A. Luistro and Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala, the two parties have agreed to co-share resources so that tech-voc schools can better serve students who choose agriculture and fishery as their preferred livelihood, a Dep Ed statement said.
 
Luistro said the MOU is aligned with the K to 12 Basic Education Programme in which one of the objectives is to develop the skills of students in technical and vocational education.
 
As agreed, the DA will extend technical assistance and know-how by providing resource persons in training tech-voc teachers in agriculture and fishery education.
 
DA will likewise provide seedlings, fingerlings, fertiliser and other production inputs for the development of demonstration farms, nurseries and breeding stations.
 
The agriculture department has also agreed to offer scholarship grants to deserving graduating high school students as well as master’s degree programmes for tech-voc teachers and officials on agriculture specific and fishery-oriented courses in University of the Philippines Los Baños, Mindanao State University and Central Luzon State University, among others.
 
The MOU will be effective for two years and subject to renewal based on the positive outcome of the joint agreement.
 
DepEd’s Strengthened Technical Vocational Education Programme aims to equip high school graduates with TESDA-certifiable tech-voc skills that would allow them to venture into self-starting businesses. It is a priority programme of the Aquino government to better link schooling to community and local industry needs and therefore address unemployment and job mismatch.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 10, 2013, 09:32:02 AM

Efficient Pig Climate Control Systems for Philippine Sow Farm
09 January 2013

 

PHILIPPINES - The Northern Philippines experience very hot temperatures and pounding typhoons each year – not ideal conditions for raising pigs.

Venvi Agro’s 2,400 sow farm in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte Province, however, has managed to get around nature by putting their animals in environmentally controlled houses and has begun to reap awards. The pig climate control systems for one of the most modern farms in the country have been supplied by Big Dutchman.
 
Venvi Agro’s remarkable performance, noted PIC manager Dr. Adrian Carlos, can be attributed largely to the type of housing in the farm. “We are really seeing good numbers here and the main reason for that is the climate controlled housing”, he said. “All our multiplier units are using the same genetics and the same nutrition, and many of our other units are performing very well. However, with Venvi Agro’s tunnel ventilated housing, the pigs have really been able to express their genetic potential.”
 



Venvi Agri’s sow farm has performed beyond expectations. Modern systems for pig climate control play an important role.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on February 05, 2013, 12:00:16 AM

Farmers Trained on Organic Swine Production
04 February 2013

PHILIPPINES - Thirty-two farmers from different organisations in the municipality of Hingyon underwent training on organic swine management and fermented feeds preparation at the Bahawit Nursery and Training Center here provided by the Provincial Veterinary Office (PVET).

According to Ferdinand Dunuan of PVET, the training seminar was sponsored by board member Gerry Luglug who facilitated the funding of the swine-raising project of the farmers; he also made a ceremonial awarding of two piglets each to the farmer beneficiaries.
 
Luglug said the training is necessary to ensure that the livelihood project will be successful and truly help them increase their income through organic swine management by feeding the pigs with home-prepared fermented feeds instead of commercial feeds.
 
He added that the livestock project of the different people’s organization members was carefully identified as a means to augment the economic well-being of the farmers and as an alternative source of their livelihood.
 
PVET Senior Agriculturist Gilbert Caclini lectured and made actual demonstration on the procedure and the ingredients of making fermented feeds in their homes for organic swine production which he said is very much cheaper than commercial feeds.
 
He showed to the farmers the cost of the ingredients for 50 kilograms fermented feeds which is P460 as compared to a 50 kilogram commercial feed costing P1,380 or a difference of P980 which they can save if they themselves prepared the fermented feeds for their pigs.
 
Benjie Lunag of the Provincial Agriculture Office also lectured on organic vegetable farming for the farmers to adopt as a means of also earning additional income while PVET agriculturist Antonio Taguilingon presented the Animal Loan Contract (ALC) for the dispersal of the piglets.
 
The seminar ended with the signing of the ALC by the farmers who thanked the PVET for the skills and knowledge they learned on organic feed preparation and organic swine production.(JDP/DBC-PIA CAR, Ifugao)
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on February 14, 2013, 03:31:20 AM

ACMC: Expanding in the Philippines
09 February 2013
 
PHILIPPINES - International pig-breeding company, ACMC, is expanding its Philippines operation with the appointment of a new franchisee breeder on the island of Luzon.

 

Yorkshire-bred pigmeat being sold in one of Mr Boni Ong's butcher's shops in the Philippines.

 

Mr Boni Ong and his wife, Maritess (right) with their meat operations supervisor, Floro, in one of their thriving Philippines retail outlets.
 
Farmer and butcher Mr Boni Ong is setting up a nucleus and multiplier unit through his company McQuarry Farms in Nueva Ecija province with 200 GGP and GP Meidam females. Besides producing their own hybrid AC1 breeding gilts there will be surplus for sale to other commercial farmers.
 
The high-health foundation stock is being supplied from ACMC’s existing Philippine operation — ACMC Phils — on the remote island of Bantayan, which will also be supplying boars and semen.
 
Boni Ong operates two slaughterhouses and has four retail butcher’s shops near to the Metro Manila region. These sell the meat from 50 per cent of the finished pigs he produces, the carcases weighing 75-80 kg. His large-scale farming enterprise includes two commercial farms which already produce several thousand slaughter pigs a year.
 
He is expanding because he slaughters all the pigs he finishes and, at times, even has to procure additional pigs to satisfy his retail requirements as well as fulfilling his other meat supply agreements.
 
"When his existing breeding-stock contract ended, he chose ACMC stock on the basis of their breed qualities, including litter size, robustness and ease of management as well as meat quality in the slaughter generation as shown by recent Filipino carcase quality studies," commented Dr Danny Silbor, managing director of ACMC Phils.
 
McQuarry Farms will be linked to ACMC’s Yorkshire headquarters in the UK through PigCom, the company’s pig data and management system and GEP (genetic evaluation program).
 
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on March 11, 2013, 10:58:20 AM

Hog Raisers Attend Marketing Lectures
08 March 2013

PHILIPPINES - Two hundred-twenty members of the Association of Hog Raisers of Negros Occidental attended the First District Hog Raisers Assembly held at Balay Kauswagan in Sagay City recently.

The participants came from the cities of Escalante and San Carlos and the municipalities of Toboso, Don Salvador Benedicto and Calatrava. They listened to lectures on swine marketing and went on an exposure trip to Triple A Slaughterhouse in Sagay City.
 
In a press statement, Negros Occidental Governor Alfredo G. Marañon Jr. lauded the organizers of the assembly for their efforts in diversification. He also assured the organizers of more support from the provincial government to further improve the swine industry in the province.
 
Negros Occidental contributes almost 50 per cent to the country’s total sugar production and is 95 per cent rice sufficient. Hog raising is a vital part in the provincial government’s thrusts for food security and agricultural productivity program because it provides employment opportunities and sustainable livelihood to residents.
 
Meanwhile, project beneficiaries under the Provincial Veterinary Office’s Provincial Animal Genetic Improvement Program on Swine were also given certificates of ownership.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on April 27, 2013, 07:55:19 AM

Philippines Government to Improve Hog Sector Competitiveness
25 April 2013

PHILIPPINES - The Philippines government aims to makes it country's hog sector more competitive globally.

Agriculture Secretary Proceso J. Alcala joined with swine industry leaders during the 22nd Hog Convention and Trade Exhibits, at Manila Jockey Club, in Carmona, Cavite.
 
Mr Alcala said the Department of Agriculture will continuously provide needed interventions and implement policies that will make the country’s hog industry globally competitive, thus ensuring its continued growth.
 
Last year, the hog industry grew by 1.7 per cent, valued at P174.5 billion at current prices.
 
It is the country’s second leading sub-sector behind palay (paddy rice).
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on January 29, 2014, 08:35:54 AM

Filipino Agriculture Sector up in 2013 Despite Typhoons
28 January 2014

PHILIPPINES - With poultry, palay, and a host of other key subsectors posting healthy growth rates, agriculture in the Philippines managed to expand by a respectable 1.15 per cent from January to December last year, notwithstanding the series of natural catastrophes that hit the country during the period.

The Bureau of the Agricultural Statistics also reported that the industry grew by 3.5 per cent, to P1.5 trillion at current prices, in terms of value.

“Considering a very challenging year, this growth is significant,” Secretary of Agriculture Proceso J. Alcala said. “It also reminds us how weather-dependent agriculture is, and therefore the need to promote and support diversification and value-adding in food processing is stronger than ever before.”

Poultry growers produced 4.2 per cent more in 2013 than the previous year, largely due to the uptick in the production of chicken buoyed by the increased demand for roasted chicken in key urban centers nationwide. Chicken output expanded by 5.01 per cent, from 1.47 million tons, to 1.55 million tons.

Livestock raisers likewise improved their output last year, as production increased by 1.75 per cent led by dairy (5.47 per cent), followed by hog (1.95 per cent) and cattle (1.76 per cent). Collectively, livestock and poultry subsectors accounted for 31 per cent of the total agricultural production, with a combined gross value of P407.4 billion at current prices.

Palay farmers also came up with another record-breaking harvest, at 18.44 million tons, which is 2.26 per cent higher than last year’s output of 18.03 million tons. The report mainly attributed the growth to the expansion in area harvested and improvement in yield through the use of quality seeds in Central Luzon, Caraga, SOCCSKSARGEN, Bicol Region and ARMM. Lower incidence of pests and diseases also contributed to the increase in gross output, the BAS report said. Last year’s palay production was 8.08 per cent bigger than in 2011, at 16.68 million tons.

Overall, the crops subsector to which palay belongs expanded by a modest 0.09 per cent and accounted for more than half (51.04 per cent) of the total agricultural output.

Fish capture and aquaculture farmers also had bigger output in 2013, allowing the fisheries industry to negate its weak output in the previous year.

The combined harvests of commercial, municipal and aquaculture farmers increased by 1.23 per cent, from P138.0 billion to P139.7 billion constant prices, boosted by roundscad production which grew by 17.03 per cent, followed by milkfish (3.7 per cent), tilapia (3.18 per cent) and tiger prawn (2.59 per cent).

In terms of value at current prices, fisheries expanded by 2.78 per cent, from P232.6 to P239.08 billion. Fisheries, with a gross value of P239.1 billion at current prices, shared nearly one-fifth (17.96 per cent), to the total output.

In all, these expansions effectively cushioned the impact of the reduced harvests of other commodities as a result of typhoons that hit the country, among other factors.

Corn farmers saw their output slightly decline by 0.40 per cent, to 7.37 million tons, from 7.4 million tons in 2012, due to damages inflicted by typhoon Gorio on corn farms in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao in the second quarter, and typhoon Yolanda that hit Visayas before the year-end.

Lower output was noted among growers of coconut, sugarcane, banana, coffee, abaca, peanut and calamansi.

Harvest of seaweed farmers also contracted as Typhoons “Wilma”, “Yolanda” and “Zorayda” destroyed several farms in Palawan, while incidence of ice-ice” disease persisted in Palawan, Bohol, Zamboanga Sibugay, Zamboanga del Norte and Tawi-tawi.

BAS said seaweed production in 2013 only reached 1.55 million tons, representing an 11-per cent decrease from 2012 output of 1.75 million tons.

On the average, farmers earned higher from their hardwork last year as farmgate prices went up by 2.3 per cent during the period, bolstered by higher demand for certain farm and fishery products.

Livestock recorded the highest farmgate price gain (at 6.94 per cent), followed by crops (2.04 per cent), fisheries (1.53 per cent) and poultry (0.10 per cent).

The year 2013 has been marked by destructive typhoons that affected key food production areas around the country, the strongest being Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan) that slammed Eastern and Western Visayas. These areas are major producers of high value crops such as coconut, rice and abaca. In October, Typhoon Santi (Nari) slammed Northern and Central Luzon in October, destroying tons of palay and other crops in its path.

Other devastating storms that hit the country last year were Labuyo, Odette and Vinta.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on April 12, 2014, 01:19:30 PM
News


Ramon Jimenez Appointed New Manager of TOPIGS Philippines
07 April 2014




PHILIPPINES - TOPIGS is pleased to announce the appointment of Ramon Jimenez as General Manager of TOPIGS Philippines with effect from 12 February 2014.

Mr Jimenez (44) has broad experience in the pig industry in Philippines. Over the past 21 years he has held various positions working for an international company in sales, business development and management.

Ramon is enthusiastic about his new position: "TOPIGS is a world leading innovating genetic company that has a keen eye for their customers needs and builds business partnerships. A perfect combination. I am proud to become part of this and hope that I can bring substantial value creation for our customers.’’

TOPIGS Philippines is the leading supplier of swine genetics in the Philippines and operates from the head office in Manila.

TOPIGS is one of the biggest genetics suppliers in the world. In several countries, TOPIGS is either the market leader or one of the major suppliers.

TOPIGS stands for progress in pigs. This means research, innovation and genetic improvement are the cornerstones of our company. By continuously improving our products, we enable our clients to achieve maximum results.
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on May 17, 2014, 09:53:02 AM

Philippine Agri-fishery Performance up in Terms of Value
16 May 2014

PHILIPPINES - Philippine agriculture grossed P386.6 billion at current prices in the first quarter of the year- or up by 10.75 per cent -- from the same period last year, disproving forecast that last year’s typhoons would drag down farm sector performance, the Department of Agriculture said in a statement.

While the growth translated to a 0.67 per cent expansion in output, farmers and fishers, however, reaped higher profits for their work as farm gate prices increased by an average of 10.01 per cent during the period.

A Philippine Statistical Authority report said that almost all crops have registered an increase in production, with rice increasing by a respectable 3.28per cent, or 4.3 million MT from the 4.17 million MT during the same period last year.

Paddy output would have been bigger if not for the three typhoons – Santi, Vinta and Yolanda – which barrelled through rice producing areas near the end of last year.

Despite these calamities, rice production surged as a result of planting area expansion, improved irrigation services, and the provision of certified and hybrid seeds.

A replanting scheme in typhoon-hit areas, which saw government rushing production inputs, resulted in the quick turnaround of ruined farmlands.

Corn farmers likewise produced more during the period, turning out 2.3 million MT which is 1.33 per cent bigger than a year ago. This was mainly due to the expansion of planting areas in the ARMM, Northern Mindanao, SOCCSKSARGEN and Davao regions.

However, the report cited that it was vegetable growers that generated the highest growth, a staggering 91.8per cent with production support from government like quality seeds and a financial assistance like the novel Plant Now, Pay Later scheme in Nueva Vizcaya nearly doubled yields.

Other gainers in the crops subsector include: sugarcane (5.54 per cent); banana (1.86 per cent); pineapple (5.75 per cent); tobacco (4.46 per cent); monggo (2.61 per cent); cassava (11.29 per cent); and tomato (3.51 per cent).

As predicted, coconut output dipped by 6.1 per cent, but still below that what was projected, due to typhoon Yolanda’s mowing down of vast swaths of plantations in Eastern and Western Visayas, Quezon, Masbate, Romblon and Surigao del Norte.

Lower harvests were also noted in Zamboanga del Norte due to the extreme heat during fruit development, and in Batangas, Laguna and Cavite from scale insect infestation.

The coconut sector’s rebound, however, is expected to accelerate on account of a massive salt fertilization project , which has covered 640,000 hectares as of December 2013 , and the promotion of intercropping.

To replace senile trees, Philippine Coconut Authority has also planted 26.67 million new trees from 2010 to 2013.

Coffee farmers likewise harvested less in the period due to decreased yield from aging trees and shift of farmers in Cavite to pineapple, among other factors.

Livestock subsector grew by 1.2 per cent during the quarter in review, powered by the hog producers whose output expanded by 1.25per centon the back of higher demand for pork in industrial areas of Bataan and Metro Manila.

Cattle output also inched up by 0.82, and carabao by 0.10 per cent.

Similarly, poultry was on the uptrend, growing by 1.33 per cent during the period. Growth was buoyed by higher output of chicken (2.5 per cent) and duck meat (0.10 per cent).

Collectively, municipal and commercial fishers and aquaculture farmers produced 3.25 per cent less in the first three months of the year as compared to the same period in 2013.

Milkfish harvest fell by 2.11 per cent, mainly attributed to the stoppage of several marine pen operators in Davao del Sur due to heavy siltation.

Also, several fishpond and aquaculture farm operators in Iloilo and Samar were still reeling from the damage they incurred from typhoon Yolanda.

Tilapia production also suffered a slight drop of 0.14 per cent attributed to a host of reasons, including inadequate supply of fingerlings in Pangasinan and Zamboanga Peninsula, and fish kill incidence in Taal Lake.

Tiger prawn producers also suffered reduced output, by 0.43 per cent, as high water temperature, low stocking rate and bigger operating expenses caused fewer harvests in areas such as MIMAROPA.

Roundscad harvests also shrank by almost 7 percent (6.9 per cent) as a result of fewer fishing trips due to bad weather conditions in areas such as Zamboanga Peninsula, and huge number of lost or damaged boats in Yolanda-hit areas.

The Department of Agriculture, however, expects an uptick in the catch as privately- donated and government-purchased bancas are delivered by the hundreds to fishing communities.

Other losers were yellowfin tuna (2.7 per cent); seaweed (3.86 per cent) and other species, including sardines (5.7 per cent).

Only the harvest of skipjack went up by nearly 5 percent (4.62 per cent) following more sightings of skipjack in waters off SOCCSKSARGEN where the DA-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources carried out a ban on the use of fish aggregating device.

Income of farmers and fishers were towed up by the rise in the prices of crops like palay (21.91 per cent); pineapple (21.69 per cent); abaca (14.65 per cent); garlic (213.18 per cent); coffee (4.04 per cent); and livestock and poultry (around 4 per cent).
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on August 10, 2014, 11:25:39 PM
Agri-chief urges local hog producers to prep for the ASEAN free trade


 Created on Thursday, 31 July 2014 
Agriculture Secretary Proceso J. Alcala urged local hog producers to prepare for the upcoming ASEAN free trade in 2015, stressing that an open market would offer advantageous opportunities for the Philippine local hog industry.

“Remember, ours is the only foot-and-mouth disease free country without vaccination in the Southeast Asia, and we must take advantage of that,” Alcala said during the opening program of the Philippine Swine Forum 2014, July 24 in Quezon City.

The economic integration of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations aims to create a single market economy with free movement of goods, services and investments throughout the 10-member nations of ASEAN, including the Philippines.

Aside from providing infrastructure and facilities, DA’s main concern pre-ASEAN free trade is modifying the country’s agricultural practices to match with international standards.

“Dito po nakasalalay ang ating mga gawain para sa darating na pagkakataon. Gumawa po tayo ng paraan para tayo’y makapagluwas ng ating produkto,” he said.

The country’s swine industry showed good performance in previous years because of the effective collaboration of the Department of Agriculture with the swine industry players, effecting benefits both to the hog producers and consumers.

Data from the Philippine Statistical Authority reveal that for the first quarter of 2014, livestock production went up by 1.20% accounting for 15.44% of the country’s total agricultural output for the said period. The major source of growth came from the hog industry, which expanded by 1.25%.

DA’s Livestock Development Council (DA-LDC) Executive Director Manuel Jarmin said that the swine industry has consistently dominated other livestock industries in terms of volume and value of production.

“In fact for the last three years, the swine industry contributed the most to the growth of the livestock subsector,” he added.

Dir. Jarmin said that in 2013, 2.01 million tons (liveweight) of hog valued at P 191.92 B was produced making hog commodity the 2nd (or next to palay – 19.82%) highest contributor, 13.48% of overall contribution to agriculture based on percentage distribution of value of production at constant price.

Hog inventory as of 2014 is at 11.8 million heads, 65% from backyard farms and 35% commercial, while in 2010 majority of the supply comes from backyard (77%).

“The government, thru the DA’s National Livestock Program (NLP) aims to maintain the country’s disease free status for FMD, reduce production cost and achieve cost-efficiency, self-sufficiency in pork, develop value added products for domestic and export markets, and export ventures to Asia and Middle East,” added Jarmin.

DA has allocated P1.021 B from its total budget in 2014 for major strategies under the NLP including genetic improvement (PhP 288.49 M); disease and control eradication (PhP 152.524); research, extension support and training (PhP 155.049 M); postharvest and infrastructure development (PhP 30.526 M); market development assistance and export initiatives (PhP 20.4 M); and meat safety and quality thru the National Meat Inspection Service (PhP 374.537 M). Marlo Asis, DA-AFID

Reference: Executive Director Manuel R. Jarmin
Title: Re: Philippine Hog News:
Post by: Mustang Sally Farm on October 27, 2014, 05:28:58 AM
British Pig Executive
UK - Business could be booming between Britain and the Philippines following a mission organised by BPEX and UK Trade and Industry.

Half a dozen people paid a visit to Manila and the party included traders and abattoir representatives.

Export Marketing Manager Jonathan Eckley said: “There is already some pig meat being exported but it is a growing economy and there is scope to expand that trade.

“We have been working with UKTI locally and the mission included a visit to a cold store, a cutting plant, a wet market and retailers.

“This was followed by a meet the buyer session, attended by 20 Filipino companies which included some the of the country’s leading meat importers. The business to business meetings were extremely successful.

“The aim of these meetings was to build relationships between traders and for those from the UK to meet significant players in the Philippines market.

“We had a great many inquiries so we are hopeful that will result in enhancing the trade between the UK and the Philippines. The Philippines has a population of 100 million and import about 100,000 tonnes of pig meat a year.”