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mikey

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China Hog Industry News
« on: September 24, 2009, 09:29:08 AM »
China Restricts EU Pork Due to H1N1 Fears
GLOBAL - The European Union's health chief said today that China had slapped restrictions on pork imports from four member states over swine flu concerns - a move she slammed as protectionist.



"We've had restrictions by China on the import of pork from several European Union member states because of H1N1 found in two farms in Northern Ireland," Androulla Vassiliou, EU health and food safety commissioner, told reporters.

"This will be of great concern to the EU because it's interpreted as being protectionism," she said on the second day of a visit to Beijing.

China announced the measure - which affects Denmark, France, Italy and Spain - on Friday, she added.

Yahoo! Finance reports that Beijing has required additional testing on all pork meat from these countries, and the disinfection of all containers, which means additional costs for exporters.

Pork imports from Northern Ireland are already subject to Chinese restrictions, officials said.

Officials at the Chinese commerce and agriculture ministries, as well as the food safety watchdog AQSIQ, were not immediately available for comment.

"Last May we had a joint declaration by the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organisation... saying very clearly that consumption of pork does not transmit the H1N1 virus," Ms Vassiliou said.

"So there is no point in restricting trade in pork."

Ms Vassiliou said she had conveyed the European Union's concerns on Tuesday to China's vice-minister of agriculture.

She said she would also ask the head of AQSIQ - the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine - to lift the restrictions.

Nations around the world have warned against trade protectionism, especially as the global financial crisis takes its toll.

China and the United States have recently been involved in a dispute after Washington imposed tariffs on Chinese-made tyre imports -- a move that prompted Beijing to lodge a complaint with the World Trade Organization.

Beijing has labelled the US action a "clear trade protectionist move."


 



mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2009, 11:15:52 AM »
China Denies Imposing Restrictions on EU Imports
CHINA - China has never placed any restriction on pork imports from the European Union (EU), and its demand for health certificate from the EU imported pork was needed to prevent the spread of A/H1N1 flu, said Yu Taiwei, head of China's quality watchdog's food safety export and import bureau yesterday.



General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine launched on 18 September a measure requiring an additional testing on all pork meat from five countries including Denmark, France, Italy and Spain.

The EU's health Commissioner Androulla Vassiliou was reported Wednesday as having interpreted China's requirement for strengthening inspection on A/H1N1 virus as "being protectionism".

"We still allow these countries to export pork to China, but only ask for a more intensified inspection," said Mr Yu.

Every country should guarantee the quality securities of its export products, which is its responsibility, according to Mr Yu.

China is a major consumer of meat products. It imported 1.84 million tons last year. The country has also become the world's leading meat producer, whose pork output stood at 44.59 million tons in 2008.




mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2009, 10:23:07 AM »
China revamps design code for pig slaughterhouses
[25 September 2009] A new code of design for pig slaughterhouses was recently released by China’s Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development and AQSIQ. Effective from October 1, the new code has put on a requirement for traceability, chilling facilities for carcass and offal as well as harmless disposal technology. Administrated by the Ministry of Finance, the modified regulation is aimed at lifting standards for slaughter and portioning by combining the related regulation on food hygiene from China, EU, Singapore and Hong Kong.

mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2009, 10:42:15 PM »
Chinese Swine Team Increases Interest in US DDGS
US - A team of nine large-scale hog producers traveled to the United States from China this week to gain practical experience and expand their knowledge in order to improve production efficiency and reduce disease challenges through a US Grains Council-sponsored program.



The team was also educated on the inclusion of US distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) in swine rations. Jason Yan, USGC technical program director in China, who traveled with the group, said, “The program definitely increased the interest and understanding in using DDGS in swine rations.”

This was immediately evident, as upon returning to China, the Council reports two companies represented on the team expressed interest in arranging future purchases of DDGS from the United States. One company imported 10,000 metric tons to-date, contributing to China’s 250,000 to 300,000 tons projected for import in 2009.

The team attended the Leman Swine Production and Veterinary Conference in St. Paul, Minnesota, followed by a training program at the University of Minnesota. Over the course of their travels, the team also traveled to North Carolina to visit large swine farms and meet with veterinarians, adding to their repertoire of US feed grains and swine management experience to take to their respective operations.





mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2009, 09:19:02 AM »
Monday, October 05, 2009Print This Page
China a Promising Market for Food Safety Products?
CHINA - China’s demand for food safety products is forecast to grow 15 per cent per annum through 2013 to 13 billion yuan (US $2 billion), according to a new 252-page Freedonia industry study, entitled Food Safety Products in China.



The study notes that growth will be largely fueled by food and beverage output in processed food, beverage and dairy segments, which are more intensive users of these products. A greater focus on food safety and supply chain security by larger food processing firms in China will also boost growth.

Recent growth is partly in response to enhanced government regulation, in particular the Food Safety Law introduced in 2009. However, the study says that consumer concerns in both domestic and export food markets following a series of food safety scares involving Chinese food will also prompt spending on food safety products by those involved in the various production aspects of the food industry.



mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2009, 08:44:37 AM »
Outbreak of PRRS in Parts of China Reported
CHINA - China's agriculture ministry has announced that an epidemic of swine disease that killed more than 80,000 pigs in 2007 has emerged in parts of the country.



An outbreak of pathogenic blue-eared pig disease, also known as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), has appeared in five areas of China, the ministry said in a statement posted on the central government website.

But the overall swine disease situation in China was stable, the ministry said on Friday, compared with 2007, when blue-eared pig illness killed over 80,000 pigs, led to the culling of 235,000 others and set pork prices rocketing.

"So far this year, the overall swine disease situation in China remains stable, and in particular, the scope of highly pathogenic blue-eared pig disease has significantly shrunk," the statement said.

Channelnewsasia.com reports that until 20 October, just under 3,300 pigs had died from the disease and 7,724 had been culled.



mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2009, 08:24:56 AM »
28 October 2009] UK-based swine genetic company JSR will inaugurate its first satellite nucleus farm in China in December this year. The farm, which will have about 1000 GGP sows, is a joint venture between JSR and its swine breeding partner in central China. According to Dr Grant Walling, the move is aimed at shifting JSR from an export business to pig breeding in China where it sees growing demand for quality pig breeder and to fulfill its commitment to foster a long term business relationship with Chinese customers

mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2009, 08:55:25 AM »
China to Lift H1N1-Related Ban on US Pork
US - With prodding from the Obama administration, China announced on 29 October that it will lift its ban on US pork imports, a move hailed by the National Pork Producers Council.



The Asian nation implemented the ban on US pork in late April in the wake of an outbreak in humans of novel H1N1 influenza, which the media misnamed “swine” flu.

“This is good news for US pork producers, who have been suffering through an economic crisis for the past two years,” said NPPC President Don Butler. “China is, by far, the largest potential money-making opportunity for the US pork industry.”

The US pork industry shipped nearly 400,000 metric tons of pork worth nearly $690 million to China in 2008, making it the No. 3 destination for US pork. This year, due mostly to the H1N1-related ban, US pork exports to China through August were down by 50 per cent over the same period last year.

“A Chinese market reasonably open to US pork would single-handedly put a huge dent in the US-China trade imbalance,” Mr Butler said.

China’s announcement came at the conclusion of the US-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade meeting in Hangzhou, China. The bilateral forum was held to resolve trade issues between the countries. US Trade Representative Ron Kirk, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Commerce Secretary Gary Locke attended the meeting. Re-opening the Chinese market to US pork was at the top of their agenda.

“China’s intent to remove its H1N1-related ban on US pork marks an important step forward in cooperation between the countries on agriculture issues,” said Secretary Vilsack.

“NPPC would like to thank the Obama administration, particularly Secretary Vilsack and Ambassador Kirk, and Congress for pressing China to re-open its market to US pork,” said Mr Butler. “And we would ask that they continue to work with the Chinese government on other trade issues that are hampering our pork exports to China.”

Among those issues are China’s ban on US pork produced with ractopamine, an FDA-approved feed additive that improves efficiency in pork production, and the subsidies China provides its domestic pork producers. The Chinese pork industry also derives significant benefits from an exemption from corporate income taxes and a partial exemption from the country’s value-added tax.


mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2009, 09:14:51 AM »
New PRRS outbreak in China
[3 November 2009] China's Ministry of Agriculture has announced that an outbreak of pathogenic blue-ear disease, also known as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), has reemerged in five provinces of China this year, resulting in 7667 infected pig, 3278 deaths and 7724 culled as of October 20. But the overall swine disease situation in China remains stable, said a statement of the ministry, compared with 2007, when blue ear disease killed over 80,000 pigs, and led to the culling of 235,000 others and set pork prices rocketing.

mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2009, 10:39:53 AM »
New PRRS outbreak in China
[3 November 2009] China's Ministry of Agriculture has announced that an outbreak of pathogenic blue-ear disease, also known as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), has reemerged in five provinces of China this year, resulting in 7667 infected pig, 3278 deaths and 7724 culled as of October 20. But the overall swine disease situation in China remains stable, said a statement of the ministry, compared with 2007, when blue ear disease killed over 80,000 pigs, and led to the culling of 235,000 others and set pork prices rocketing.

mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2009, 12:36:54 PM »
Wednesday, November 11, 2009Print This Page
Zhongpin Reports Record Results for Q3 2009
CHINA - Zhongpin Inc., a leading meat and food processing company in China, has reported higher revenues, net income, and diluted earnings per share for the third quarter of 2009.



Zhongpin also reduced its guidance for the full year 2009 because, even though Zhongpin's sales volume in the third quarter 2009 achieved a record high, pork prices in China are currently not increasing.

According to the company, revenues increased 26.7 per cent in the third quarter 2009 compared to $194.9million from $153.8 million in the third quarter 2008. The company's net income also rose by 30.7 per cent, that is, from $10.1 million to $13.2 million in 2009. Diluted earnings per share increased 29.4 percent to $0.44 from $0.34.

The trend for hog and pork prices during the third quarter 2009 turned upward in July and early August, then stabilized at those somewhat higher levels through September. Prior guidance for the year 2009 has been reduced to account for stable, but not increasing, pork prices and for the higher average number of common shares outstanding because Zhongpin issued 4,600,000 additional common shares on 15 October 2009.

The company announced that it has started to construct three cold storage processing firms and distribution centers adjacent to three of its food processing plants in Henan province. Each center will add approximately 20,000 square meters of space; processing is expected to begin in the second quarter of 2010. Initially, about 40 per cent of the capacity will handle Zhongpin's pork and agriculture products, with the remaining 60 per cent used to provide storage, processing, and allocation services for other food producers. Total cost for all three centers will be approximately $13.6 million.

Construction of two new pork processing plants in Tianjin, which began in April 2009, continued during the quarter. The production lines for chilled and frozen pork products and prepared meat products, with a total of 136,000 metric tons of capacity, are expected to come in line in the first and third quarters of 2010, respectively.

Construction of a new pork processing plant in Changge, with 36,000 metric tons of capacity, is in progress and is expected to come on line in the fourth quarter 2009.

Construction of one premium food oil plant in Changge, with 20,000 tons of capacity, is going on. It is expected to take shape in the second quarter 2010.


 


mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2009, 01:19:51 PM »
CP invests heavily in China’s pig industry
[13 November 2009] Thailand’s CP Group, has kicked off a high profile expansion plan to consolidate its position in the feed arena and foster a new growth point in China. According to the plan, CP will invest CNY 4 billion (USD 588 million) in three respective complexes in the provinces of Hebei, Anhui and Shandong, aiming to have a total capacity of 2 million commercial pigs per year. The complexes consist of breeder farms, commercial farms and slaughterhouses. The first one, located in Qinhuangdao, north China’s Hebei province, will commence operation of a 1200 GGP farm next year and the whole project is expected to turn out 1 million commercial pigs per year by 2015.

mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2009, 09:08:04 AM »
Chinese to Install Pig Feed Intake Data System
CHINA - Chinese feed company Shanghai Xinnong Feed will install an automatic data collection system related to feed intake at their research farm located in Xinchang, Nanhui District, Shanghai City, China.



The so-called Feed Intake Recording Equipment (Fire), manufactured by Osborne Industries, from Kansas, USA, will be used to test the performance of various feed rations and feed ingredients, and the genetic capabilities of breeding pigs, according to Vetsweb.

Shanghai Xinnong is a feed company that focuses on the research, development, manufacturing and marketing of complete feeds, multi-premixes and concentrated feeds for large pig farms in China. Located in Shanghai, Shanghai Xinnong has been supplying feed to farms within Shanghai and the surrounding provinces for more than ten years.

Continuing their expansion in the feed industry, “Shanghai Xinnong plans to select the best performance breeding pigs, using the system to optimise their genetic selection programme”, says Zhang Yi Zao, farm director of Shanghai Xinnong Breeding Pig Farm.

The system is bound to be installed by the end of November. The system automates data collection of feed intake, the weight of each meal an animal consumes, and the weight of each animal. Each feeder is equipped with an antenna which reads the individual Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag, thus identifying each individual animal. The information collected by the feeders is then sent to the on-farm computer programme database.


mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2009, 12:06:54 PM »
Monday, November 23, 2009Print This Page
Pork 'Safe to Eat' Despite Infection Found in Pigs
CHINA - Health experts have assured consumers that Chinese pork is still safe despite reports of pigs being infected with the deadly A/H1N1 flu.



Swine at a slaughterhouse in Heilongjiang province tested positive for the virus last Thursday, the Ministry of Agriculture revealed over the weekend.

Four positive samples were discovered at the abattoir in Shuangcheng by a local flu laboratory, China News Service quoted a ministry statement as saying.

Officials suggested the cause of infection could have been the animals' close contact with humans during transportation.

Gene sequence analysis showed the virus suffered by the pigs is a 99-per cent match with the human H1N1 strain. No mutation was found, the government statement said.

It is the first such infection in China, although there have already been reports in 13 other countries and regions, Beijing Times reported yesterday.

However, experts with the World Health Organization (WHO) insisted well-prepared pork is still safe to eat because the virus cannot survive temperatures of 70°C and above.

China consumed more than 46 million tons of pork last year, around half of the world's total.

Since the outbreak of H1N1 in April, prevention and monitoring of swine has been a priority for the government. The virus was originally known as "swine flu" before it was renamed to dispel any links with pigs.

The information office of the Ministry of Agriculture was unable to comment yesterday, but in a statement last week officials said authorities across China had checked about 87 million pigs, but no influenza virus had been detected.

Meanwhile, four patients in North Carolina in the United States tested positive over the weekend for a new H1N1 strain that is resistant to oseltamivir, or Tamiflu, AP reported.

Tamiflu is one of two flu medicines being used in the fight against H1N1 and health officials have been watching for signs of the virus mutating, making the drugs ineffective.

More than 50 resistant cases have been reported since April, including 21 in the US. Almost all in the US were isolated, officials with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said.

London-based BBC reported five Tamiflu-resistant cases in Wales last week.

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health also said it had detected mutations in three positive samples. The viruses were isolated from the country's first two fatal cases and one other patient.

Norwegian scientists have analysed samples from more than 70 patients, but only in three have mutations been detected. This suggests the mutation is not widespread, say scientists.

Laboratories in Brazil, Japan, Mexico, Ukraine and the US have all detected similar mutations, with the earliest being in April.

Although information is incomplete, the mutations were detected in fatal, as well as mild cases. Experts said the significance of the finding is unclear.

As of Friday, the virus had killed 6,770 people worldwide since April, with 520 deaths in the past week, according to figures released by the WHO yesterday.





mikey

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Re: China Hog Industry News
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2009, 12:08:56 PM »
Monday, November 23, 2009Print This Page
Pigs Get ID Chips in Southwest China
CHINA - Starting Friday, pigs in southwest China from have started having two identity chips fixed on their back legs detailing where they were butchered, examined and sold.



Forty-five markets in downtown Chengdu, capital of Sichuan Province, have started to sell pork with ID chips, said a spokesman with the city's food and drug administration on Friday.

Two plastic rings containing the chips with information on where the pig was bred are fixed around the pig's hind limbs before it is sold off to a slaughterhouse.

Additional information is added to the chips as the pig gets slaughtered, inspected and sold to the end market.

The chip is scanned when each piece of pork is sold so that the customer can have a receipt with a code that links to an entry that records the slaughter, inspection and sale of the pork in a city database.

Every seller is required to scan the ID chip when they purchase meat so that the system logs how much pork they have in stock. Meanwhile, their electronic scales are linked to the market system to keep track of how much pork they sell.

"The amount of pork sold must not exceed that of pork purchased. That way we make sure no pork comes from illegal channels," the spokesman said.

The customer can inquire about the pork by phone, text message or on the administration's website to ensure that it was safely bred, butchered, stored and transported, as well as properly examined.

Pork seller Wu Bo welcomed the policy. "Customers can now buy without hesitation. With the chips, they can eat without worry," Wu said. "If anything goes wrong with the quality, we know who to blame."

The city government and seller pays for every identity chip, which costs two yuan (29 US cents), the spokesman said. "The cost is too small to affect the pork price."

The chips are tightly fixed and are almost impossible to take off without breaking them, the spokesman said in response to questions on whether the identity chips can be swapped.

Each of the pigs sold in Chengdu will get ID chips by the end of next April, the spokesman added.


 

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