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mikey

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Meat Industry Grows as Peso Gains More Value:
« on: March 20, 2008, 08:06:54 AM »
Meat Industry Grows as Peso Gains More Value
PHILIPPINES - The Central Visayas meat industry registered growth in many areas, according to the 2006 annual accomplishment report compiled by the National Meat Inspection Services (NMIS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA) 7.


This, despite the condemnation of 78,011 kilos of meat from carcasses, primal parts and entrails that were condemned by NMIS 7 in 2006.

DA NMIS 7 Director Romeo Capa expressed optimism that 2007 would be a good year for the sector as well.

Capa said the meat industry will be among the most “promising” sectors this year as the Philippine economic landscape continues to show signs of development.

“The country’s economy has improved which increased the capability of consumers to buy imported meat,” said NMIS 7 chief of meat import and export Dr. Alvin Leal.

Leal attributed the strengthening of the peso against the US dollar as among the key factors in the growth of meat importation in the region.

Leal also told Sun.Star Cebu that the increase in the value of the local currency has allowed meat-processing companies to “stock” more imported meat products

THE Central Visayas meat industry registered growth in many areas, according to the 2006 annual accomplishment report compiled by the National Meat Inspection Services (NMIS) of the Department of Agriculture (DA) 7.

This, despite the condemnation of 78,011 kilos of meat from carcasses, primal parts and entrails that were condemned by NMIS 7 in 2006.

Pinoy Votes: Sun.Star Election 2007

DA NMIS 7 Director Romeo Capa expressed optimism that 2007 would be a good year for the sector as well.

Capa said the meat industry will be among the most “promising” sectors this year as the Philippine economic landscape continues to show signs of development.

“The country’s economy has improved which increased the capability of consumers to buy imported meat,” said NMIS 7 chief of meat import and export Dr. Alvin Leal.

Leal attributed the strengthening of the peso against the US dollar as among the key factors in the growth of meat importation in the region.

Leal also told Sun.Star Cebu that the increase in the value of the local currency has allowed meat-processing companies to “stock” more imported meat products.

Production

NMIS 7 data revealed that a total of 15.16 million heads of food animals — including cattle, goat, swine, chicken, carabao, goat and horse — were slaughtered last year resulting in the production of the 73.16 million kilos of meat.

The number of food animals slaughtered in 2006 was 16.74 percent higher compared to only 12.98 million heads with 63.63 million kilos of meat produced in 2005.

Cebu Province ranked first in the number of animal heads slaughtered in the region accounting for 82 percent with 12.45 million heads that produced 59.04 million kilos of meat. Oriental Negros came next followed by Bohol and Siquijor.

The report also said chicken topped the list of most number of heads slaughtered with 14.23 million heads, followed by hog, cattle, goat, carabao and horse.

Pork ranked first in volume of meat with 48.11 million kilos, accounting for 65.7 percent of total volume of meat produced for the period. This was followed by dressed chicken, beef, carabeef, horsemeat and chevon (goat meat).

Condemned meat

According to the NMIS report, the condemnation of more than 78,000 kilos of meat resulted in the economic losses to farmers and livestock raisers amounting to about P7.3 million based on the current prices of meat.

The report said the most common causes of condemnation after anti-mortem inspection were that the condemned meat came from dead animals.

Income for the region also increased by 13.09 percent or P2.68 million in 2006 compared to P2.37 million in the previous year.
The income came from the collection of accredited meat establishments and imported meat inspection fees, among others.

In an interview, Capa said NMIS 7 continues to monitor the prices of meat in the province.

For 2006, the average price of beef in public markets was P155.42 per kilo while pork was sold at P137.66 per kilo, chevon at P170.50 per kilo, and chicken at P96.66 per kilo.

However, prices of meat sold in supermarkets were slightly higher than those in public markets by P5 to P10.

NMIS 7 data also revealed that meat importation in Central Visayas also increased by six percent with 10,499.21 metric tons of meat entering the region last year from 9,901.69 metric tons the previous year.

For 2006, pork ranked first in meat importation with 4,772.82 metric tons, followed by buffalo, beef and poultry. (MMM)



 

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