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mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2008, 12:44:25 PM »
January 17, 2008 - Biofuels should be promoted through a science-based approach   
“A science-based approach to biofuels can help ensure an alternative to fossil fuel, help reduce the adverse impacts of climate change, and improve the livelihood of poor dryland farmers without compromising food security.”

 
This was stressed by former Acting Agriculture Secretary William Dar, in reaction to recent reports that the development of biofuels would adversely compromise food needs of the country.


“Investing in biofuels is not counterproductive and will not adversely affect the country’s ability to produce its own food,” stressed Dar, who is currently Director General of the India-based International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), and chairman of the Committee for Science and Technology of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD).


 “We have proven so at ICRISAT and farmers’ fields in India, where the biofuel feedstocks we are producing are environment-friendly, provide additional income to farmers, and do not compromise food security,” Dar said.
ICRISAT has developed a ‘smart’ bioethanol feedstock in sweet sorghum. Its experts have developed sweet sorghum varieties and hybrids with higher sugar content in their juice.


In October 2006, ICRISAT’s ‘Agri-Business Incubator’ partnered with an Indian company, Rusni Distilleries, to set up a $10-million ethanol processing facility that produces 40,000 liters per day of bio-ethanol from sweet sorghum, benefiting more than 3,000 farmers.


Dar said five investors have also signed up with ICRISAT and Rusni to pursue the same approach in the Philippines.


A ‘smart’ multipurpose crop, sweet sorghum is also drought-tolerant and a sufficient water-user. It only needs one-seventh of the average water requirement of sugarcane.


Sweet sorghum also produces more energy than it consumes. For every unit of fossil fuel energy it consumes, sweet sorghum produces 8 units and can go as high as 12 to 16 units in temperate areas. The only other crop that matches this is sugarcane, which produces 8.3 units of energy for every unit consumed.


Studies have also shown that sweet sorghum is carbon dioxide neutral, emitting only as much carbon dioxide as it absorbs. The emission and absorption is at 45 tons of carbon dioxide per hectare of sweet sorghum.


“There is additional income for farmers, too, even while they can keep the grain for food or the market,” Dar said.
ICRISAT estimates that by planting sweet sorghum instead of grain sorghum, dryland farmers can earn an additional US$40 to US$97 per hectare per crop.


Thus, sweet sorghum has an immense global potential in alleviating poverty, considering that farmers grow regular sorghum over 11 million hectares in Asia and 23.4 million hectares in sub-Saharan Africa.


“We are also promoting the massive planting of field-tested jatropha and pongamia varieties to rehabilitate wastelands and dryland villages in India. When cultivated in this context, jatropha and pongamia do not gobble up areas for food production,” Dar emphasized.


“Moreover, ICRISAT has linked farmers in eight project villages in Nalgonda district of Andhra Pradesh, India, with a biodiesel facility (Southern Online Biotech), where they deliver and sell their harvests of jatropha and pongamia for processing into biodiesel,” he added.


“In the Philippines, the science of cultivating jatropha must first be established through agricultural research before going into mass propagation. Domestication, crop improvement, pruning techniques, and best agronomic practices must be developed to harness the full potential of the crop. Large-scale jatropha plantations should be promoted only after the crop is scientifically studied to optimize its potential for viable biodiesel production,” Dar noted.


“In all, we have to very selective, in that, we should use ‘smart’ crops that are sustainable and do not compromise food security and the environment. Further, such crops like sweet sorghum should be have multi-uses that will provide farmers and their families not only additional incomes, but also food, biofuel feedstock, feed and forage,” Dar concluded. ###

 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2008, 12:46:01 PM »
January 17, 2008 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology students see potential of malunggay oil, recommend crop’s massive cultivation   
THE Philippines should focus on the development of biofuel from malunggay seeds and should support the massive cultivation of the nutritious crop to boost farmers’ income.


This was the recommendation of a team of Masters of Business Administration (MBA) students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), who studied the market outlook on moringa oil as part of their partial requirement for the completion of the Global Entrepreneurship Laboratory course under the MIT’s Sloan School of Management in Boston.


Jesus Benavides of Mexico, Alex Rall of Germany, David Salamon of France and Jose Torbay of Venezuela presented their study during the “Forum on World Marketing Strategies for the Commercialization of Moringa Oil” held at the Director’s Conference Room of the ITCAF Building, Department of Agriculture (DA) Compound in Diliman, Quezon City Wednesday morning.   


They said the Philippines has the potential to create a new global market with the massive cultivation of malunggay, validating the aggressive campaign launched by the DA-Biotechnology Program Implementation Unit (DA-BPIU) headed by Director Alicia Ilaga, for the backyard and commercial planting of Malunggay.


The students said malunggay-oil production could generate millions of jobs and help alleviate poverty in the rural communities.


Salamon said a significant increase in rural population income, especially among farmers, are some of the advantages of “earned income” against “opportunity costs” in venturing into malunggay oil production.
With a 10-hectare farm, a farmer can earn P2 million in revenue during the first year, P3 million in the next three years, and P4 million in the next four years in producing malunggay oil.


Planting corn, a farmer would earn P1,440,000  per year while planting coconut, a farmer would earn P814,000 per year.  In addition, the meal, locally referred to as sapal, of malunggay seeds can be used as feeds.
The labor force per plant is estimated at 100 employees.  By 2010, around 3,000 employees are expected to join employed lot in 30 manufacturing sites.


They said most of the land needed for the massive cultivation of malunggay is not being used, thus, would not compete with food production.
 
The MIT-MBA Team, however, said venturing into the malunggay oil production entails cost.  At least P250 million is needed to put up an extraction facility to ensure the production of malunggay oil that will pass European and US standards.


Aside from biofuel, the group said there are other options, such as venturing in high-end cosmetics and production of leaves for food consumption and food processing.


The team of MBA students from MIT studied the viability of global commercialization of malunggay oil, and examined its potential markets and has put together the foundation for a realistic marketing strategy in cooperation with Secura International Corp., a local biotech company who pioneered the extraction of pure oil from the seed of malunggay. (biolife news service)

 
 
 
 
   


mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2008, 12:48:11 PM »
January 17, 2008 - D.A., UPLB ink pack on distribution of high-quality corn seeds   
The Department of Agriculture (DA) and the University of the Philippines Los Baños Foundation Inc. (UPLBFI) are embarking on a program to deliver P15 million-worth of high-quality, open-pollinated white corn seeds and other legumes to small farmers in time for the wet planting season this May, in a bid to further increase harvests this year and up incomes in the countryside.
 
In a report to Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap, Assistant Secretary Dennis Araullo said the Department and the UPLBFI have inked an agreement covering the production and delivery by the UPLBFI, through the Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB), of 21,700 bags of open pollinated varieties of white corn seeds; 5.3 tons of assorted seeds of vegetables and legumes; and 500,000 root crop seeds.
 
Araullo, who is concurrent national coordinator of the Ginintuang Masaganang Ani (GMA) Corn Program, said these seeds will then be distributed to small farmers growing corn, vegetables, root crops and legumes nationwide as part of the DA’s hunger mitigation initiatives.
 
“Our agreement with the UPLB Foundation will help raise productivity, alleviate hunger and also revitalize the DA’s partnerships with knowledge and research institutions on utilizing modern agricultural technologies for the benefit of our small farmers,” Araullo said.
 
Under the agreement, the DA will earmark P15 million for the production and delivery by the UPLBFI of the open pollinated seed varieties. The DA will also monitor the target production sites and check on the delivery of the seeds.
 
The UPLBFI, through the IPB, will produce and deliver to the DA the required seeds for white corn, legumes, vegetables and root crops; disburse the funds; and assist the Department in monitoring the delivery and performance of the seeds.
 
Araullo said the DA and UPLBFI have chosen to produce open pollinated seeds because farmers can use these varieties for replanting.
 
The production and delivery of the seeds would be done in time for the next wet season planting this May, he said.
As of the third quarter last year, the corn sector reached a growth of 9.5%, with an equivalent production of 5.29 million metric tons.
 
Northern Mindanao produced a total of 535,000 MT of corn in the third quarter, followed by Central Mindanao or SOCSKSARGEN (South Cotabato-Sultan Kudarat-Sarangani-General Santos City area) with 469,000 MT, and Cagayan Valley with 380,900 MT. ####   
 
 
 
   

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2008, 12:50:46 PM »
January 18, 2008 - DA lifts ban on bird, poultry imports from Nebraska   
Secretary Arthur Yap of the Department of Agriculture (DA) has lifted the temporary ban on all imports of domestic and wild birds along with poultry and its products from Nebraska, following official reports showing the absence of any evidence of the avian influenza (AI) virus in the American state in the last four months.
 
Yap ordered the ban lifted after an evaluation done by the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) showed that “the risk of contamination from importing poultry and poultry products from Nebraska. USA is negligible.”
 
He noted that based on the final report submitted by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), or Animal Health Organization, 90 days have elapsed without any evidence of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) since the cleaning and disinfection of infected premises in Nebraska that began in August 27 last year.
 
The Terrestrial Animal Health Code of the OIE sets a three-month period before a country can regain its bird flu-free status after conducting a stamping-out campaign to eradicate birds infected with the AI virus.
 
In August last year, Yap ordered a temporary ban on all bird and poultry imports from Nebraska and Virginia based on official reports confirming the presence of the AI virus in these states.
 
The DA has also banned the entry of birds, poultry and its products from Korea, Saudi Arabia, Poland and the western African country of Benin to protect human health and the poultry industry in the Philippines, which has remained free of bird flu ever since the H5N1 strain of this virus resurfaced in Asia in 2003.
 
The Philippines is one of only three AI-free countries in Southeast Asia. The two others are Brunei and Singapore.
 
As of Jan. 15, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that 217 out of 350 people found in laboratory-confirmed cases to have been infected with the AI virus have died since the H5N1 strain of the bird flu virus resurfaced in Southeast Asia in 2003 and then spread across the rest of the continent, Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
 
This cumulative number represents a high human mortality rate of roughly 60% for this virus.
 
Earlier, Yap had ordered the BAI to step up its implementation of border patrols, quarantine measures and other preventive steps to keep the Philippines AI-free amid the resurgence of the bird flu virus in Asia, particularly Indonesia, Myanmar and Pakistan.
 
Yap had directed BAI Director Davinio Catbagan to intensify the implementation of these preventive measures in airports and seaports in the cities of Davao and General Santos owing to their proximity to Indonesia, one of Asia’s bird-flu infected countries.
 
Also, it had been carrying out strict monitoring and control measures to prevent domestic poultry and ducks to come in contact with migratory birds from the 20 critical areas identified under the Avian Influenza Prevention Program (AIPP) and has been constantly upgrading and installing new laboratory equipment, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machines that are used to accurately and swiftly detect the presence of the AI virus. ###   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
 
 
 

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2008, 04:26:32 AM »
Plans for halal standards hits a snag
[19 February 2008] The Philippines plan to come out with halal standards for food production has hit a snag. An interagency group is set to present the “First Philippine General Guidelines on Halal Food” to President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, however, World Halal Council (WHC) Secretary General Abdul Rahman RT Linzag said that the proposed standards are not up to WHC standards and may only be good for local consumption, adding that the guidelines “were based on the rule of the majority and popular tastes” rather than what are acceptable to other countries in relation to halal. The Philippines is trying to establish halal guidelines to take advantage of the USD 200-billion global halal market.
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mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2008, 04:43:21 AM »

[1 February 2008] The Philippine corn industry is expected to get a boost with the Department of Agriculture plan to put up 45 corn drying centers worth PHP 1.35 billion (USD 3.5 million). Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap said the centers, each with a capacity to dry 200 tons every 36 hours, would be put up starting in mid-2008 in the Visayas and Mindanao. The centers should help cut back on postharvest losses, about 10% of which is due to improper corn drying.

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #21 on: March 25, 2008, 04:50:15 AM »

[29 January 2008] The Philippine feed milling industry forecast a weak growth in 2008 as production costs have gone up by as much as 30%. Philippine Association of Feedmillers Inc President Norman Ramos said that the industry’s growth depends highly on how the livestock and poultry sectors will perform, however these sectors have expressed concerns over the rising cost of production, especially the 20% rise in raw materials. Mr Ramos said some some small feedmillers are already struggling to survive amid higher costs, and has called on the government to ensure higher local corn production this year.


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mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #22 on: March 25, 2008, 04:52:35 AM »
[29 January 2008] Philippine Department of Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap expressed confidence that the corn output would grow past the government growth target of 10% in 2008, adding that the industry could’ve grown by as much 14% last year had it not been for the typhoons that hit the country. Earlier Agriculture Undersecretary Dennis Araullo said corn output is projected to reach 7.37 million tonnes, pushing the country’s corn self-sufficiency level to 94%.
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mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #23 on: March 25, 2008, 06:26:29 AM »
Hike in pork, beef prices prompts DA to inspect QC markets
01/25/2008 | 03:37 PM

Email this | Email the Editor | Print | Digg this | Add to del.icio.us Prices of pork and beef spiked up in at least two major wet markets in Quezon City, prompting the Department of Agriculture Sec. Arthur Yap to personally inspect the situation on Friday morning.

GMA News reported that Yap inspected the Mega Q-Mart wet market in Quezon City to discover that the price of pork has already risen up to P155 per kilogram, a steep P20-increase, while the price of beef, which was previously pegged between P190 to P220 a kilo, has gone as high as P240, the report added.

At the Kamuning Market, also in Quezon City, the price of beef shot up by P30 and is at P230 a kilo, while pork is being sold at P150 from P140 per kilo.

When asked what prompted them to increase the prices of their meat, the vendors told Yap that the rising petroleum prices in the world market was to blame.

"Hindi natin inaasahan bigla tumataas din ang presyo ng gasolina. Yung mga bumabyahe ng baka syempre gumagamit ng sasakyan sa araw araw yan kada byahe. So pag tumaas ang gasolina ganun rin ang ipapatong nila sa karne (The price of gasoline would unexpectedly rise. Of course, meat dealers use vehicles every time they transport meat. So the increase in gasoline price would be relative to the increase in meat prices)," a meat vendor said.

Other vendors also cited the shortage in meat supply and the increasing price of poultry feeds as other factors in the sudden spike of prices of meat.

For his part, Yap admitted to being surprised by the situation because in other wet markets, he said that vendors have reportedly been able to keep prices at bay amid the mounting prices of feeds and petroleum.

The Agriculture cited as an example the Commonwealth Market, also in Quezon City, where the price of pork remains locked at P135 per kilogram.

Yap also allayed fears of a looming shortage in the country's meat supply, adding that he has already enlisted the three largest hog raisers in the Philippines to help in easing the rising prices of their poultry products.

"Puwede pang ibaba sa tingin namin. Kaya para sa mga mamimili natin, tumawad kayo (We think the prices can still be For our consumers, try negotiatiating for a lower price)," Yap advised. - Mark Merueñas, GMANews.TV

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2008, 11:37:20 AM »
Filipino Livestock Farmers Acquire a Cutting Edge      March 25 2008
PHILIPPINES - Good news is just around the corner for livestock and meat exporters of the Philippines, says Agricultural secretary Arthur Yap.



Having been hit badly by the strengthening peso the industry will take relief with the extension of the Agricultural Competitiveness and Enhancement Fund (ACEF) until 2015.

Yap said Congress' approval of the law will allow the Department of Agriculture (DA) to use the P7.4 billion funds to bankroll much needed projects meant to sharpen the competitiveness of Filipino farmers in the face of global free trade.

Yap said among the steps he has undertaken is to order the National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS)to waive the collection of inspection and laboratory fees on pork and pork products.

To support this, he said the DA will establish regional laboratory facilities in the cities of Cebu, Cagayan de Oro and other key export growth centers so that laboratory testing will be cheaper.

Yap said the DA's efforts to promote Philippine livestock and poultry products overseas is expected to bring Mindanao's frozen pork products to Singapore and Japan in the months to come.

On the other hand, Yap said the DA is pursuing measures to boost the incomes of livestock and poultry exporters is keeping with the mandate of President Arroyo for the DA to focus on food production and job generation.

DA reported that the gross value of livestock and poultry production shot up by 5.04 percent to P163.2 billion and by 6.77 percent to P117.7 billion in 2007, respectively.




mr hog

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2008, 11:49:44 AM »
Sounds like good news is coming support the natives lol!

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #26 on: March 27, 2008, 01:39:19 AM »
Guess I will never live this down lol.

mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2008, 01:48:38 AM »
Monday, March 10, 2008
Exec: Pork shipment gets Singapore's nod

GENERAL SANTOS CITY -- The National Meat Inspection Service in Central Mindanao announced last week that Singapore's Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority has given the go signal for a pork processor in the region to export meat parts to the island state.

Jose Ariel B. Billones, regional meat inspection director, said the Singaporean authority relayed the clearance to their main office for Matutum Meat Packing Corporation to pioneer the shipment of fresh frozen cut pork meat products.



The go signal from Singapore for Matutum Meat was made known by Jane C. Bacayo, NMIS national director, during a national consultation among government meat inspectors in Boracay about two weeks ago, according to Billones.

"But there's no particular date as yet when the actual export would take off," he said.

Singapore's go signal for Matutum Meat, which is based in Polomolok, South Cotabato, came even if the regional meat inspection agency is still awaiting compliance documents from the firm, he added.

On February 18, Billones said Singaporean experts did not give a clearance to Matutum Meat following the foreigners' site inspection last January 28, due to concerns on anti-biotic residues found on pork meat.

Billones said the issue on anti-biotic residue was addressed by tracing the origin of pigs through the assignment by Matutum Meat of codes to piggery owners.

"Also, we have conducted consultations with the piggery owners that they should raise their hogs without anti-biotic supplements just to meet the requirement of Singapore," he said.

Billones stressed that all processed hogs that will be bound for Singapore will also be strictly tested for anti-biotic residues before they will be shipped.

The "other minor problems" Billones said is being addressed by Matutum Meat, as recommended by the Singaporean experts, are the chlorination of water and the setting up of tire disinfectant on vehicles entering the firm's plant.

This paper tried to reach Bacayo, the NMIS national director, in Manila for more details and confirmation, but he was reportedly out.

Stephen Castillo, manager of Matutum Meat, could not also be contacted for comments, but he earlier expressed confidence the company can meet the requirements of Singapore.

Matutum Meat, a sister company of Cebu-based Sunpride Foods, Inc. which produces Holiday corned beef and Sunpride canned goods, has invested around P200 million for its state-of-the-art processing plant in Polomolok town.

Matutum Meat is one of two companies, the other one being the Davao City-based Nenita Quality Foods Corp., which the Department of Agriculture (DA) tapped to pioneer the country's foray in the foreign pork market.

Singaporean experts are reportedly set to visit the facility of Nenita's in June, as Davao meat traders expressed hopes it too will be given clearance just like Matutum Meat.

Mindanao has been chosen by the national government to initiate the country's pork export since the island has been certified as free from the foot-and-mouth disease, the recognition coming from the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) or World Organization for Animal Health.

Agriculture Secretary Arthur C. Yap has originally targeted the nation's foreign pork shipment to take place in July 2007 after announcing the development earlier in the year.


mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2008, 05:05:52 AM »
Philippine Pork Market 2008
By Pia Abuel-Ang, USDA FAS GAIN Report. The Minimum Access Volume (MAV) utilization for pork increased from five to 19 per cent last year, indicating an increase in importation of more premium pork cuts. In October 2007, the Philippine Department of Agriculture announced that it would be reviewing its MAV regulations, which is expected to be completed within the first quarter of 2008.

 

Tariff Rate Quota: Data from the Minimum Access Volume (MAV) Management Committee of the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) shows that in 2007, utilization rates of tariffrate- quotas (TRQ) or MAV for pork increased from five per cent in 2006 to 19 per cent in 2007, indicating more imports of higher-value pork cuts, such as bellies and other unspecified prime cuts.







MAV usage for pork has been relatively low, due in part to the entry of large quantities of buffalo meat with a low tariff rate of 10 per cent and illegally imported pork in the market. Buffalo meat, from India, has been traditionally used in the Philippines as a substitute for pork by the local meat processing industry. MAV utilization is expected to remain low due to the high in-quota duties for pork as well as high pork prices in the world market relative to the price of local pork. Majority of the pork imported in the Philippines is pork rind and pork fat.

WTO Commitments: Since 2005, the DA has continued to maintain 10th or final-year MAV levels under its Uruguay Round commitments. For pork HS 0203, the final-year MAV was 54,210 MT. The DA previously stated that it will continue to do so until such time as a new WTO agreement is reached. In October 2007, the DA announced that it would defer the distribution of 2008 MAV licenses, while it undertakes a review of MAV distribution guidelines. According to the DA, the review is being undertaken in order to allow new entrants and more entities to participate in the MAV system. On 17 January 2008, the DA released the MAV allocations for 2008, pending completion of the review, which temporarily disrupted trade for about 3 months. The review is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2008.

Tariff Rates: In-quota and out-of-quota tariff rates for MAV commodities have not changed since 2005. Tariff rates for pork are as follow:




1 ASEAN Free Trade Agreement-Common Effective Preferential Tariff






Imports: Last year, according to data from the Philippine Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI), total pork imports increased by 43 per cent, mostly composed of pork rinds or skin and pork fats used by the meat processing industry. The Philippines imported about 32 per cent of its pork requirement from Canada and about 16 per cent from Germany. The United States supplied a little over 13 per cent (10,351 MT), mostly pork offals, fats and other unspecified pork cuts.







Production: Live hog production grew by 2.72 per cent in 2007 and 3.66 per cent in 2006. Hog production is expected to expand in 2008, albeit only marginally, due to increasing cost of feeds. In 2007, the Philippines imported 273 head of swine for breeding from the United States, an increase of 174 percent from the previous year (USDA/ERS FATUS Reports). Already in January 2008, local hog associations reported the arrival of 230 live hogs imported from the United States (see GAIN RP8003).







Consumption: Philippine population is roughly 90 million and growing at a rate of 2.36 per cent per year. According to the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics, annual per capita consumption of pork at 13.88 kg, grew by 1.39 per cent in 2006, while consumption of pork offal grew by 3.57 per cent.







Processed Meat: Demand for processed meat products is expected to remain strong. Canned food is very popular among Filipino households. Though canned meat/meat products had been losing popularity in recent years due to increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles, demand for such products is being awakened by more aggressive campaigns by suppliers. Due to low Philippine per capita income, demand for frozen food will remain extremely pricesensitive. Hotdogs, hams, sausages, salami and meat patties for burgers are favorite chilled processed meats among consumers.

Demand for imported processed food products will remain relatively strong given the following factors: the growing interest and preference for western style cuisine, an increasing number of dual-income families and the increasing popularity of branded processed products. Additionally, a growing segment of young consumers is demanding imported products as a growing urbanization of the Philippine population spurs this growth.

According to the Philippine Association of Meat Processors Inc. (PAMPI), the domestic meat processing industry is forecast to continue to grow. The growing demand for processed meat products, which is estimated to be about 60 percent of the domestic meat market, is expected to drive this growth. Canned goods, in particular, have a strong growth potential due to wide distribution prospects in both traditional retail outlets such as supermarkets and groceries as well as remote neighborhood convenience stores or “sari-sari” stores in rural areas.

PAMPI is looking to expand into the international market. With the recognition of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) that most parts of the country are free from foot-andmouth disease, PAMPI is reportedly optimistic about the country’s potential to export more products and to become the regional production hub for processed meat products.











However, the industry’s growth and export potential are constrained by lack of new investment, an increasing global trend towards more stringent sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements for food products, and a limited source of raw materials, particularly beef, a base ingredient for most canned meat products. Because of the relatively small domestic cattle industry, local meat processors must source most of their meat requirements from outside the country such as India, and South America as well as Australia, Europe and the United States.

Foot-and-Mouth Disease: On 4 January 2008, the Philippine DA filed an application for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) free certification from the Office International des Epizooties (OIE), after having an absence of FMD outbreaks since the start of 2006. Under OIE rules, a country seeking FMD-free zone certification must have had no cases of FMD for at least 24 months before the time of application. According to the DA, an international scientific committee from the OIE will convene in March to evaluate the Philippine application, along with that of other countries. Should the Philippines’ application be favorably received by the committee, the DA expects to receive the FMD-free certification, but with vaccination, from the OIE by May 2008. After one year of attaining FMD-free status, the Philippines may once again apply for a more stringent FMD-free status, with no vaccination if no outbreaks occur. The Visayas and Mindanao islands have already been certified by the OIE as FMD-free in 2002.

The Philippines is hopeful that this certification from the OIE would pave the way for more Philippine meat exports to other countries. The DA is looking at prospective markets in Singapore and China for Philippine pork products. The Philippines is hopeful that the upcoming inspections of Philippine meat facilities by the Singapore government would result in eventual market access for local products.

Currently, the DA’s Bureau of Animal Industry restricts the movement of animals and uncooked/unprocessed meat products, including imported meat products from FMD infected countries, from Luzon to other OIE declared FMD-free zones such as Visayas or Mindanao. Imported meat products from FMD countries are only allowed to enter Luzon, provided that certain measures are in place (i.e., boneless, deglanded meat, with proper maturation and appropriate quarantine protocols, etc.). Moreover, imported meat products from FMD countries may only be imported for use by the meat processing industry and cannot be sold in the retail markets. The BAI is currently implementing a "biosecurity" program, which emphasizes the proper handling of livestock to prevent diseases, instead of vaccinating infected swine.

The Philippine DA will not likely change any policy on the movement of livestock and unprocessed animal products, even after receiving FMD-free, with vaccination certification However, should the Philippines eventually attain FMD-free status, with NO vaccination (expected by May 2009 at the earliest) the current restrictions on the movement of live animals and uncooked meat products may be reviewed, to be made consistent with policies currently implemented in Visayas and Mindanao. These possible changes may have implications on the movement of imported and domestic live animals within the country, as well as importation of meat products from FMD-countries. How these issues are eventually resolved will directly impact U.S. exports of both meat products and livestock.



mikey

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Re: D.A. News Updates:
« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2008, 10:34:45 AM »
DA fears extinction of native chicken


By Delmar Cariño
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 00:29:00 02/16/2008


LA TRINIDAD, BENGUET – Native chickens in the Cordillera are disappearing at an alarming rate and the region’s Department of Agriculture is worried that the breed would soon become extinct.

The DA’s poultry specialists told a media forum at the Agriculture Training Institute here on Thursday that native chickens have failed to sustain their potential as a steady source of meat products.

Blame it on the people’s attitude of confining the raising of native breeds in the backyard and the rapid commercialization of “free range” chickens, said Dr. Jerry Sabado of the DA’s quarantine services.

“Native chickens do not receive enough attention from their owners because they are raised more for backyard purposes than as a major source of livelihood,” he said.

The effect was that generations of native chickens gave way to the massive increase in the commercialization of free range chickens, he said.

Sabado said free range chickens are the common broiler type that could be raised and sold in 45 days.

Dr. Miriam Tiongan, of the Benguet veterinary office, shared Sabado’s views, saying the province alone has become a wide market for commercially raised chickens.

Thousands of them are delivered to different outlets in the province, spinning a profitable distribution business, she said.

“The Cordillera is basically an importer of live chickens,” she said.

Sabado said this reality has sidelined the business potentials, and even the health benefits, of raising native chickens.

Compared to most free range chickens, native breeds are more organically based since they do not require dosages of antibiotics and commercial feeds.

“They could feed themselves on green grasses and plants, insects and other natural commodities found in the soil,” he said.

“When cooked, it cannot be denied that their meat tastes better,” he added.

But native chickens take a longer time to raise, compared to the free range chickens, Sabado noted

 

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