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mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2008, 08:07:14 AM »
Tuesday, April 29, 2008Print This Page
Consumers Seeking Familiar Foods Produced Closer to Home
CANADA - The Manitoba Food Processors Association says growing numbers of Canadian consumers are seeking out locally produced food products that they're familiar and feel comfortable with, writes Bruce Cochrane.





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Surveys show greater numbers of Canadians are reading and understanding food labels and using the information on those labels to make purchasing decisions while seeking products produced closer to home.

Manitoba Food Processors Association executive director Dave Shambrook says what's really interesting is the number one reason behind the "Buy Local" movement is a desire to support local companies.


Dave Shambrook-Manitoba Food Processors Association
There's a recognition that we need to support our local businesses to have a stronger economy, a stronger community because it affects us all and that was a little surprising.

We know that's one of the first benefits that happens when more local products are introduced and sold into a market but that was a little bit surprising that it was the number one issue and it's a strong number one.

But, close behind that is the issue of food safety.

here is a strong perception by consumers that something that's been produced closer to home is a safer product.

I think, again, there's a recognition that Canadian food safety systems work, they work well, the industry is very responsible so food safety is certainly something that's driving this.

Another part of it is that consumers are looking for variety.

They are looking for things that they are comfortable with, things they've seen in the stores, things they know come from the local production community so to speak and that's a counter trend to, if you will, it's a global market.

We're interested in buying things from all over the world.

At the same time there's sort of this, let's get back to basics, let's get back to foods that we're comfortable with and familiar with.

Shambrook says more an more consumers are making purchasing decisions based on what they are reading and their understanding which encourages the manufacturers to make sure they are adhering to regulations and that their products are well packaged, promoted and merchandised.





mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2008, 08:54:03 AM »
Wednesday, April 30, 2008Print This Page
Prairieland Park Plans New Interactive Agricultural Display
CANADA - Saskatoon Prairieland Park plans to unveil a new interactive agricultural display as part of its annual summer fair in August, writes Bruce Cochrane.





Farm-Scape is sponsored by
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Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
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Saskatoon Prairieland Park is a community-driven, nonprofit corporation which serves agriculture, industry, entertainment, education, sports, and culture.

To reintroduce agriculture to Saskatoon's summer fair, a series of interactive displays is being created.

Agriculture Manager Lori Cates says phase one will focus on the dairy, beef, pork and poultry sectors.


Lori Cates-Prairieland Park
Each exhibit will consist of touch screens, some computers, some hands on flip open boards so kids can interact with the station so it's not just go and read some text.

It will be very very hands on.

Each station or display will focus on different aspects with those commodity groups, the social impact of that group in Saskatchewan, economic impact, the nutritional information and the environmental impact of that commodity group in Saskatchewan.

We're going to talk about economics, we're going to talk about where are there jobs in agriculture now, we're going to talk about where their food comes from.

Our society is becoming more and more urban oriented given that a lot of people don't understand where their food comes from, how the animals are cared for.

We want to teach people that the food that's grown here in Saskatchewan is nutritious, is well looked after and that we have a thriving industry in agriculture here in Saskatchewan.

The displays will be introduced during the summer fair in August but will also be used at other events at Prairieland Park.

Cates estimates over a quarter million people could be exposed to the exhibit during a given year.






mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #32 on: May 02, 2008, 10:26:52 AM »
Thursday, May 01, 2008Print This Page
Cull Program Passes Halfway Point
CANADA - Canadian pork producers have already submitted applications to cover more than half of the 10 per cent target set by the Cull Breeding Swine Program.



The CAN$50 million program, funded by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, is being accepted as a necessary step in the industry's ongoing efforts to adjust to current market realities. More than 75,000 animals were committed to the program in the first two weeks.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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"The immediate surge of applications upon launch of the program is a clear indication of the financial stress and market pressures Canadian pork producers have been struggling with" 
Clare Schlegel, President, Canadian Pork Council.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
"The immediate surge of applications upon launch of the program is a clear indication of the financial stress and market pressures Canadian pork producers have been struggling with," says Clare Schlegel, president of the Canadian Pork Council. "We are pleased that the Federal government has provided assistance to adjust the size of our breeding herd in order to build a more robust industry long term."

Claims received to date indicate that two thirds of the animals eligible for the program were marketed prior to the program launch date. This shows producers were already trying to adjust to market conditions on their own. Meat from these animals was marketed through regular food channels.

Significant Action
Recent assistance from several provinces and private investors will allow a significant portion of the meat from animals culled after the April 14th launch date to be donated to food banks. "We are very pleased that much of the meat is destined to feed the hungry," says Schlegel. "While producers are suffering through a period when pork has little market value, this donated protein source will be greatly appreciated by the food banks and those individuals who rely on them."

Applications for the Cull Breeding Swine Program are available on the Canadian Pork Council website at www.cpc-ccp.com. Producers are also encouraged to contact the toll free line at 877-655-2567 to receive more information or assistance with the application process.

The Canadian Pork Council serves as the national voice for hog producers in Canada. The federation is composed of nine provincial pork industry associations and plays a leadership role in achieving and maintaining a dynamic and prosperous Canadian pork sector.

 




mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #33 on: May 02, 2008, 10:28:18 AM »
, May 01, 2008Print This Page
Canadians Cautioned to Expect Higher Food Prices
CANADA - The University of Guelph is cautioning consumers to expect higher prices for everything from corn flakes to pork chops in the coming months, Bruce Cochrane.





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Increased cost and reduced availability of food around the world, characterized by food riots in several countries and action to protect food security in others, have started to capture the attention of consumers.

Dr. Dave Sparling, the associate dean for research and graduate studies with the College of Management and Economics at the Univesity of Guelph, blames a combination of factors.


Dr. Dave Sparling-University of Guelph
We've got a lot higher production costs for food now.

Everybody looks at the rising gas prices and that affects farmers production, it affects the cost of processing food, the cost of moving food and costs are being pushed up from that direction.

Then things like fertilizer prices are going up so really it's costing more to produce food.

You've also got some new streams of demand coming on.

People are starting to turn corn for example into ethanol and that we haven't been doing before so that's putting a little more price pressure on grains.

Then there's a lot more demand for grains from China and India in particular because their economies are very active and very hot.

People are becoming better off in those countries and when people in developing nations become better off they tend to eat more who grains, more meat products and so there's even more new demand for grains.

So overall grain prices are going up and then, when grain prices go up, they start to push up the things that use grain, breads, pastas, meat, so on so we're seeing all of this happening.

Dr. Sparling notes Canada is a major food exporter so Canadians aren't experiencing any shortages and, because of the higher dollar and stiff retail competition, Canadians have not seen as much food inflation but he expects that to change in the coming months and certainly by the end of the year.

He says food prices in Canada will remain among the cheapest in the world but he expects food inflation to outpace general inflation over the next few years.




mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #34 on: May 02, 2008, 10:30:23 AM »
Thursday, May 01, 2008Print This Page
Alberta to Fund Pork for Food Banks
CANADA - Around $300,000 will be provided by Alberta's Provioncial government to process ground pork from animals slaughtered through the federal cull breeding swine program. The meat will go to the province's charity food banks.



The provincial funding, announced yesterday, will help pay to process cull sows from the program in cuts that can be used for further processing. The meat is destined for the Alberta Food Bank Network Association  - which will also help fund the project, says a report in Alberta's Farmer Express..

"This announcement is welcome news, as there is now the opportunity to have the pork products from culled animals be donated to Albertans in need, allowing some good to come out of the devastating crisis occurring in the hog industry," Alberta Pork policy and communications director Jodi Hesse said in the province's press release.

Alberta Pork will oversee the donation program, working with Sunterra Meats, Lucerne Foods and the Western Hog Exchange to process and transport the meat, the province said.





mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #35 on: May 04, 2008, 08:59:46 AM »
Federal Cull Breeding Reaches Half Way Point
CANADA - The Canadian Pork Council reports over half of the funding being offered under a federal program to reduce Canada's swine breeding herd has now been applied for, writes Bruce Cochrane.





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Under the 50 million dollar Federal Cull Breeding Swine Program, officially launched April 14, swine producers who agree to depopulate breeding barns and leave them empty of breeding stock for a minimum of three years are eligible to receive 225 dollars per animal culled.

The program was developed in response to the depressed economic situation in the pork industry brought on by an over supply of hogs, escalating feed costs and a strong Canadian dollar and targets a ten percent reduction in the national breeding herd.

Canadian Pork Council executive Martin Rice reports interest among producers has been strong.


Martin Rice-Canadian Pork Council
We have seen actually more than the halfway point in terms of animals.

To the extent that we were looking at a ten percent program allowance, that's about 154 thousand breeding animals.

We've seen 78 thousand applied for.

That's slightly over half.

Certainly in the two Maritime provinces they have gone well beyond the ten percent of their herd that is applying to be eliminated.

I think in British Columbia and Quebec it would be perhaps lower participation at this point but there has been an increase in recent days in submissions from Quebec.

Ontario is by some margin the largest number of claims and the largest number of breeding stock that they would to have covered by the program.

Rice notes the program is already over halfway subscribed.

He recommends anyone with an interest in this program should get their applications in at their earliest opportunity.




mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #36 on: May 04, 2008, 09:01:49 AM »
Friday, May 02, 2008Print This Page
Commission to Analyse Long-Term Prospects
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND - A new commission on the future of agriculture and agri-food in Prince Edward Island expects to draft a long-term vision for its agri-sector.


In a report for the Manitoba Co-operator, Agriculture Minister Neil LeClair said it was apparent that the current commodity model of production is not working for producers in this province.

"We need a unique Island approach to issues that are facing the agriculture sector nationally and globally," he said in a release. "We are in a unique position to succeed, and the new commission will help to define that approach."

The PEI commission, which is expected to produce a draft report by about Oct. 14 and a final report by 5 December is launched in the wake of the final report of a similar commission in Quebec in February.

The Quebec commission recommended a number of both sweeping and minor changes meant to encourage young people to enter the industry, spur diversification and development, and revamp provincial ag income supports.

The PEI commission, whose members have yet to be named, will be co-chaired by former provincial deputy ag minister Rory Francis and by ag economist Ed Tyrchniewicz, associate dean of the University of Manitoba's Asper School of Business.





mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #37 on: May 06, 2008, 08:07:24 AM »
Monday, May 05, 2008Print This Page
Manitoba Abbattoirs Interested in Culled Swine
CANADA - Manitoba Pork Council reports a strong interest among provincial abattoirs in processing the pork from the hogs slaughtered under a federal program to reduce the national breeding for use by food banks, writes Bruce Cochrane.





Farm-Scape is sponsored by
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Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
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Under the Federal Cull Breeding Swine Program producers who agree to depopulate breeding barns for a minimum of three years are eligible to receive 225 dollars per culled animal but those animals may not go into the commercial food distribution chain.

A 500 thousand dollar contribution from the Manitoba government will allow some of the animals culled in Manitoba to be directed to use by the province's food banks.

Manitoba Pork Council producer services specialist Jeff Clark says interest among the provincial abattoirs in playing a role has been strong.


Jeff Clark-Manitoba Pork Council
In Manitoba, because we don't have large provincial abattoirs, our two federal plants aren't equipped to handle large sows at this point, so we've had to go to our smaller provincial abattoirs of which we have about 25.

We're looking at a model where we're going to have to distribute animals around the province.

Other provinces have had a central processing plant step forward willing to do the processing.

Again, here we'll have to distribute around to our smaller plants.

We've had some very strong interest from our provincial abattoirs and they've been very patient with waiting for this announcement.

I first contacted them at the beginning of April to gauge some of the interest out there.

There was significant interest but again we had to wait until confirmation of the funds from the province before we could actually move forward.

Winnipeg harvest has been following up with the provincial plants to negotiate price and scheduling etceteras so the interest is very strong.

Clark says having a food bank option has been critical for producers.

He notes producers have put a lot of care into raising their animals and they want to see those animals put to the best possible use.



mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #38 on: May 06, 2008, 08:09:02 AM »
Monday, May 05, 2008Print This Page
Biofuel Ethusiasm Problematic for Hog famers
CANADA - According to industry figures, when a hog farmer takes his hog to market, he suffers a loss of between $50 to $60 a hog, which, in a year's time, averages $300,000 to $360,000 in total net losses per farm.



"Our whole industry is in a crisis," says Jerry Gelderman, a Fraser Valley hog farmer and vice-chair of the B.C. Hog Marketing Commission.

He explains that in addition to normal price swings in pork markets, which currently are at a cyclical bottom, the strong Canadian dollar is also placing hardship on producers.

But the worst culprit, by far, according to the Province, is the use of wheat and corn to produce ethanol as an alternative to fossil fuels in motor vehicles. Gelderman says the cost to feed a hog over the five-month period from birth to market has increased by $38 over last year. That's a hike of about 50 per cent.

Costs for fuel, equipment, etc., are also increasing, but the price hog farmers now receive for their animals has fallen due to regular market forces. "We can usually adjust to the normal market cycles in our industry and to the higher Canadian dollar," Gelderman says.

"But the feed issue is now causing some farmers to get out of the business, and the only way we'll be able to adjust will be to pass these higher costs on to the consumer," he warns. "And it's government policies on ethanol that causes the most frustration," he adds.

It's not surprising, then, that many hog producers and others wonder why the federal and provincial governments actively push the use of food grains to produce ethanol when many non-food fibres such as wood waste (B.C.'s beetle-killed pine trees, for example) or even municipal garbage could be used.



mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #39 on: May 06, 2008, 08:10:40 AM »
Monday, May 05, 2008Print This Page
Hog Producers Pay to Wait
MANITOBA - The Winnipeg Free Press says: Manitoba's weanling pig producers are playing an expensive waiting game (it costs some of them thousands of dollars a week) while U.S. legislators put the finishing touches on this year's long-delayed American Farm Bill.



The province's hog industry has made plans for a mass euthanization of baby pigs, if that becomes necessary, but for now pig producers are managing to find a home for the animals, albeit at a tremendous cost.

Albert Bourrier, a partner in a hog farm south of Steinbach, said he's never sustained such high losses since he got into the business in 1984.

A few weeks ago, he was getting as little as $7 for a three-week-old weanling pig that costs anywhere from $36 to $42 to produce. Now, he's getting closer to $15 an animal.

"When you sell 800 a week, it's a big difference," Bourrier said Friday of the modest bump in price.

He and other hog farmers are hanging on every news report out of Washington tracking the progress of country of origin labelling legislation (COOL) expected to be part of the U.S. Farm Bill.

Uncertainty over the final wording of that legislation -- and how U.S. meat packers and retailers react to it -- has wreaked havoc with an export-dependent Manitoba hog industry that's already beset by high feed grain prices, a strong loonie and a general surplus of North American pigs.

The U.S. Congress has approved an extension until May 16 to ready the Farm Bill for President George Bush to sign. It would set out U.S. agricultural policy for the next five years.

Producers struggling to stay in business for the long haul see some optimism in distant hog futures markets that could see them recover most of their weanling production costs three or four months from now.

Others, have gone to great lengths to deal with the crisis.

View the Winnipeg Free Press story



mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #40 on: May 07, 2008, 09:20:43 AM »
Tuesday, May 06, 2008Print This Page
Weather and Direction of Feed Grain Prices Linked
CANADA - A Winnipeg grain market analyst says weather over the next few weeks will be critical in determining the direction of feed grain prices over the next six to nine months, writes Bruce Cochrane.





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Although feed grain prices have not been as explosive as they were in 2007, prices remain strong with corn hovering near record highs and feed barley and feed wheat markets in Canada holding firm.

Informa Economics senior analyst Dave Reimann reports, because of the tight carryout situation in most feed markets, the trade is concerned with potential acreage and potential yields.


Dave Reimann-Informa Economics
We're seeing some change happening globally in some markets.

For instance wheat is starting to be harvested around the world.

That's putting a bit of pressure into the wheat markets that didn't exist in much of 2007 or over the winter.

Those markets are staring to come down and we will see more and more wheat harvest really kick into gear over the next few months.

As we get into May and June we'll start to see more harvesting going on in China and the U.S., in Europe.

As those harvests start to hit, we expect that wheat prices will drop a bit and some of that wheat will find it's way into the feed channels.

That will help to alleviate some of the upward pressure in things like corn or barley as an example.

But, until that really starts to make its way into the pipeline, it's difficult to break these markets very far.

Traders right now are probably guessing something in the area of around 154 to 155 bushels per acre average yield for corn but, if the bulk of the crop goes in really in the first week of June or something, then we probably won't be able to achieve those kinds of yields.

Reimann says, if we get a substantial amount of the crop seeded in the next two weeks in much of the U.S. corn belt, some of the stress will come out of the market and prices will tend to sag but, if planting falls well behind average, the market will want to build in more of a weather premium and we could see some explosive rallies heading into June and July... so the next four weeks will probably be key as to the long term direction of the feed complex.



mikey

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #41 on: May 07, 2008, 09:25:02 AM »
Tuesday, May 06, 2008Print This Page
Pork Commentary: Canada’s Industry Downsizes
CANADA - This weeks North American Pork Commentary from Jim Long.

 

Low hog prices, high feed prices and the increase in the Canadian dollar have devastated the Canadian swine industry. Canada’s breeding herd has now decreased approximately 180,000 sows from its zenith. According to Statistics Canada on April 1st the year over year Canadian breeding herd decline was 72,000 (1570.7 to 1498.7). Now the Canadian government sow cull has been activated. As of the end of last week we understand there were just under 100,000 sows enrolled to be slaughtered. Our inside sourced tell us that approximately 150,000 will be the eventual casualties. Put the numbers together. It indicates that Canada will end up with over 300,000 less sows than at the peak of production. That’s a lot of empty buildings, less feed utilization, less added value but most importantly there are people involved. People without jobs, producers and owners who have seen their dreams dashed by the cruel reality of the commodity marketplace. Producing food (pork) under the cost of production might be good for consumers but it is devastating to producers.

There obviously will be less pork generated by Canada’s production system now and in the future. Canada’s market hog inventory on April 1st was 1.65 million head fewer than a year ago (13,158.3 – 11,501.6).

This drop in production is rapidly decreasing Canada’s pork export capacity. As fewer hogs go on feed in Canada, the United States supremacy as the world’s pork export champion magnifies.


Other Observations
2008 US sow slaughter has been consistently higher year over year. The latest number 73,000 per week. The US, we believe, is currently decreasing its sow herd 5,000 a week. There are next to no new sow barns being built. The plus/minus of sow inventory is mostly minus. Many sow units have fewer females as cash flow limit gilt retention and purchase. The price of sows is a reflection of the supply/demand. Last week some market hogs were bringing 60¢ live lb while heavy sows were 25¢ live lb. Usually there is a 10¢ lb spread. Now the huge number of sows coming to market is allowing sausage makers to buy at a very discounted price. They are paying 25¢ lb because that’s all they have to. Low sow prices are leading to sow retention rather than adding gilts. The breeding herd is getting older. This will lower productivity and lead to higher sow mortality in time, manifested by fewer potential market hogs.


Slaughter weights are falling fast – about one lb a week. This is despite the lack of hot or humid weather, hog growing conditions are excellent. One pound a week in weight decrease is pulling hogs ahead. Probably 5 to 7% a week. Might be over 100,000 head a week. You can only kill them once. How low weights will go with hot weather and $6.00 corn? Probably 250 lbs. Less hogs, less pork = higher prices. Pulling hogs ahead means this ‘dog is going to run out of chain.’


Got to love the wizard ag-economists that predicted four weeks ago $56.00 lean hog average for the balance of 2008. Check the futures. We got a $70 plus average to the end of the year. Hey, what’s $25 to $30 a head difference – unless you actually own hogs? Wonder sometimes if they can get across the road without traffic lights.


Corn-ethanol is in trouble. It’s being abandoned by the environmentalists. The states of Missouri and Texas are contemplating suspending mandated ethanol utilization. $6.00 corn is putting some corn ethanol processors in the red. Worldwide governments and agencies are questioning the social, political and economic implications. Food riots, hunger, starvation are all being associated with the corn ethanol insanity. We understand John McCain did not the Iowa caucuses because of his prior opposition to corn ethanol. Last week, in a bizarre and ludicrous statement, the head of the bio-fuel lobby said that corn ethanol had no effect on grain or food prices. DUH! Too bad cowboy - start looking for another job. Do the arithmetic, 99.5% of people eat ½ of 1% grow corn. Where do you think the politicians, environmentalists, consumers are going to point the finger? It’s over. It’s an election year. The higher corn price goes, the faster corn ethanol will be marginalized.


The corn growers that championed corn ethanol will rue the day. Livestock herds that are liquidating throughout the world cuts corn demand and utilization. It has been a plan to kill your customers. Someday you will want them back but they will be gone. Government policies that created tariffs, subsidies and mandates have distorted global food supply and pricing.


The Ontario Pork Producers Marketing Board (OPPMB), the official agency for all of Ontario’s hog marketings must be congratulated. Leadership is prevailing. After years of monopoly powers, hiring of their own police, top down management there is a breath of fresh air. Recently, the OPPMB General Manager left (the former Chief dog catcher at the Toronto Humane Society) after years of hostility with many leading producers. Hopefully this is a sign of reform. Canada and OntarioÂ’s hog industry is in transformation. When things are bad and restraint needed leaders know that flying first class is a symbol of privilege and entitlement not responsibility. Ontario has been devastated by lack of leadership in the past, the industry has downsized more than any other major hog producing area in Canada. For pro-Ontario producers’ sake OPPMB needs to find leadership with wisdom and knowledge. “People you would give money to buy you a used car.”
Summary
Looks like Canada will decrease 300,000 plus sows. The US will take out 200,000 before the dust settles. Mexico will be down 100,000. We believe 600,000 in total or about 10 million hogs of production capacity gone. We already have 70¢ lean plus hogs with US marketings over 2.2 million a week. Global pork demand for North American pork is unprecedented. The liquidation of the 600,000 sows has not decreased supply yet. It will come. Magnify this with decreasing of sows in just about everywhere in the world. We might be overly optimistic but we see continued price appreciation, at some point probably in 2009, we will see hog prices at levels that are incomprehensible. We all see how fast prices can rise. On March 21, Iowa-Minnesota was 48.89. By last Friday, May 2, it was 73.02 (6 weeks). A gain of $48.00 per head. We believe hogs will reach 80¢ lean in the coming weeks.



Author: Jim Long, President & CEO, Genesus Genetics 



To find out more about Genesus Genetics,
please take the time to visit their website at
www.genesus.net.

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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #42 on: May 07, 2008, 09:27:25 AM »
Tuesday, May 06, 2008Print This Page
Phase One of Revitalization Plan Launched
CANADA - Alberta’s pork industry, fighting an unprecedented financial crisis, is searching aggressively around the world and outside the pork industry in order to build a realistic plan for long-term revitalization.

 

“Our industry is in an immediate crisis and we continue to deal with that,” says Herman Simons, Alberta Pork chairman and Tees, Alberta pork producer. “But there is also a pressing need to move quickly in order to find new ways to lead the industry over the long term.

“For that reason, Alberta Pork is developing a plan of action for producers. The first report, called ‘The Way Forward,’ is a summary of findings from independent consultants who have studied models of success in pork industries around the world, as well as companies and industries that have faced similar circumstances and rose to the occasion. This summary of findings will form the basis for the long-term strategic plan.

“This strategy is about leading the industry in a new way, not simply managing the status quo, nor building on long-term financial support from government,” says Simons. “There is definitely not a ‘silver bullet’ or ‘one size fits all’ solution for pork producers who have individual needs and challenges. There are clearly no easy or simple solutions and we know that not all producers are going to survive.”

To develop the strategy, Alberta Pork retained Toma & Bouma Management Consultants and the George Morris Centre, who in turn consulted with appropriate resources both nationally and internationally.

The first pillar of this new revitalization strategy, a state of the union report on the Alberta pork industry, is now available to Alberta pork producers. That will be followed shortly by a final report, which will include specific recommendations for long-term changes to the industry in areas such as feed grains, marketing, and industry reorganization of the supply chain, says Simons.

“With other markets succeeding in pork, the consultants looked beyond the Canadian pork industry for models of success,” says Simons. “Five different pork value chains are examined, all of which are examples of well-organized and systematic approaches to production, processing and marketing.”

The consultants also studied industries and businesses outside the pork industry that have faced similar situations. “Those examples, which include forestry, Toyota, the wine industry and the New Zealand dairy industry, provide several guidelines,” says Simons. “Key among them is that to simply survive requires a competitive level of organizational efficiency and operational excellence. They also highlight how imperative it is to commit to a long-term vision and strategy.

“For the pork industry to succeed we need to learn from these guidelines and change our industry accordingly.”

A Special Report summary of the first 180-page report is being mailed to producers. A similar summary will be prepared in conjunction with the consultants’ final document. “This first publication, ‘The Way Forward’ report, is not the strategy itself,” says Simons. “Rather, it provides the background and in-depth understanding required to build a realistic plan to revitalize the industry. To find the solution, you first have to fully understand the problem.”




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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #43 on: May 08, 2008, 08:34:21 AM »
Wednesday, May 07, 2008Print This Page
Welcome News for Canadian Agriculture
CANADA - Farm Credit Canada says, overall, the recent softening of the value of the Canadian dollar is welcome news for Canadian farmers competing on the international market, writes Bruce Cochrane.





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The value of the Canadian dollar has trended upward over the past several years peaking last November.

Over the past weeks the dollar has softened somewhat and some analysts are predicting it could slide to the low to mid 90 cent U.S. range by year's end.

Farm Credit Canada vice president prairie operations Mike Hoffort notes Canadian agriculture is export dependent and, as the value of the dollar increases, returns from exports decline so a softening of the dollar would be good news for agriculture.


Mike Hoffort-Farm Credit Canada
There's a number of factors and that's where the complexity of the whole agriculture sector comes into play that go beyond the dollar.

At this stage, and using the hog sector as an example, as much as the Canadian dollar was really a big story in the past 12 months in terms of when it was appreciating and the corresponding reduction in hog values, right now an equally important factor would be the price of feed.

So whether it's corn or those products that go into hogs, that's impacted some of that profitability and definitely comes into play there.

We've had historically high grain and oilseed prices r3ecently and even with the higher dollar, our grains and oilseed producers that have been able to get a good crop have done quite well.

On the other side, on the livestock side, the Canadian dollar appreciation combined with some of the increase in feed prices really took a lot of profitability out of that sector and actually some producers have been running some losses in recent months.

There's quite a number of different stories that take place depending on what your primary sector is and how you're structured.

Hoffort adds, if the dollar drops, the price of feed could drift up which could reduce profitability in the cattle and hog sectors.

However, overall, he believes we'd see improvements in profitability on Canadian farms if the dollar softens.



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Re: Canadian Pork Producers:
« Reply #44 on: May 09, 2008, 09:04:43 AM »
Thursday, May 08, 2008Print This Page
High Demand Pushes Up Live Hog Prices
CANADA - Despite continued high levels of production and high volumes of pork in storage live hog prices in western Canada have risen dramatically over the past few weeks, writes Bruce Cochrane.





Farm-Scape is sponsored by
Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork

Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
and Sask Pork. 
Canadian hog slaughter numbers have increased by almost one percent compared to the same period a year ago while in the United States slaughter numbers have averaged over 2.2 million head per week over the past eight weeks, up about eight percent from a year ago.

Brad Marceniuk, a livestock economist with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture says, while slaughter numbers continue to be high, the current seasonal demand for pork and strong exports have pushed hog prices upward.


Brad Marceniuk-Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture
At the present time live hog demand in the United States is up about eight percent which is the main factor for increasing hog prices and we've also seen a big strong increase in pork exports in the world.

Based on lean hog futures prices index 100 hogs for western Canada could average in the upper 130's for the second quarter and could average in the mid 130's for the third quarter.

Live hog demand and strong pork exports will be key factors sustaining these current prices at these current high production levels.

The rate of North American sow liquidation and weekly U.S. hog slaughter numbers will continue to be important factors in stimulating higher pork prices and for sustaining longer term price improvements.

While demand has improved prices in the short term, production to date has not reduced significantly to signal if prices will remain strong at these levels into the fall.

Marceniuk notes stocks of beef in cold storage have been relatively unchanged but pork and poultry stocks have increased in the range of 30 percent year over year and, while storage stocks have not impacted live hog prices to a large degree in the short term, if these stocks remain high we could see price pressure into the third and fourth quarters.

However he notes we have seen some sow liquidation in Canada and the U. S. and, as we see more sow liquidation, we'll see reduced production which would help push prices up further in the longer term.




 

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