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mikey

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Philippine Hog News:
« on: March 20, 2008, 08:21:17 AM »
Hog production seen rising 3.5%



Inquirer
First Posted 05:33am (Mla time) 05/25/2007


The Department of Agriculture expects hog production to grow 3.5 percent this year as meat exports to Singapore, the US, Russia, Japan and other Asian countries are likely to increase, Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said.

From 1.84 million metric tons in 2006, production is projected to reach 1.905 million metric tons this year, he said in a statement.

Aside from frozen meat, the agriculture department expects several processed meat items to start penetrating the global market this year as the Philippines moves closer to being declared totally free of foot-and-mouth disease by the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE), or Animal Health Organization.

The processed meat items include luncheon meat, pork and beans, “lechon paksiw,” pork “adobo,” “sisig,” chili con carne and “bistik tagalog.”

“Singapore is willing to accept Philippine exports of fresh frozen meat, subject to certain conditions, which are being work out,” Yap said.

He added that the Department of Agriculture was eyeing Japan, the world’s top meat importer, which imported a total of 1.32 million metric tons of meat in 2005.

He said the department would also help meat exporters break into the markets in the US, Russia, Mexico, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan and the European Union.

Yap said that every ton increase in value of hog production was equivalent to P68,750, while every ton increase in rice production, before milling, was equivalent to only P10,000.

In 2006, hog production contributed 14.26 percent of the total value of agriculture, ranking second to rice (before milling), which contributed 18 percent.

It contributed about 39 percent of the total livestock production, with gross output value pegged at P126.5 billion last year. Amy R. Remo, with INQUIRER.net


mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2008, 08:27:29 AM »
Good news,the Philippine Govt. has confidence in the hog business.With future plans to export to foreign countries.We now have Singapore,NEXT, take no prisoners.

Slyfox,you are with the Federation,is the Federation not a Special Interest Group.Special interest groups lobby Govt. for change and action.Is the Federation asking for more export opportunies?What is the long range plan for the Federation??
« Last Edit: March 20, 2008, 09:29:33 AM by mikey »


mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2008, 10:21:51 AM »
Philippine Pork Market 2008
By Pia Abuel-Ang, USDA FAS GAIN Report. The Minimum Access Volume (MAV) utilization for pork increased from five to 19 per cent last year, indicating an increase in importation of more premium pork cuts. In October 2007, the Philippine Department of Agriculture announced that it would be reviewing its MAV regulations, which is expected to be completed within the first quarter of 2008.

 

Tariff Rate Quota: Data from the Minimum Access Volume (MAV) Management Committee of the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) shows that in 2007, utilization rates of tariffrate- quotas (TRQ) or MAV for pork increased from five per cent in 2006 to 19 per cent in 2007, indicating more imports of higher-value pork cuts, such as bellies and other unspecified prime cuts.







MAV usage for pork has been relatively low, due in part to the entry of large quantities of buffalo meat with a low tariff rate of 10 per cent and illegally imported pork in the market. Buffalo meat, from India, has been traditionally used in the Philippines as a substitute for pork by the local meat processing industry. MAV utilization is expected to remain low due to the high in-quota duties for pork as well as high pork prices in the world market relative to the price of local pork. Majority of the pork imported in the Philippines is pork rind and pork fat.

WTO Commitments: Since 2005, the DA has continued to maintain 10th or final-year MAV levels under its Uruguay Round commitments. For pork HS 0203, the final-year MAV was 54,210 MT. The DA previously stated that it will continue to do so until such time as a new WTO agreement is reached. In October 2007, the DA announced that it would defer the distribution of 2008 MAV licenses, while it undertakes a review of MAV distribution guidelines. According to the DA, the review is being undertaken in order to allow new entrants and more entities to participate in the MAV system. On 17 January 2008, the DA released the MAV allocations for 2008, pending completion of the review, which temporarily disrupted trade for about 3 months. The review is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2008.

Tariff Rates: In-quota and out-of-quota tariff rates for MAV commodities have not changed since 2005. Tariff rates for pork are as follow:




1 ASEAN Free Trade Agreement-Common Effective Preferential Tariff






Imports: Last year, according to data from the Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), total pork imports increased by 43 per cent, mostly composed of pork rinds or skin and pork fats used by the meat processing industry. The Philippines imported about 32 per cent of its pork requirement from Canada and about 16 per cent from Germany. The United States supplied a little over 13 per cent (10,351 MT), mostly pork offals, fats and other unspecified pork cuts.







Production: Live hog production grew by 2.72 per cent in 2007 and 3.66 per cent in 2006. Hog production is expected to expand in 2008, albeit only marginally, due to increasing cost of feeds. In 2007, the Philippines imported 273 head of swine for breeding from the United States, an increase of 174 percent from the previous year (USDA/ERS FATUS Reports). Already in January 2008, local hog associations reported the arrival of 230 live hogs imported from the United States (see GAIN RP8003).







Consumption: Philippine population is roughly 90 million and growing at a rate of 2.36 per cent per year. According to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, annual per capita consumption of pork at 13.88 kg, grew by 1.39 per cent in 2006, while consumption of pork offal grew by 3.57 per cent.







Processed Meat: Demand for processed meat products is expected to remain strong. Canned food is very popular among Filipino households. Though canned meat/meat products had been losing popularity in recent years due to increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles, demand for such products is being awakened by more aggressive campaigns by suppliers. Due to low Philippine per capita income, demand for frozen food will remain extremely pricesensitive. Hotdogs, hams, sausages, salami and meat patties for burgers are favorite chilled processed meats among consumers.

Demand for imported processed food products will remain relatively strong given the following factors: the growing interest and preference for western style cuisine, an increasing number of dual-income families and the increasing popularity of branded processed products. Additionally, a growing segment of young consumers is demanding imported products as a growing urbanization of the Philippine population spurs this growth.

According to the Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc. (PAMPI), the domestic meat processing industry is forecast to continue to grow. The growing demand for processed meat products, which is estimated to be about 60 percent of the domestic meat market, is expected to drive this growth. Canned goods, in particular, have a strong growth potential due to wide distribution prospects in both traditional retail outlets such as supermarkets and groceries as well as remote neighborhood convenience stores or “sari-sari” stores in rural areas.

PAMPI is looking to expand into the international market. With the recognition of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) that most parts of the country are free from foot-andmouth disease, PAMPI is reportedly optimistic about the country’s potential to export more products and to become the regional production hub for processed meat products.











However, the industry’s growth and export potential are constrained by lack of new investment, an increasing global trend towards more stringent sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements for food products, and a limited source of raw materials, particularly beef, a base ingredient for most canned meat products. Because of the relatively small domestic cattle industry, local meat processors must source most of their meat requirements from outside the country such as India, and South America as well as Australia, Europe and the United States.

Foot-and-Mouth Disease: On 4 January 2008, the Philippine DA filed an application for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) free certification from the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), after having an absence of FMD outbreaks since the start of 2006. Under OIE rules, a country seeking FMD-free zone certification must have had no cases of FMD for at least 24 months before the time of application. According to the DA, an international scientific committee from the OIE will convene in March to evaluate the Philippine application, along with that of other countries. Should the Philippines’ application be favorably received by the committee, the DA expects to receive the FMD-free certification, but with vaccination, from the OIE by May 2008. After one year of attaining FMD-free status, the Philippines may once again apply for a more stringent FMD-free status, with no vaccination if no outbreaks occur. The Visayas and Mindanao islands have already been certified by the OIE as FMD-free in 2002.

The Philippines is hopeful that this certification from the OIE would pave the way for more Philippine meat exports to other countries. The DA is looking at prospective markets in Singapore and China for Philippine pork products. The Philippines is hopeful that the upcoming inspections of Philippine meat facilities by the Singapore government would result in eventual market access for local products.

Currently, the DA’s Bureau of Animal Industry restricts the movement of animals and uncooked/unprocessed meat products, including imported meat products from FMD infected countries, from Luzon to other OIE declared FMD-free zones such as Visayas or Mindanao. Imported meat products from FMD countries are only allowed to enter Luzon, provided that certain measures are in place (i.e., boneless, deglanded meat, with proper maturation and appropriate quarantine protocols, etc.). Moreover, imported meat products from FMD countries may only be imported for use by the meat processing industry and cannot be sold in the retail markets. The BAI is currently implementing a "biosecurity" program, which emphasizes the proper handling of livestock to prevent diseases, instead of vaccinating infected swine.

The Philippine DA will not likely change any policy on the movement of livestock and unprocessed animal products, even after receiving FMD-free, with vaccination certification However, should the Philippines eventually attain FMD-free status, with NO vaccination (expected by May 2009 at the earliest) the current restrictions on the movement of live animals and uncooked meat products may be reviewed, to be made consistent with policies currently implemented in Visayas and Mindanao. These possible changes may have implications on the movement of imported and domestic live animals within the country, as well as importation of meat products from FMD-countries. How these issues are eventually resolved will directly impact U.S. exports of both meat products and livestock.



mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2008, 11:39:40 AM »
Ditching Pork For Other Meats
PHILIPPINES - Consumers are shifting meat purchases from pork to chicken and goat meat, says Dr. Alice Utlang, a Cebu City veterinarian.



According to the Globalnation-Inquirer, data from the animals slaughtered at the Cebu City abattoir indicate ashift of customers away from pork.

Dr Utlang said that in the first quarter of the year, the number of slaughtered chicken reached 175,711 compared to last year's 52,908. Goat slaughtered at the abattoir also increased from January to March this year from 6,357 to 9,185.

Less hogs were slaughtered at the abattoir in the same period this year with 21,277 hogs compared to last year's 25,446 hogs.

Utlang said lechon (roasted pig) dealers told her that most of their hog suppliers shifted some of their supply to Manila, which is experiencing a scarcity of pork after hog farms in Bulacan, the biggest supplier of hogs in Metro Manila, were affected by hog cholera.




mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2008, 11:42:00 AM »
Friday, April 04, 2008Print This Page
Two Phase Livelihood Plan aims to Minimise Risk
PHILIPPINES - The Bacolod City Government Employees Multipurpose Cooperative will implement the Swine Livelihood Project in two phases, because it considers the business to be “high risk”.



BACGEM's Board of Directors decided to implement the first phase by giving the responsibility to the officers because of the risk of the animals acquiring Foot and Mouth disease, Hog Cholera virus and other related diseases.

The second phase of the project for the members was supposed to be implemented in the last quarter of 2007, but due to the Hog Cholera Virus that hit the swine industry in Luzon, the supposed series of orientation to inform its members was delayed, it added.

The release also said the swine livelihood project aims to provide income to the cooperative and individual members.

The BACGEM, which was started eleven years ago with an asset of P11,595.80, had grown to P72,569,443.06 as of Dec. 31, 2007, it said.





mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2008, 11:44:45 AM »
Friday, April 04, 2008Print This Page
Two Phase Livelihood Plan aims to Minimise Risk
PHILIPPINES - The Bacolod City Government Employees Multipurpose Cooperative will implement the Swine Livelihood Project in two phases, because it considers the business to be “high risk”.



BACGEM's Board of Directors decided to implement the first phase by giving the responsibility to the officers because of the risk of the animals acquiring Foot and Mouth disease, Hog Cholera virus and other related diseases.

The second phase of the project for the members was supposed to be implemented in the last quarter of 2007, but due to the Hog Cholera Virus that hit the swine industry in Luzon, the supposed series of orientation to inform its members was delayed, it added.

The release also said the swine livelihood project aims to provide income to the cooperative and individual members.

The BACGEM, which was started eleven years ago with an asset of P11,595.80, had grown to P72,569,443.06 as of Dec. 31, 2007, it said.





mr hog

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2008, 01:02:02 PM »
Some great info sir mikey...Iam back in bizniz!

mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2008, 07:48:04 AM »
One can go,but one never really leaves,your back on track.

mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2008, 08:02:27 AM »
Government 'Neglect' is Crippling Business, say Producers
CEBU CITY – Pig producers in Central Visayas says that the lack of government support for the local livestock industry is helping to fuel increases to meat prices.


According to GMA News, pig farmers have been asking for assistance amid rising feed prices and escalating inputs costs. Meat vendors in major markets in Cebu City claim that they are losing out as fewer people are buying meat due to the high prices.

The National Federation of hog farmers blamed increasing costs of feeds and other livestock inputs why they could not sell their products at low prices. Amid calls for support, the Department of Agriculture Central Visayas admitted it could only give technical support to hog raisers



mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2008, 08:05:36 AM »
Expo Tour Leads to Exports
PHILIPPINES - Co-ordination between the National Swine Registry and the local Philippine hog industry during a World Pork Expo Tour has resulted in imports of about $450,000 worth of live breeding swine and semen from the US since last year.

 

A shipment of 230 breeding swine from the US valued at an estimated $270,000 arrived in the Philippines on 8 January.

The imported live breeding swine were:



16 Landrace Boars

73 Landrace Gilts

16 Yorkshire Boars

74 Yorkshire Gilts

20 Duroc Boars

31 Duroc Gilts
Before this shipment, 109 purebred breeding swine valued at $152,000 in addition to an estimated $30,000 worth of hog semen were imported from the US and arrived during July and August last year.

The live swine and semen imports are the result of Post’s assistance in organising and facilitating arrangements for a 50-plus Philippine tour group to World Pork Expo in Des Moines, Iowa, in June last year.

Post worked closely with the National Swine Registry in packaging the tour, which included an orientation and educational tour of US hog farms in Iowa shortly before the World Pork Expo.
 


mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2008, 10:32:53 AM »
New hog farm to benefit Sumilao farmers - San Miguel
PHILIPPINES - San Miguel Corporation (SMC) has appealed to Sumilao farmers who have marched to Manila to “try to look at the bigger picture" in staking their claim on a 144-hectare property in Bukidnon where the company is constructing a state-of-the-art hog farm facility.


In a statement, San Miguel Foods Inc. (SMFI), a subsidiary of SMC, said the farmers need to examine their claims without bias in order to allow both parties to move forward “towards sustainable growth for the province."

The SMFI also maintained that its hog farm project in Sumilao is “anchored on creating shared value both for the company and the community - the farmers in particular" in the province.

“The company earnestly believes in its capability to transform the Sumilao farmers into partner-agricultural entrepreneurs with SMFI serving as stable buyer of their produce - at guaranteed prices," SMFI said.

According to SMFI, the local government of Sumilao invited them to the province as the local government wishes to uplift the social conditions in the province and provide sustainable livelihood for the community that is mostly made up of farmers.

The SMFI said that while there were other “equally attractive offers from other provinces for the company to invest" they chose to put up their hog expansion project in Sumilao because of its commitment to become “a positive force in countryside development" through the building of “stronger communities" and “enhancing individual capabilities."




mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2008, 10:47:25 AM »
Matutum Meat seeks full government accreditation

KORONADAL CITY -- One of the pork meat processing firms tapped to pioneer the country's foray into the export market has not been given permanent accreditation by the government because it lacked requirements, a top meat inspection official said Friday.

Jose Ariel Billones, director of the National Meat Inspection Service-Central Mindanao, noted that what Matutum Meat Packing Corporation has until now is a conditional "AAA" accreditation.

Arroyo Watch: Sun.Star blog on President Arroyo

"The temporary accreditation is set to expire this November. The firm will only be granted permanent accreditation until it submits the necessary requirements," he said in a telephone interview.

Among the requirements for a permanent accreditation, but which is still subject for a yearly renewal, is the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system clearance and establishment of a mini laboratory, Billones said.

But he revealed that Matutum Meat, which is based in Polomolok town, is now in the process of compliance so the firm's operations will not go unhampered once the temporary accreditation expires in November.

"They're doing everything so they will not experience future glitches," Billones said, referring to the looming shipment of the firm's cut pork products outside the country.

Matutum Meat, along with the Davao-based Nenita Quality Foods Corporation, was tapped early this year by the Department of Agriculture for the country's first pork meat shipment abroad, particularly Singapore.

Billones said that Singaporean food and sanitary officials are expected to arrive in Mindanao next month to inspect the facilities of Matutum Meat as well as the condition of piggeries in the area.

Earlier, Stephen Castillo, Matutum Meat general manager, said Singapore has not yet issued an export certificate to the firm pending another round of ocular inspection.

Singaporean experts visited South Cotabato last year to initially assess the condition of the swine industry in the area.

Castillo, in various interviews, expressed confidence the firm could meet the rigid standards set by Singapore, as well as regulations observed in the Philippines.

The firm, which has been in operation for four months now, operates state-of-the art facilities in the venture with an investment of some P200 million. With basically automated machines, the firm has the capacity to process 240 pigs an hour. The company has been serving the domestic market since its operation started.

It is a sister company of the Cebu-based Sunpride Foods Inc., maker of Holiday corned beef and Sunpride canned goods.

Sunpride's slaughterhouse has a long-standing "AAA" rating, supposedly the highest accreditation issued by the NMIS.


For more Philippine news,


mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2008, 10:58:18 AM »
IN NEGROS OCCIDENTAL
OPV sustains services
to ensure animal health 
The Office of the Provincial Veterinarian in Negros Occidental is sustaining its animal health support services to avoid an outbreak of endemic disease in the province, Provincial Veterinarian Renante Decena said in a report to Gov. Joseph Marañon this week.

The report detail the activities of the OPV for the month of July amid reports of hog cholera and other swine diseases outbreak in Luzon provinces.

Decena said Negros Occidental is free from threats of hog cholera, but the OPV has intensified its hog vaccination campaign to ensure protection of hog farms in the province.

In July 2007, OPV said it has vaccinated 54,125 and dewormed 36,974 farm animals. Also, 37,214 animals were diagnosed, treated and castrated. Under the slaughterhouse and livestock auction market, slaughtered were more than 1.198 million animals. These include 996 cattle; 1,652 carabaos; 614 goats; 13,873 hogs; and almost 1.181 million poultry.

The OPV Diagnostic Laboratory examined 581 animals for the period.

Under its Paravet Development Program, 201 paravets attended the 17 paravet/raisers association meetings conducted for the period. Registration of five hog raisers associations are also being processed. As part of its Veterinary Regulation Services, OPV approved the shipment of 102,329 animals, including 16,043 gamefowls; 4,524 hogs; 3,407 goats; and 78,000 old chicks.

Animal byproducts, including meat, shipped from Negros Occidental included 32,160 hatching, table and salted eggs; 203 kilos processed meat and 100,941 dressed chickens.*NLG

 
 
 

mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2008, 12:05:22 PM »
Chinese consortium pledges $5B for agro-industrial projects

A chinese consortium recently inked an agreement with governors of six provinces and Filipino-Chinese company, SL Agritech Corporation (SLAC), to establish an agro-industrial processing enter, and develop 1.3 million hectares for the production of Chinese hybrid corn and hybrid sorghum.

The Fuhua Agricultural Group of China, headed by its Chairman and CEO Liu Ye, pledged to invest five billion dollars in a processing center that will be located in one of six provinces, namely, Camarines Sur, Lanao del Norte, Isabela, Occidental Mindoro, Tarlac and Nueva Ecija. The center will house a feed mill, a brewery, a food factory, a corn processing plant, a cattle raising facility, a slaughterhouse, and biological medicinal garden. Its Philippine partner, SLAC, which is headed by President Henry Lim Liong, is a pioneer in hybrid rice production in the country.

In adition to one million hectares for corn production, the group will also develop 300,000 hectares for cultivation of Chinese hybrid sorghum. Liong said that China’s industrialization is using up its agricultural lands and it is trying to build food baskets in neighboring countries like the Philippines.

National Hog Federation:
 

mikey

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Re: Philippine Hog News:
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2008, 06:19:25 AM »
ARMM can export hogs to other provinces -- reports


By Nash Maulana
Mindanao Bureau
First Posted 06:22pm (Mla time) 04/10/2008


COTABATO CITY, Philippines -- In the midst of increasing prices of meat, enterprising buyers may find it profitable to import hogs from the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM).

A low demand for swine in a region of over five million Muslims and with Christians representing only three percent of the population explains a growing supply of hogs in the ARMM, officials say.

Inventory of animal live weight by the Department of Agriculture shows the region has a stable cattle supply at 10,734 metric tons (MT), which barely outweighs swine at 9,599 MT.

The region has 6,798 MT of water buffalo, 5,972 MT of goat; 8,623 MT of chicken, and 1,486 MT of duck, according to the 2007 ARMM Livestock and Poultry Industry Report.

Swine raising for food is prohibited among Muslims, but some Muslim hunters are up for wild pigs to be bartered for bullets with enterprising non-Muslim dealers.

In terms of hog headcount, Maguindanao posted the highest at 121,140, outnumbering both cattle (41,763) and goats (118,918) in that province.

ARMM is composed of Basilan, Lanao Sur, Maguindanao, Shariff Kabunsuan, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi.

But ARMM Agriculture Secretary Sajid Druz Ali, who hails from Maguindanao, said the region has not been promoting the marketing of pigs. Instead, he said, the region has been strengthening its halal (permitted food) industry with intensified research and development endeavors, improved slaughter houses' facilities as well as healthier and stable cattle and poultry supply.

Ali said agriculture officials gained, from a recent trip to Australia, more knowledge about processing of halal meat, and a commitment of grant in the form of a mobile halal slaughter facility from an organization of Australian Muslims.

An Arabic word "halal" means "permissible" or "lawful" and is the opposite of haram or "prohibited" which is what pigs are for Muslims.

Dr. Norodin Kuit, chief of livestock division of the ARMM's agriculture department, said the swine supply figures naturally increased as pigs were neither slaughtered for food, nor butchered to be sold in the region's marketplaces.

Kuit said traditional Muslim leaders also did not impose strict prohibition of backyard hog-raising among non-Muslim residents.

Ali and Kuit cited as example their hometown of Ampatuan in Maguindanao, where Christians and the Manobo tribe have been freely practicing their ways of life without being reprimanded by Muslim leaders on traditions and practices inconsistent with their beliefs.

In Basilan, there are also more pigs (28,260) than there are goats (24,392), cows (3,685) and carabaos or water buffalo (13,354), the report said.

The house of the Janjalanis, founders of the extremist Abu Sayyaf Group, in Tabuk, Isabela City (Basilan), is closer to backyard hog-raising neighbors than it is to a mosque or to the community madrasa (Arabic school).

Pigs are lowest in number in Lanao Sur (2,700) and Sulu (410), as compared to goats (63,338); cows (42,194); Carabao (52,058) in Lanao Sur, and goat (29,042); cow (12,250); carabao (470) in Sulu, the report said.

But in Tawi-Tawi, there are still more pigs (710) than there are carabaos (93), but are lesser in number than cows (2,492) and goats (10,214).

Meanwhile, an ARMM press statement said the region had a total of 28,243 hectares of irrigated lands, and that 7,209 more hectares would be irrigated in the next three years.

ARMM issued the statement amid fears of impending rice shortage in the country and other parts of the world.

According to DA national statistics, the country produced 15,327,314 metric tons of rice in 2007. ARMM contributed 3.56 percent or 545,211 metric tons to the national production level.

Figures also indicated that the region had 64.8 percent sufficiency level and 35.2 percent deficiency level in the 2006 rice production.

Of the region's six provinces, Maguindanao has the most areas of agricultural land planted to rice at 69,500 hectares.

 

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