Google

Author Topic: European Hog News:  (Read 90306 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2009, 06:47:08 AM »
UK Slaughter Statistics - August 2009
UK - According to the latest figures from Defra (Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), the UK's home-killed production of pork rose (but only slightly) in July, owing to it being a five-week month.

 

The number of clean pigs sent for slaughter in Julu was 885,000 compared to 708,000 in June and 675,000 in May. 20,000 sows and boars went for slaughter last month, while 15,000 went for the same in May and June.

The slaughter weight for clean pigs dropped in July, where the numbers stand at 76.9 kg, compared to 77.4 kg and 77.7 kg in June and May respectively. On the other hand, the average dressed carcase weight for sows and boars rose, if only by a little, at 155.2 kg compared to 151.2 kg in June and 149.1 kg in May.

Overall, the UK produced 71,000 tonnes of pigmeat last month, compared to 57,000 tonnes in July, 55,000 tonnes in May and 67,000 tonnes in April.



mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #46 on: August 27, 2009, 11:33:29 AM »
United Kingdom - Organic Statistics 2008
UK - There have been significant increases in the numbers of cattle, sheep and pigs reared to organic standards between 2007 and 2008, while organic poultry numbers have fallen slightly.

 

The latest National Statistics produced by Defra on the organic farming sector were released on 20 August 2009, according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority. The full report shows information gathered during 2008 for organic crops and livestock produced in the United Kingdom, and the numbers of organic producers / processors who are registered with Organic Certification Bodies in the UK.

For organic animal numbers, the table shows that for cattle, sheep and pigs, the general trend has been for numbers to increase by 30 to 40 per cent between 2007 and 2008. The numbers of organic poultry have fallen by two per cent, and there has been a significant drop in the number of organic goats kept in the UK over the same period.

Organic livestock numbers in the UK
  2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Change 2008/2007
(%)
Cattle 126,813 174,751 214,276 244,752 250,376 319,587 27.6
Sheep 440,674 571,615 691,000 747,299 863,122 1,178,306 36.5
Pigs 48,803 43,733 29,995 32,926 50,435 71,229 41.2
Poultry 2,166,152 2,431,555 3,439,548 4,421,326 4,440,698 4,362,939 -1.8
Goats 699 513 544 585 539 409 -24.1
Other livestock 1,015 1,183 1,486 4,318 3,415 4,372 28.0




mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #47 on: August 29, 2009, 07:50:46 AM »
BPEX: China a Major Export Opportunity
UK - Agreement to export pig meat to China is nearing fruition as a delegation of Chinese veterinarians visits the UK next month.

 

Four vets from the Certification and Accreditation Administration of the People's Republic of China will be visiting the UK between 2 and 11 September to access British pork production from farm to abattoir, cutting plants and export cold stores.

This important visit is one of the last links in the chain of accreditation for pork exports to China. The group will be hosted jointly by Defra, BPEX and QMS as well as individual processing companies.

BPEX Director Mick Sloyan said, "This is the final hurdle and the conclusion of years of work to gain access to the Chinese market for pork.

"The Far East is already an important destination for British pork with exports, approaching £20 million a year.

"However, China is by far the largest and most attractive market and has a strong demand for cuts of pork that are less popular in Europe. After all, half the world's pork is eaten in China.

"We have been working closely with the Chinese authorities and gaining access to mainland China should be a valuable addition to our export business."

The group will be accompanied by a Defra veterinarian, a meat exporter and a translator and will visit five processors, a cold store, a pig farm and a laboratory.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #48 on: September 01, 2009, 11:57:05 AM »
UK Industry Counters Cancer Scare Reports
UK - The British meat industry has hit back at fresh reports that have linked eating red meat and processed meats to cancer.



The latest reports, based on previously published surveys, warned that eating processed meats, such as ham and salami, could raise the risk of bowel cancer.

And the campaign groups targeted children's lunch boxes and warned parents about giving children processed meats.

However, the British Pig Executive and the English Beef and Lamb Executive have said that the latest reports are based on old research that has already been countered.

"This is the same recycled report they have been re-issuing for the last 18 months. There is nothing new in it whatsoever," BPEX said.

"No single food is going to make a massive difference to somebody's chances of developing cancer.

"The FSA has said: 'Processed meats, such as ham and salami, can form part of a balanced diet and parents should not be concerned about including these in their children's lunchboxes now and again.'"



mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #49 on: September 06, 2009, 07:44:37 AM »
Space is at a Premium
UK - Although fewer pigs were rolled by contract buyers and the last of the short weeks (until Christmas) is out of the way, spot demand remained fickle with space at a premium.

Contract sellers are still smiling most of the way to the bank and this week the DAPP dropped by only 0.28p to stand at 152p, so those selling on a DAPP-plus-4p basis were receiving around 15p more than equivalent spot quotes.

Where there was space, prices in the region of 140p were available for heavy bacon on a 14 probe with 2p to 4p above this on a tighter spec.

During the week interest perked up in lighter weight pigs for the "shop" trade, but the barbeque season is probably well and truly over for another eleven months and three weeks.

The value of the euro eased a shade this week and traded on Friday worth 87.1p, compared with 88p the week before.

Despite this, demand for cull sows continues to move ahead due to shortage of numbers, although European sow prices have remained unchanged.

As a result sow sellers with large loads available were able to command prices of 118p (or more) and this sector remains very much a seller’s market.

Weaner prices on the other hand are continuing to ease for a number of factors including some northern and western finishers still being tied up with what is fast becoming more like the rice harvest than a cereal one and a slow down in clearing finished pigs before re-stocking.

The latest AHDB 30kg ex-farm weaner average has now slipped to £53.37/head compared with £57.30/head in early June.

Further improvements in the value of European pigmeat will give producers some comfort for the autumn, but the good news is that the gap between United Kingdom and European Union pigmeat values is gradually narrowing but will continue to be influenced by the strength (or otherwise) of sterling.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #50 on: September 09, 2009, 09:39:53 AM »
Sudden Death: Suspect Split Livers
UK - Several sudden deaths in young pigs may be linked to vitamin E and/or selenium.

 

The appearance of dead pigs obviously pale and white is a not uncommon finding on the pig farm, according to National Animal Dsiease Information Service (NADIS).

All this indicates is anaemia, which can occur as a result of failure to manufacture blood, destruction of blood within the body or loss of blood from the blood stream either into body cavities or externally.

Pigs found pale and dead suddenly around or just after weaning can result from rupture of the liver and subsequent haemorrhage in to the abdomen. Whilst such damage can result from trauma – more likely whilst still on the sow or through extremely rough handling.

Where several cases occur, a deficiency of vitamin E/selenium should be considered, especially if the pigs affected represent the best in the group.

Full investigation of vitamin E and selenium levels is necessary should this condition be seen before appropriate and cost-effective corrective action can be taken.



mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #51 on: September 12, 2009, 07:38:29 AM »
NPA Calls for Rethink on Vitamin A
UK - To protect consumers, the European Food Standards Agency has proposed new maximum levels of vitamin A in animal feed.


The revised maximum levels suggested by the agency are as follows (IU vitamin A kg-1).

Piglets 16,000.
Fattening pigs 6,500.
Gestating sows 12,000.
Lactating sows 7,000.

NPA has consulted experts within its membership (nutritionists, scientists and vets) on vitamin A levels required for each growth stage in pigs. The consensus view is as follows:

Young piglets (<20kg) 10,000–15,000.
Early growers (20-30kg) 10,000–12,000.
Growers (30-50kg) 7,500–10,000.
Finishers (50-100kg) 7,500–10,000.
Gestating sows 8,000–10,000.
Lactating sows 10,000-12,000.

"There are some significant disparities between what is proposed and what is applied in commercial practice," says NPA’s Dr Zoe Davies in a letter to the European Commission’s health and consumer department.

"In particular grower/finisher pigs and lactating sows might experience suboptimal bone growth and calcium metabolism if the new levels were applied over a long period."

She is calling on Brussels to carry out a more rigorous review of vitamin A levels, using recent studies to identify gaps in knowledge and to ascertain the true vitamin A requirements of modern pig genotypes.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #52 on: September 13, 2009, 06:45:58 AM »
Autumn Rally Beginning to Look Elusive
UK - A slightly underwhelming day for pig traders with limited space available on the spot market, writes Peter Crichton.

Where there were takers, bids around 140p/kg were available for heavy bacon on a 14-probe, although some useful premiums for lighter weights and on a tighter spec in some regions.


Contract prices are continuing to ease and the DAPP took a fairly significant downward step this week falling from 152p to 150.56p.

Since late July the DAPP has dropped by 5p (£3.50-£4/pig) and although many sellers would have given their right arm and parts of the left one at the start of the year for prices at these levels, some signs are emerging that there is unlikely to be the normal autumn price rally and we may have to wait until the spring before demand takes off again.

One of the main problems facing the pig industry (and it will get worse) is lack of competition, with the market dominated by four major retailers who can quite easily turn the supply tap on and off at will, especially if they have access to cheaper European Union imports, which is currently the case.

European pig traders are reporting falling prices in many of the mainland European Union pig production countries, but hopefully this will turn out to be a blip rather than a trend.

Negative European Union mainland prices are also starting to filter through to the cull sow market where prices dropped 2–4p, but in some cases these falls still put United Kingdom prices well ahead of what can be earned selling sows onto the continental market.

Cull sow bids on Friday tended to be in the 113–115p range for smaller loads with sellers of larger lots still able to command a 3–5p premium above this reflecting an underlying shortage of cull sows.

A quick glance at the United Kingdom herd census results for the last ten years (below) underlines just how much the breeding herd has shrunk and the associated shortage of export cull sows with excess slaughter capacity chasing fewer numbers.

As always currency values play a big part in influencing not only the price of imported pigmeat, but also cull sow quotes and this week the euro closed on Friday worth 87.4p, which is almost exactly where it was seven days ago.

Weaner prices continue to reflect a slightly sober view of finished pig prices in early December and the AHDB 30kg ex-farm quote continues to drift downwards and now stands at £53.25/head.

Looking on the bright side however, feed prices are still at relatively low levels and the PCV2 vaccines have worked wonders in terms of mortality and growth rates with PMWS/PDNS becoming almost a thing of the past.

The industry remains haunted however by the threat of swine dysentery which is still rumbling in the eastern and northern counties as well as reports of a new form of what is known in Cockney rhyming slang as the threpenny bits (proper name Neonatal Diarrhea Syndrome) which is a pig killer and despite microbiological testing, no signs have yet been found of the causes - another reason for all pig finishers to steer clear of importing weaners which could have disastrous consequences for the health of the British pig herd in return for trying to save a few bob.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #53 on: September 17, 2009, 08:51:13 AM »
PCV2 Vaccines Reduce Time to Slaughter
UK - PCV2 vaccines improve the lifetime performance of pigs and shorten time to slaughter, according to preliminary results from a BPEX trial.


Full results and analysis of the trial, carried out at the Pig Development Centre’s Leeds University site, Spen Farm, are expected by the end of the month.
,br> The project investigated the effects of sow vaccine Circovac and piglet vaccine Circoflex. It compared the piglet or sow vaccine only, the piglet and sow vaccines combined and an unvaccinated control.

Initial results indicate that the combined vaccine programme reduced time to slaughter by six days. Using only the sow or piglet vaccine in isolation resulted in a reduction of three days.

The sow vaccine appears to reduce piglet mortality in the first 24 hours resulting in heavier litters at weaning, while the piglet vaccine improved growth rates after seven weeks of age.

The work complements field trial results, reported in April, from BPEX's vaccine voucher scheme.


 


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #54 on: September 19, 2009, 07:38:13 AM »
UK Slaughter Statistics - September 2009
UK - According to the latest figures from Defra (Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), the UK's August home-killed production of pigmeat rose quite a bit compared to June and July.

 

The number of clean pigs sent for slaughter in August went up quite sharply at 744,000 compared to 708,000 in June and 888,000 in July. It should be noted that the month of July contained five weeks. The number of sows and boars sent for slaughter in August, however, dropped slightly at 17,000 compared to 15,000 in June and 20,000 in July.

The monthly average dressed weight for clean pigs and sows was 78.1 kg, compared to 77.4 kg in June and 77.2 kg in July. The slaughter weight for sows and boars also dropped in August, where the figures stand at 149.8 kg, compared to 151.5 kg and 155.2 kg in June and July respectively.

In August, the UK's overall monthly home-killed production of pork rose at 61,000 tonnes, compared to 57,000 tonnes and 72,000 tonnes in July.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #55 on: September 21, 2009, 09:47:06 AM »
Europe's First H1N1 Virus in Pigs
NORTHERN IRELAND, UK - Test results indicate a novel H1N1 influenza A virus identified in pigs.



The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) has confirmed that a pig herd here has tested positive for the novel H1N1 influenza A.

Tests on a batch of piglets submitted by a private veterinary practice to the Agri-Food & Biosciences Institute on 11 September have tested positive for the novel H1N1 Influenza A virus.

A DARD spokesperson said: "Influenza viruses, including Influenza A, are present in all pig producing countries, including here and Great Britain and are considered endemic in the pig population. Given that this virus is currently circulating in humans this finding is not unexpected."

As part of the Department's contingency planning, a voluntary Code of Practice for pig keepers has been agreed in conjunction with Industry. The Code of Practice provides guidance to pig keepers on the actions they should take to reduce the risk of introduction of influenza viruses to pig herds and reduce the risk of onward spread if introduction does occur. The Code relates to all influenza viruses and pulls together existing best practice. The Code is based on good biosecurity and herd health management as already practised.

The Department is providing advice to the affected farm and will continue to monitor developments and provide advice to the industry as required. Department of Health & Social Services and Health & Safety Executive NI (HSENI) have also been informed.

The Food Standards Agency has advised that novel H1N1 influenza A does not pose a food safety risk to consumers.





mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #56 on: September 23, 2009, 07:57:53 AM »
Higher Risk of Abnormal Gait in Intensive Systems
UK - In a study of commercial farms, researchers found fewer cases of abnormal gait in finishing pigs than sows or gilts. Pigs kept outdoors or on solid floors with straw had fewer mobility problems than those housed on fully or partly slatted floors.



The prevalence and risks for abnormal gait in finishing pigs, gilts and pregnant sows from a representative cross-section of indoor and outdoor herds in the United Kingdom were investigated in a report published by KilBride and colleagues in the journal, Animal Welfare.

The prevalence of abnormal gait in finishing pigs, maiden gilts, pregnant gilts and pregnant sows from 88 herds was 19.7, 11.8, 14.4 and 16.9 per cent, respectively.

In a multi-variable analysis of 98 herds, there was an increased risk of abnormal gait in pregnant sows housed on slatted floors compared with pregnant sows housed on solid concrete floors with straw bedding or sows housed outdoors on soil.

The lowest prevalence of abnormal gait in finishing pigs occurred in pigs housed outdoors (3.4 versus 19.7 per cent in indoor-housed finishing pigs). However, the difference was not significant because only three farms in the study housed finishing pigs outdoors. In indoor-housed finishing pigs, there was an increased risk of abnormal gait in pigs housed on solid concrete floors with sparse bedding, partly slatted floors or fully slatted floors compared with those housed on solid concrete floors with deep bedding in all areas. However, there were no significant associations between floor type and abnormal gait in gilts.

There was an increased risk of abnormal gait associated with increasing callus, bursitis and capped hock score on the limbs of finishing pigs. This might have occurred because limb lesions cause discomfort or because lame pigs spend more time lying and this increases the risk of limb lesions developing.

Reference
KilBride, A.L., C.E. Gillman and L.E. Green. 2009. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of lameness in finishing pigs, gilts and pregnant sows and associations with limb lesions and floor types on commercial farms in England. Animal Welfare, 18 (3): 215-224.


mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #57 on: September 24, 2009, 09:33:01 AM »
Scottish Pig Herd Drops Again
SCOTLAND, UK - The English breeding herd is up 5.5 per cent and Northern Ireland is up 12 per cent — but the Scottish herd has fallen 10 per cent, a disappointing but not unexpected result.


The June 2009 census shows continued shrinkage of the Scottish pig herd, as a result of high feed costs last year and perhaps increased nervousness about so much of Scotland's processing capacity being in the hands of one company, Vion.

But this time the census results hold a glimmer of hope that the industry has turned the corner and could be stabilising.

There is a 40 per cent increase in the number of gilts being kept for breeding. Admittedly this is comparing current intentions with a disastrously low figure in the June 2008 survey, but it does demonstrate increased confidence among some producers.

Scottish Pig Herd, June 2009
  2007 2008 2009 Percentage change
2008/2009
Breeding herd         
Sows in pig 30,114 26,738 24,026 -10.1%
Gilts in pig 3,830 3,530 3,071 -13.0%
Other sows 6,231 6,671 6,162 -7.6%
Total breeding herd 40,175 36,939 33,259 -10.0%
Barren sows for fattening 762 709 495 30.2%
Gilts 50kg and over to be used for breeding 6,136 3,883 5,478 41.1%
Boars 1,352 1,278 1,198 -6.3%
Total other pigs 408,244 393,094 355,627 -9.5%
Total pigs 456,669 435,903 396,057 -9.1%





mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #58 on: September 25, 2009, 11:20:39 AM »
Scottish Census Reveals Fall in Animal Numbers
SCOTLAND, UK - There were declines in the number of all farm livestock and poultry in the June 2009 census compared to a year previously, including a 10 per cent decrease in the breeding herd and nine per cent fewer fattening pigs. However, gilts for breeding were up more than 40 per cent.



Scotland's Chief Statistician has published final results from the 2009 June Agricultural Census.

There were declines in the number of all farm livestock and poultry compared to the census in June 2008.

The total number of cattle fell by 42,333 (2.3 per cent) to 1.812 million. The number of cows in the beef herd decreased by 14,349 (3.1 per cent) and the number of cows in the dairy herd was down by 4,899 (2.5 per cent). There was a decrease in the number of cattle aged under one year of 16,749 (3.1 per cent).

The total number of sheep fell by 184,828 (2.6 per cent) to 6.9 million. There was a decrease in the number of ewes used for breeding of 70,691 (2.5 per cent) and the number of lambs fell by 79,004 (2.3 per cent).

The total number of pigs fell by 39,846 (9.1 per cent) to 396,057. The pig breeding herd decreased by 3,680 (10.0 per cent), although there was an increase in the number of gilts to be used for breeding of 1,595 (41.1 per cent). There was a decrease in the number of pigs for meat production of 37,467 or 9.5 per cent.

The size of the poultry flock fell by 496,356 (3.6 per cent), to 13.3 million. There was a decrease in the number of broiler and other birds for meat production of 383,072 (4.5 per cent). The number of fowls for egg production fell by 53,082 (1.3 per cent) and the number of fowls for breeding was down by 59,431 (4.6 per cent).



mikey

  • FARM MANAGER
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4232
    • View Profile
Re: England U.K. Hog News:
« Reply #59 on: September 27, 2009, 08:52:09 AM »
Supplies Will Tighten Soon
Despite the surging euro which during the last seven days has risen in value from 90.4p to almost 92p, little of the benefit seems to have filtered through to the United Kingdom pig market yet, writes Peter Crichton in his Traffic Lights commentary.



The DAPP took a medium-sized downward step this week to 149.49p compared with 150.55p seven days ago.


This represents a drop of 4 percent over the last eight weeks, but it is still many times better than its position a year ago when the DAPP stood at a modest 135.92p.

Although there is no doubt that the recent rise in the value of the euro has put up the cost of imports, this comes at a time when European Union pigmeat prices are continuing to slide due to a mixture of poor retail demand and the virtual closure of the “pig curtain” on the Russian border.

For the first time for many months some spot quotes of less than 140p were being heard in the market, although most of the slighter warmer-hearted buyers were still prepared to hold their bids at 140p with premiums available for niche pigs, Freedom Food and other specials.

This underlines the need for producers to go the extra mile and obtain the highest level farm assurance they can because it is at the bottom of the market that pigmeat is seen as a commodity rather than a product and is most affected by cheap imports.

European Union mainland sow prices have also continued to decline in line with falling pigmeat values, but thanks to weakening sterling which must surely be heading for parity with the euro soon, most sow buyers held their prices at stand-on levels in the 114-116p region according to load size and specification.

Weaner prices continue to edge downwards tracking the DAPP despite the availability of cheap feed.

The latest AHDB 30kg ex-farm average is now quoted at £52.81/head and continues to be influenced by a slightly indifferent outlook for pig prices in the months ahead.

On the other hand once the current Indian summer comes to a close and temperatures drop, finished pig growth rates could fall sharply and finished pig supplies will quickly revert from feast to famine.

When this happens we could see processors looking for pigs rather than at them, but there are only really another ten clear trading weeks before Christmas interrupts the market once again.

Another feature has been the remarkable effect that PCV2 vaccines have had on the growth rates and mortality with many producers reporting that vaccinated piglets have “grown like weeds” with much lower mortality, which also helps to explain why more pigs seem to be coming forward from what is currently an almost static breeding herd.


 

< >

Privacy Policy